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KMF's 12x12 Dozenal Chess. Adds rifle-capturing archers and royalty-inheriting princes.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Jean-Louis Cazaux wrote on 2021-10-21 UTC

“Rook” is a mistranslation of an Old Arabic word for “Siege Tower” Could you elaborate on this? I don't see what you mean.


Delta-Nabla Chess. (Updated!) Chess translated to a triangular grid as naturally as possible.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Jeff Cornell wrote on 2021-10-21 UTC

You understand correctly. Whether it's a feature or a bug is a matter of opinion I suppose. Pawns potentially getting stuck with only capturing moves is a natural consequence of a hexagonal board with players at opposite edges. Playtesting is probably the best way to determine whether that's an interesting new strategic consideration or just a nuisance.

If it is just a nuisance, then in place of castling, Delta-Nabla's own cludgy rule should probably be to give pawns the option of moving (without capturing) in the obliquely forward rook directions whenever they're not in a position to promote by moving directly forward, or perhaps only when the directly forward option is impossible due to reaching the board edge.


Pemba. (Updated!) Extension of Shako, with 60 pieces.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Jean-Louis Cazaux wrote on 2021-10-21 UTC

Dear Fergus

I'm glad you accept my first point.

For the second, you just repeat what I said, it is a name consistent with my tree of CV, so I don't see why you insist it is only consistent with myself. It is what I said. To elaborate more, I don't want to give another name to a piece I have used under this name on 6 or 7 other variants.

For the last and most interesting point, sure your objection is valid. Indeed a Bishop is not a Vao. But both are diagonal and this is just the starting point of the association I'm making. It is a thin point, but it is better than nothing and there are plenty CVs where there is no logic at all behind the naming of the pieces. The way you had chosen Arrow is very elegant, really. I have nothing against that. Few years ago when I was using a Vao I used to call it a Bowman, which is not so far from your idea. I have no problem you call this piece an Arrow, just let me call it a Crocodile if I like. (And Vao is not a good name imo, I would have say a Xao to look more Chinese and the X is better bearing the diagonal character than the V)

For the last point on Alfonso's codex, I worked very closely with Sonja Musser who got her PhD on this text and together we studied carefully the Spanish text (hablo español). Of course a Cocatrice is a mythical beast, and a Crocodile is a real animal. I know this. But in 1283 they didn't have Wikipedia, and behind many mythical beast there is sometimes a real animal, living in very remote lands, that could have inspired the legend. Interestingly, this is the case in this Codex with the Aanca, for the Unicornio and for the Cocatriz. About this animal the text says: E la otra que esta dell otro cabo del Rey a la mano derecha es a semeianca dela Cocatriz que es bestia & pescado. & esta es fecha como lagarto. & cria en las aguas dulces & sennalada mientre en el grant rio que llaman nilo. & ha tan grant fuerca que teniendo los dos pies de caga o la cola en el agua; no a cosa que tome en seco que non tire assi por fuerte que sea. & quando quiere tomar alguna cosa;

Sonja Musser translates as this: To the right of the [white] King is a Crocodile [The crocodile's piece is very realistically drawn] which is a beast and a fish like a lizard. It lives in fresh water, notably in the great river called the Nile. It is so strong that with two hind feet and its tail in the water that nothing it grabs on land can escape. Whenever it wants to grab something it pretends that it is looking somewhere else to lull it into a false sense of security and then it turns quickly and obliquely and goes after it until it captures it.

If you see a better description than a crocodile, tell us. The depiction I was talking about, and S.Musser is talking about, is the unique illustration that is known of this game, the one on the codex. Please refer to it, the drawing is small but it really looks like a crocodile. Everyone can check with good faith. We have this and no more than that.

Also you may understand that a given name of a mythical animal could refer to different representation for different people, different places, different times. A gryphon could have goat's legs here, a snake's tail there, etc.


Fergus Duniho wrote on 2021-10-21 UTC

this is my variant. I name the pieces as I like. Plenty of other chessvariants have names for their pieces that I don't like. I beg you to respect my choice

Agreed. I respect the right of game creators to use the piece names they wish to.

I use the name of Crocodile for the Vao for several of my variants already published here and on my site. So, I wish to be consistent in the tree of my variants. See Zanzibar-S, Zanzibar-L, Maasai Chess, Teramachy, Gigachess II, Terachess II, etc.

While consistency makes sense, it is only consistency with yourself, and you retain the right to rename the piece in all your variants if you desire to.

Saying it has no sense is wrong and upsetting.

It would be wrong to say that you had no reason for the name, because of course you did. I can't speak for Theresa, but I was aware, more or less, of your reason for the name Crocodile. I just don't think it is a good one.

In Grant Acedrex (from 1283) there is a Crocodile, named Cocatrice to be precise in medieval Spanish but which is depicted as a crocodile in that codex. This piece plays as a modern Bishop. The diagonal move is the inspiration for the name of Crocodile in my variants. You can estimate that this reason is weak but it is not "no sense".

