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This item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2003-06-15
 Author: Isao  Umebayashi and Larry L. Smith. Taikyoku Shogi. Taikyoku Shogi. Extremely large shogi variant. (36x36, Cells: 1296) [All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Jeremy Hook wrote on 2015-12-19 UTCGood ★★★★
Actually I am having to make my own board, hand drawing all the symbols on paper pieces, because no-one sells them in any way, shape, or form. Another thing is that if you google Taikyoku shogi in addition to a couple of images of your search,you will get a lot of images of Tai shogi, which is actually played enough to mention as more than a historic curiosity. Tai shogi is played on a "mere" 25x25 board, but the players still have to use tongs to reach the other side of the board. I was telling my grandmother about Taikyoku shogi, and she suggested that the reason that it disappeared and was forgotten about is that the "three people who played it died". There is no evidence that it was ever widely played. Wonder why. There is however one (1!) youtube video of it.

Jeremy Hook wrote on 2015-12-19 UTCGood ★★★★
Actually I am having to make my own board, hand drawing all the symbols on paper pieces, because no-one sells them in any way, shape, or form. Another thing is that if you google Taikyoku shogi in addition to a couple of images of your search,you will get a lot of images of Tai shogi, which is actually played enough to mention as more than a historic curiosity. Tai shogi is played on a "mere" 25x25 board, but the players still have to use tongs to reach the other side of the board. I was telling my grandmother about Taikyoku shogi, and she suggested that the reason that it disappeared and was forgotten about is that the "three people who played it died". There is no evidence that it was ever widely played. Wonder why. There is however one (1!) youtube video of it.

Christine Bagley-Jones wrote on 2011-01-12 UTCExcellent ★★★★★
hey, u would have to walk on the board to make move would u? (lol)
love how big it is, probably would be hell to play :)

what is the difference between 'step' and 'slide', is 'step' different from 'leap', i dont kinda understand.

M Winther wrote on 2011-01-05 UTCPoor ★
I think it's appalling. It is incredibly over the top complicated and makes no sense at all. 
/Mats

Hafsteinn Kjartansson wrote on 2010-06-29 UTCExcellent ★★★★★
According to http://taikyokushogi.hp.infoseek.co.jp/taikyoku.swf, this mark -|-|-|-> means 'may jump over three pieces on its way'. In this link,  get the piece that starts at 20 32 out on the board and look at the forward-diagonal moves: it may move four spaces into the opponents start row, jumping over three pieces- or one, or two, jumping over one, or three, jumping over two.

George Duke wrote on 2008-05-27 UTCExcellent ★★★★★
The promotees here, numbering over 100, are particularly under-utilized elsewhere. CV Prolificists wanting to enlarge portfolios, we may not have stressed enough that here are over 250 piece-types, ready-made and well-defined, many never before used in other than large and very large Shogis, as Taikyoku Shogi. Why not incorporate these within 8x8, 8x10, 10x10 pairwise taking mixes of specific quartets, quintets, to balance the sides, both across and along, of starting arrays symmetrically. Many tens of thousands of new games would easily become available. Like Frank Truelove's piece list of several thousand pieces, those defined in Prichard's 'ECV' 1994 and Dickens' 'Guide to Fairy Chess' 1967, this article too by Umebayashi and Smith should become standard fare for your building blocks -- way beyond the Betza atoms five.

George Duke wrote on 2008-05-21 UTCGood ★★★★
Here are over 250 piece-types within one game for your new combinations. Taikyoku Shogi has more pieces than Mujotai Shogi. Are any of them worth a second look? [Follow-up below brackets] Treasure Turtle (233 last) is (D+W+F) in Western terms.

SHOGI MAN wrote on 2008-04-13 UTCPoor ★
There are a few characters that is displayed as boxes in my browser.

Andy Maxson wrote on 2007-02-27 UTCGood ★★★★
there is a flash version of this game for all of you who would like to
play
http://taikyokushogi.hp.infoseek.co.jp/taikyoku.html
the site is in japanes and doesn't recognize check maybe you could add it
on as a link

Gary Gifford wrote on 2006-09-26 UTCExcellent ★★★★★
Thanks for the link and excellent design work, which allows us westerners to more easily grasp the Taikyoku Shogi pieces and their wide variety of movement.

Jeremy Good wrote on 2006-09-26 UTCExcellent ★★★★★
Oh, boy, you are going to make a lot of people happy with this. Thanks so much for sharing. Just what I've been looking for! Awesome!

Big Ole Bob wrote on 2006-09-26 UTCGood ★★★★

Here is my print-able 'westernized' version of the Taikyoku Shogi Set.

The movement patterns are based off of the descriptions I found here and from wikipedia. Some pieces I know are somewhat oddly described or given a differnt movement type via combineing the move 'this way OR this way' together so those overlapping 'directions' are combined. The entire set is available for download at the following location. All images are to scale for print out based on an 8.5 x 11 sheet of paper with 1/2 side margins and 1 inch top & bottom margins. The pages have 'corner dots' which prevent 'streach/resize' programs from adjusting the final image's size after cropping off what it percieves as 'blank' space. This keeps all pages the exact same size each time it's printed. The only exception is the 'title, icon legend, and editors notes' pages which are all in an image format.

http://www.angelfire.com/alt2/robertkalin/tos.html

Please give me some feedback and tell me what you think. Feel free to distribute the set online. All that I request is that it is left unaltered and kept together in the same compressed 'zip' file complete with all pages including the title, icon legend, and editors notes pages.

Big-Ole-Bob


Sean Humby wrote on 2006-04-04 UTCExcellent ★★★★★
Hey, Bob!!!

can you provide a link for your printer tested pieces???? that'd make my
day!

I'd just like to say... I cant wait to play this game once it's more
canonized! Anyone who doesn't like large board shogi variants is afraid
of commitment! ;)

Warheart wrote on 2004-12-28 UTCExcellent ★★★★★
Damn great!!! Can just anyone tell me where to get real stones and a board? I really need one!!! If you have information for me please e-mail to [email protected]! Well, otherwise I guess I have to make my own stones, huh, that'll be a bunch of work to do. Anyway, ... great!!!

Anonymous wrote on 2004-09-30 UTCPoor ★
there are too many pieces.

RJ wrote on 2003-07-10 UTCExcellent ★★★★★
Here goes my ranting: I wish I has a way to 'see' the way the pieces move. I could write up the zillons file, but where would i get the graphics for the pieces? I would like to know if this is at all playable! Or is it going to take a week to finish a resonably thought out game? I didn't think tenjiku would be, but I was proved wrong. There's a lot of pieces to sift though here. Are there any pieces that direct the game? (like the lion in chu?)Is George H. planning on selling sets now that there are rules? My carpet needs to be replaced. :)

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