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NEW! This item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2019-01-12
 By wdtr2. Shako_Balbo. Game with Diamond Shape Board.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Aurelian Florea wrote on 2019-01-15 UTC

@wdtr2 Thanks for mentionning me. It would help to also include why, but maybe that's not crucial :)! Have fun!


wdtr2 wrote on 2019-01-15 UTC

The rules have been updated for elephant, cannon, and Pawns.


NEW! This item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2019-01-02
 By Adam  DeWitt. Hectochess. 10x10 variant that can be played with 2 mismatched Chess sets.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Ben Reiniger wrote on 2019-01-14 UTC

John, please feel free to email me with any questions about the submission process.  I'd be happy to help you, and even happier to know of any pain points we might be able to simplify.


H. G. Muller wrote on 2019-01-14 UTC

Yet it doesn't seem to require much more skill than typing. So I want to encourage you to try it. I am quite curious for your solution to a 10x10 version of Chu Shogi.


John Davis wrote on 2019-01-13 UTC

Oops, I didn't intend for the extra posts. I too am a fan of the 10 x 10 board, but lack the computer skills to post pages for my 10 x 10 Courier and Chu Shogi.


John Davis wrote on 2019-01-13 UTC

I am  excited to see a game that uses the Leo, but I find it confusing that it is called Cannon. As an aesthetic issue, I don't agree with using the standard Cannon in Yangsi and then calling the Leo a Cannon in Hecto. There is a Leo graphic in the Abstract set. 

On a more stylistic note, the introduction mentions using a second set of pieces for OTB play. I might have used the inverted graphics of the FIDE pieces in the Alfaerie preset to suggest which pieces to substitute .


NEW! This item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2019-01-12
 By wdtr2. Shako_Balbo. Game with Diamond Shape Board.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Ben Reiniger wrote on 2019-01-12 UTC

While it's easy enough to guess your intention by looking at the Shako and Balbo pages, this page should mention the powers of the elephant and cannon, pawn starts and promotions.  (I guess castling is pretty obviously out.)


UPDATED! This item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2019-01-11
 By Adam  DeWitt. Yangsi. (Updated!) A very playable chess variant with 12 different pieces on a 10x10 board.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Adam DeWitt wrote on 2019-01-11 UTC

Increasing the board size does give the pieces more freedom of movement, Mr. Duniho, but it also does another thing - it makes it harder to keep track of everything. You yourself have stated this in your article "On Designing Good Chess Variants" in the section "Don't make your game too small or too large."

"Small games can finish too quickly, and large games can last too long. Note that the three classics are on moderate sized boards, ranging in size from 8x8 for Chess to 9x10 for Xiang Qi. 10x10 has proven a good size for many games, though 12x12 and up might be too large. I have recently (November 2009) created a 12x12 variant called Gross Chess. To some extent, this is an experiment with a board of this size. The only pieces it adds have been tried and tested in other variants, which allows the game to be a test mainly of the increased board size. Games against Zillions of Games suggest that the game is enjoyable but the larger size makes it harder to keep track of everything. I haven't yet won a game against Zillions without taking back moves. I have played a couple games on Game Courier, drawing one game and losing the other."

As for your comments on piece density, I don't think that cramming the pieces together within a 10x10 space will create too many problems. Kevin Pacey's Sac Chess also has a piece density of 60% at the start of the game, and is one of the top 50 games on Game Courier.


NEW! This item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2019-01-02
 By Adam  DeWitt. Hectochess. 10x10 variant that can be played with 2 mismatched Chess sets.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Adam DeWitt wrote on 2019-01-11 UTC

The name has been finalized (finally!). Many thanks to H. G. Muller for suggesting the name.


UPDATED! This item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2019-01-11
 By Adam  DeWitt. Yangsi. (Updated!) A very playable chess variant with 12 different pieces on a 10x10 board.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Adam DeWitt wrote on 2019-01-11 UTC

The rules for deciding who moves first after deciding who controls which pieces is no longer effective in Yangsi or Chess on a Hectochess.


Adam DeWitt wrote on 2019-01-11 UTC

When I designed Yangsi, I did so with the principles in Fergus Duniho's On Designing Good Chess Variants in mind. I have actually playtested this game several times. The people I played the game with all thought it was fun and very playable. I remember one particularly enjoyable game I played where I had a bare King and my opponent had a king and two pawns. That game ended in a draw via stalemate.