Okay, it is weak, and I will now back that up. First of all, I disagree with the principal that it is a good idea to intentionally name a piece after a different piece that moves similarly to it. To be clear, this is different than accidentally giving a piece the same name as another piece or intentionally giving a piece the same name as another piece despite that name already being in use. I consider a name already being used for another piece a prima facie reason against using the name. But as long as you have other good reasons for using a name, these reasons may override this reason against using the name and independently justify the use of the name. In this case, though, you have no independent reasons for using the name Crocodile. Your only reason is that the name was used for the Bishop, which moves in the same directions as the Vao. Since I would count this as a reason against using the name rather than as a reason for using it, I do not consider this a good reason for using the name.

Second, you are using a translation of the original name, and I do not trust your translation. Cocatrice (or cocatriz as I actually found it spelled in the text of the Grant Acedrex) is not the Spanish word for crocodile, which is actually cocodrilo. Both spellings, cocatrice and cocatriz, are suspiciously close to cockatrice, which is a mythical serpentine beast or dragon with two legs and the head of a rooster, and when I search for either term, that is what I get articles on. Although you claim that the Grant Acedrex depicts the cocatrice as a crocodile, I did not find any depiction of it in the images we have of it on this site. But if you have images we don't have, I would be happy to see them. Additionally, the Grant Acedrex has included the names of other mythical animals that you have translated into the names of real animals, such as AAnca and Vnicornio. I am suspicious of those translations as well. Naming pieces after mythical animals has not been uncommon. So, if a name in a historic text looks like the name of a mythical animal, that may well be what it is.

Finally, I did have very good reasons for selecting the name Arrow. My first idea for a name was the punny name of Canon, which is a kind of cleric whose name sounds like Cannon. But it's not really a good name for the piece in a game that already includes a Cannon, and I also decided to give it a Chinese name. For that, I chose the character , whose meanings include both arrow and vow. The idea of an arrow fits with the idea of a cannon as a long-range projectile weapon that can go over the heads of others, and vow is a homonym for Vao, the name that the piece goes by in fairy chess.


The Sultan's Game. Variant on 11 by 11 board from 19th century Germany. (11x11, Cells: 121) [All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Bn Em wrote on 2021-10-21 UTC

Is that Tressau's interpretation? And do we know how much info the original sourcs gives on the matter?

After all if the latter does specify, as this article does, that both pieces move four spaces each, the Kc/i–Rd/h interpretation would make sense both in terms of preserving usual castling and lining up with the frequent use of inclusive counting (see also paragraph 4 of the Comments in Cazaux' page on Grant Acedrex)


Pemba. (Updated!) Extension of Shako, with 60 pieces.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Jean-Louis Cazaux wrote on 2021-10-21 UTC

Dear all. Few elements of answer:

  1. this is my variant. I name the pieces as I like. Plenty of other chessvariants have names for their pieces that I don't like. I beg you to respect my choice
  2. I use the name of Crocodile for the Vao for several of my variants already published here and on my site. So, I wish to be consistent in the tree of my variants. See Zanzibar-S, Zanzibar-L, Maasai Chess, Teramachy, Gigachess II, Terachess II, etc.
  3. Saying it has no sense is wrong and upsetting. In Grant Acedrex (from 1283) there is a Crocodile, named Cocatrice to be precise in medieval Spanish but which is depicted as a crocodile in that codex. This piece plays as a modern Bishop. The diagonal move is the inspiration for the name of Crocodile in my variants. You can estimate that this reason is weak but it is not "no sense".

Delta-Nabla Chess. (Updated!) Chess translated to a triangular grid as naturally as possible.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Ben Reiniger wrote on 2021-10-21 UTC

Do I understand correctly that the edge pawns cannot promote without capturing? Is that a feature or a bug?


Pemba. (Updated!) Extension of Shako, with 60 pieces.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Fergus Duniho wrote on 2021-10-21 UTC

Calling the diagonal Cannon a “Crocodile” makes zero sense. I prefer Gilman’s term for the piece: Arrow.

Agreed, except that I introduced the name of Arrow in Yang Qi, and Gilman copied it. See Comment 14476 on the Yang Qi page.


Theresa H. wrote on 2021-10-20 UTC

Calling the diagonal Cannon a “Crocodile” makes zero sense. I prefer Gilman’s term for the piece: Arrow.


The Sultan's Game. Variant on 11 by 11 board from 19th century Germany. (11x11, Cells: 121) [All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Georgi Markov wrote on 2021-10-20 UTC

K to b/j, R to c/i.


Bn Em wrote on 2021-10-20 UTC

When saying ‘four squares’, is that counted inclusively or exclusively? In the former case, both king and rook moving ‘four’ squares each would in fact land next to each other, on the bishops and adjutant's squares on the queenside and the marshall's and knight's on the commanderside.


Georgi Markov wrote on 2021-10-20 UTC

In fact, the rook - both here and in the Emperor's game - does end up next to the king. After Tressau's (and I believe this is the correct name, not Tressan: see Oettinger’s Bibliotheca Shahiludii) rules for the Sultan's game, K moves four squares towards R which lands on the adjacent square. Check the illustrative games in Tressau's book. I have a paper in press in the Board Game Studies Journal dealing with the Emperor's game and the Sultan's game which I hope will be published in 2022; will provide a link when it is.


Turkish Great Chess variation V. Large variant with three new pieces. (13x13, Cells: 169) [All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Georgi Markov wrote on 2021-10-20 UTC

The rules above seem to be seriously flawed due to a series of errors in the literature. Please check our paper with Stefan Härtel in Board Game Studies Journal 14, pp. 43-60: https://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/bgs-2020-0003


Russian fortress chess. An old Russian variant for four players. (Cells: 192) [All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Georgi Markov wrote on 2021-10-20 UTC

Please check my 2015 paper on this game in Board Game Studies Journal 9, pp. 41-49: http://bgsj.ludus-opuscula.org/PDF_Files/41_49_Markov_web.pdf

As for "Tchigorin, Capablanca and Lenin": photos of Ulyanov's chess table on the internet show a board with 160 squares, i.e. the western variant with 3 additional rows, and no fortresses. Information on Capablanca, I suspect, is due to mixing up double chess (which Capablanca did play indeed), and four-handed chess. No idea about Tchigorin but I doubt it.


Pandemonium (Surajang修羅場). (Updated!) Capablanca chess + Crazyhouse.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Daphne Snowmoon wrote on 2021-10-18 UTC

The overall design has been changed!

(Removed Chinese characters)


Pemba. (Updated!) Extension of Shako, with 60 pieces.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Jean-Louis Cazaux wrote on 2021-10-17 UTC

Dear editors I believe this page, Pemba, is ready to be published. Thank you


Jean-Louis Cazaux wrote on 2021-10-15 UTC

Dear editors I believe this page, Pemba, is ready to be published. Thank you


Tengu Dai Shogi. Turbo version of Dai Shogi, with some Dai Dai Shogi pieces.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Eric Silverman wrote on 2021-10-13 UTC

I've been working on implementing this game in Ai Ai, and have realised that there is an error in the write-up here: the Knight does not promote to Gold General in Tengu Dai Shogi, it promotes to a new piece which moves as a Chess Knight or as a Gold General. The text description and diagram are visible under the 桂馬:けいま heading on the original Japanese page.


Pandemonium (Surajang修羅場). (Updated!) Capablanca chess + Crazyhouse.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Daphne Snowmoon wrote on 2021-10-12 UTC

Added two puzzles!


Spherical Corner Chess. (Updated!) Game on a truly topologically spherical board with corner‐camp arrays.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Bn Em wrote on 2021-10-11 UTC

I believe this page to now be ready for publication


Hectochess. 10x10 variant that can be played with 2 mismatched Chess sets.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Adam DeWitt wrote on 2021-10-08 UTC

This game was a bit neglected on my part for a while, partly because of my interest in large Shogi variants and the long process of experimentation with the Suzumu Fire Demon's move. Now that those are out of the way, I have decided to give this page a facelift. I have added an interactive diagram to this page and updated its images to keep its style in line with the rules pages for Yangsi and Ryugi, and I did some double-checking to make sure the rules were in line with those of Yangsi and Ryugi. I also fixed a few typos in the ruleset references for the Hectochess and Ryugi presets.

Now all that is left is the difficult tasks of implementing the Suzumu Fire Demon's burning move in Game Courier, implementing the Lion Dog in Game Courier (for the larger games in the Suzumu family), and figuring out how to implement Cannon Shosu Shogi in Game Courier (The hopping moves make it impossible to use the code I used for Shosu Shogi and Futashikana Shogi).


Ryugi. 10x10 variant with Kirins, Marshalls, and Dragons, the latter which can move as a Bishop or as a Nightrider.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Adam DeWitt wrote on 2021-10-08 UTC

I've added the implementation in the Interactive Diagram. Still need to add it in Game Courier though.

Edit: Apparently by happy accident, the Game Courier preset had this implemented already without me realizing it.


Pandemonium (Surajang修羅場). (Updated!) Capablanca chess + Crazyhouse.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Daphne Snowmoon wrote on 2021-10-07 UTC

Very little content, but once I added Casting and Opening.


Grand Apothecary Chess-Classic. Very large Board variant obtained trough tinkering with known games.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Aurelian Florea wrote on 2021-10-07 UTC

HG, If you are here please check my previous comments on this post!


Shatranj With Different Armies. Like Chess with Different Armies, but for Shatranj.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Andrew L Smith wrote on 2021-10-06 UTC

I believe this is now ready to be published.


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