NEW! This item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2019-01-06
 Author: Jacek  Dobrzyniecki. Inventor: Anton  Makarenko. Makarenko's Chess. Pieces are stacks which can be split and combined to create other pieces.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
John Lawson wrote on 2019-01-11 UTC

Heck, unstack all the pieces, and turn the game into Maharaja and the Sepoys.


UPDATED! This item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2019-01-11
 By Adam  DeWitt. Yangsi. (Updated!) A very playable chess variant with 12 different pieces on a 10x10 board.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
John Davis wrote on 2019-01-10 UTC

Sac Chess has the same piece density and is a popular game. Play testing is always a good idea.


H. G. Muller wrote on 2019-01-10 UTC

Indeed, this first-move business is just the usual method for randomization of the right to move first, except that it now has a the side effects of renaming the colors and swapping King and Queen to play the game in mirror image. It adds nothing but confusion.


Fergus Duniho wrote on 2019-01-10 UTC

Deciding who moves first: In Chess and most chess-like games, the first move is always given to one side. In Chess, the side with the first move is always White. However, the side with the first move also has first-move advantage. In Chess, White has a slight statistical advantage over Black simply because White always has the first move. Because either side can move first in Yangsi, that slight statistical advantage is eliminated.

You make it sound like this is an advantage of this game, but it isn't. The first move advantage still exists. While it no longer belongs exclusively to one color, the new rule concerning who moves first doesn't change how frequently the actual players each have this advantage. I would recommend scrapping this rule, because it does not actually make the game any fairer. It is simpler and better to just follow Chess on this one and let White move first. How the players decide who will move first would then simply come down to how they decide who will move as White.

While I'm glad that Gross Chess has played a role in igniting your interest in Chess variants, I have my doubts that reducing the size of the board while keeping the same pieces will make for a better game. The opening setup in Gross Chess is designed to give most of the pieces a little bit of freedom of movement from the very beginning. That gets lost with all the pieces crammed together. Also, this game has 60% piece density at the beginning of the game, which is higher than the 50% in Chess or the 64/144 = 44.4% in Gross Chess. This might make the game more cramped. However, I haven't done any extensive study on how piece density affects game quality, and I'm only guessing that higher piece density could have a deliterious effect. Some actual gameplay is required before I can make a more considered judgement on this matter.


NEW! This item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2019-01-02
 By Adam  DeWitt. Hectochess. 10x10 variant that can be played with 2 mismatched Chess sets.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
H. G. Muller wrote on 2019-01-09 UTC

Suggestion: the name 'hectochess' appears to be still available. 'Hecto' = 100.


UPDATED! This item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2019-01-11
 By Adam  DeWitt. Yangsi. (Updated!) A very playable chess variant with 12 different pieces on a 10x10 board.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Ben Reiniger wrote on 2019-01-09 UTC

I don't see the "either side can move first" as being particularly noteworthy.  You've eliminated the white/black advantage, but the first/second player advantage isn't changed.

Personally, this seems to just be a decimal subvariant of Fergus's Gross Chess; the rule adjustments seem to just be conforming to the smaller board.  The further piece reduction to your other game (in particular using the Leo in place of the Pao and Vao) seems a more separate variant (while still clearly inspired by Gross, with the compounds and Omega pieces and hopper[s]).


NEW! This item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2019-01-02
 By Adam  DeWitt. Hectochess. 10x10 variant that can be played with 2 mismatched Chess sets.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Ben Reiniger wrote on 2019-01-09 UTC

I agree with Greg.  Since this is derived from your Yangsi, maybe the name could reference that.  "DeWitt's Decimal" would work, but it seems like you like your other decimal game better.

You needn't bother moving the content to another page just for the naming.  Since the page is pretty young, we can modify the relevant references without too much trouble.


Greg Strong wrote on 2019-01-09 UTC

Chess on a 10x10 Board is not a good name either.  Strictly speaking, this is not "Chess" on a 10x10 board.  Look at this variant for comparison - Chess on a 12 by 12 Board. It really is Chess on a 12 by 12 board.

You have to understand that there are thousands of chess variants in existence. There are a minimum of a hundred variants like this - chess expanded to a 10x10 board with a few new pieces. Inventing a new one now and trying to give it a generic name as though this is "the" representative game of the genre is not really appropriate.


Adam DeWitt wrote on 2019-01-07 UTC

The main reason I gave the name "Decimal Chess" to this variant  because I did not find any Chess variant that went by that name. I  wanted to avoid stealing the name of another game and including any part of my name when naming the game. I wanted to give the game a name that referenced the size of the board, but I couldn't a good alternative. I will put a note on the page to avoid confusion until I decide on an alternative.


NEW! This item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2019-01-06
 Author: Jacek  Dobrzyniecki. Inventor: Anton  Makarenko. Makarenko's Chess. Pieces are stacks which can be split and combined to create other pieces.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Greg Strong wrote on 2019-01-07 UTC

This is certianly an interesting idea.  The assignment of chip count to pieces though seems strange.  Why should a rook only be 3 chips?  It seems you'd immediately want to turn your bishops and knights into rook+pawns.


NEW! This item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2019-01-02
 By Adam  DeWitt. Hectochess. 10x10 variant that can be played with 2 mismatched Chess sets.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Greg Strong wrote on 2019-01-07 UTC

I'm sorry, but this game needs a different name.  "Decimal Chess" is existing terminology dating back at least a hundred years that refers generically to chess variants played on a 10x10 board.  It would not be appropriate at this point to use it as the proper name of a new variant.  Perhaps "DeWitt Decimal Chess"?


This item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 1998-02-03
 By Ben  Good. Crazy 38's. On strange board with 38 squares. (Cells: 38) (Recognized!)[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
SL Reed wrote on 2018-12-27 UTCGood ★★★★

I just began play-testing and I like it a lot.  My thoughts so far:

There is a tiny bit of ambiguity as to whether the “same file rule” from Shogi is meant to apply to pawn drops (presumably it is not). I believe it can be played either way. I haven't tested it yet, but to try, the following condition could apply:

A pawn may not be dropped onto the same vertical diagonal of any other non-promoted pawn belonging to the same player.

Or an even stricter alternative:

A pawn may not be dropped onto the same rank or file of any other non-promoted pawn belonging to the same player.

In the illustrations for piece movement, notice how the rook travels through one edge and then through the opposite edge of each square in its path (even if the 'square' curves a right angle), while the bishop travels through one corner and then through the opposite corner of each square in its path, but seems to be prohibited from doing so on the curved squares (from the black bishop's position in the diagram). If this prohibition were lifted, that same black bishop's range of movement would include traveling from one curved edge square to the next and then back across the board horizontally, forming a loop back to it's original position.

Also, although it is not explicitly mentioned in the original rules, I think it's probably a good idea to declare that a rook or  a queen (or a bishop) may not land on the square from which they originated on that turn, even if a path to it exists unobstructed.

Finally, my thoughts about the pawn. The language and illustration of the original rules regarding pawn movement suggests that pawns capturing moves and non-capturing moves are executed in the same way (unlike conventional chess). Optionally, one could alter the rules for pawn movement so that it moves (but does not capture) exactly one square in either of the orthogonal directions that is away from its own side of the playing board or it can capture to the cell diagonally ahead of it (if there is an enemy piece occupying that square).

I just made my copy of the board yesterday, and have only had the opportunity to play-test the original rules.  But yeah, it was a lot of fun!  Thanks!


This item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2003-10-02
Tai ShogiThis item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2003-10-02
. Very large Shogi variant.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
ludokubo wrote on 2018-12-25 UTC

I am in love with many Japanese toys such as kendama, go, shogi and Hanayamas

Regards from Spain


This item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2017-12-02
 By Kevin  Pacey. Hannibal Chess. Chess with added Modern Elephants (ferz-alfil compound) on 10x8 board.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Joe Joyce wrote on 2018-12-18 UTC

Thank you, Kevin, and Ben is right, I do occasionally push the boundaries of chess a bit more than most, and also the definitions. To me, Hannibal is about the minimum acceptable change for a game. It adds a simple shortrange piece and changes the board minimally, just enough to fit the colorbound pair. The idea is minimal, the play is excellent. I meant it about this being a decent tourney game. It's straight-up hardnosed chess, no gimmicks.


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