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This item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2003-06-15
 Author: Isao  Umebayashi and Larry L. Smith. Taikyoku Shogi. Taikyoku Shogi. Extremely large shogi variant. (36x36, Cells: 1296) [All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Jeremy Hook wrote on 2015-12-30 UTC
Would you please send me the price list? Thanks! ([email protected])

John Lawson wrote on 2015-12-23 UTC
I have MS Office both at home and work, so I could likely read the file and translate to another format if you send it to me. The email account in my member record is still current.

H. G. Muller wrote on 2015-12-23 UTC
You could be right. As I said, I am not able to read the price list, as it is in .doc format. I just thought he supplied equipment for all variants described in his leaflets.

John Lawson wrote on 2015-12-23 UTC
I have been out of touch for years, but I don't think George ever made Taikyoku sets. Tai Shogi sets for sure, since I have one, but none larger.

H. G. Muller wrote on 2015-12-22 UTC
Sorry, my bad. The domain was talk21.com, not talk12.com. <p> George died for sure, but his widow, Angela Hodges, continues his business. I ordered a CD-ROM with the Middle Shogi Manual from here last year. I still have the pricelists in both euros and sterling attached to the e-mails, but they are .doc files, so I cannot read them. So I cannot tell you off hand whether taikyoku sets are still in supply, and what the prices are.

John Lawson wrote on 2015-12-22 UTC
George Hodges died about five years ago.

Jeremy Hook wrote on 2015-12-21 UTC
The image you gave is one of the board after set-up; However, the pieces in Taikyokushogi are double-sided. I have sent an email to the address you suggested. We'll see. The other thing is that I'm on a somewhat tight budget. I will get back to you as to Mr. Hodges. Oh, look! I just got an email that said that the message was not delivered as the address wasn't valid. If you know anything about this, please tell me.

H. G. Muller wrote on 2015-12-19 UTC
> <i>Actually I am having to make my own board, hand drawing all the symbols on paper pieces, because no-one sells them in any way, shape, or form.</i> <p> Uh? Are they sold out at The Shogi Association? ( [email protected] ) <p> Drawing by hand also seems unnecessary; there are on-line versions available that you could print out. E.G. <a href="http://fc04.deviantart.net/fs70/i/2011/041/b/1/taikyoku_shogi_2_by_tkr101010-d399ucj.png">here</a>.

Jeremy Hook wrote on 2015-12-19 UTCGood ★★★★
Actually I am having to make my own board, hand drawing all the symbols on paper pieces, because no-one sells them in any way, shape, or form. Another thing is that if you google Taikyoku shogi in addition to a couple of images of your search,you will get a lot of images of Tai shogi, which is actually played enough to mention as more than a historic curiosity. Tai shogi is played on a "mere" 25x25 board, but the players still have to use tongs to reach the other side of the board. I was telling my grandmother about Taikyoku shogi, and she suggested that the reason that it disappeared and was forgotten about is that the "three people who played it died". There is no evidence that it was ever widely played. Wonder why. There is however one (1!) youtube video of it.

Jeremy Hook wrote on 2015-12-19 UTCGood ★★★★
Actually I am having to make my own board, hand drawing all the symbols on paper pieces, because no-one sells them in any way, shape, or form. Another thing is that if you google Taikyoku shogi in addition to a couple of images of your search,you will get a lot of images of Tai shogi, which is actually played enough to mention as more than a historic curiosity. Tai shogi is played on a "mere" 25x25 board, but the players still have to use tongs to reach the other side of the board. I was telling my grandmother about Taikyoku shogi, and she suggested that the reason that it disappeared and was forgotten about is that the "three people who played it died". There is no evidence that it was ever widely played. Wonder why. There is however one (1!) youtube video of it.

George Duke wrote on 2015-03-16 UTC
One list of pieces to draw from, to find Predators. And another: http://www.chessvariants.org/index/msdisplay.php?itemid=MSfairypiecespar.

Chris Witham wrote on 2011-01-12 UTC
A step would be one square, so 'five steps' would be five squares in that direction. Stepping is not jumping (it's more like sliding with a limited range) so stepping moves can be blocked the same way a bishop or rook's move can be blocked.

Christine Bagley-Jones wrote on 2011-01-12 UTC
heya, no, i looked at the piece movements and 'steps' cant be just for a single square move, for instance ... Free Demon: steps 5 forward orthogonal or backward orthogonal, slides left orthogonal or right orthogonal or diagonal.

Nicholas Wolff wrote on 2011-01-12 UTC
Step, to my understanding, means just moving one square, like an orthodox King. Slide would be what a bishop or a rook does. Jumping is for Knights, etc. You can google some interesting photos of taikyoku shogi boards. They are HUGE! I would not doubt that you'd have to crawl over a board to make a move.

Christine Bagley-Jones wrote on 2011-01-12 UTCExcellent ★★★★★
hey, u would have to walk on the board to make move would u? (lol) love how big it is, probably would be hell to play :) what is the difference between 'step' and 'slide', is 'step' different from 'leap', i dont kinda understand.

Nicholas Wolff wrote on 2011-01-06 UTC
Mats, I agree that the game itself is complicated, much like many variants found on this site, but I hardly think it is apalling. Mankind naturally gravitates towards bigger and better things. Considering that this was played in the 1600's, it probably was eccentric for its time, but I think after its rediscovery in 1997, it has put a spark in at least some people, including myself. To play and finish a game on the world's largest board game would be the equivalent of a runner training for a marathon, which less than one percent of the world has completed. Apalling... I wouldn't classify it as that. Eccentric... even now, to a degree. Complicated... undoubtedly. Intriguing... to me it is.

M Winther wrote on 2011-01-05 UTCPoor ★
I think it's appalling. It is incredibly over the top complicated and makes no sense at all. /Mats

Nicholas Wolff wrote on 2011-01-05 UTC
For the longest time, I have been trying to come up with some way to play this. I have tried excel documents, etc. I finally gave up because there are so many different translations to the pieces/rules that you'd be playing a different game just about every game you play. VERY interesting concept, though.. If someone came up with something, I'd be interested in playing it.

Hafsteinn Kjartansson wrote on 2010-12-31 UTC
It is H U G E!!

etuy wrote on 2010-12-08 UTC
RE:flowerman This is the biggest board game

Hafsteinn Kjartansson wrote on 2010-06-29 UTCExcellent ★★★★★
According to http://taikyokushogi.hp.infoseek.co.jp/taikyoku.swf, this mark -|-|-|-> means 'may jump over three pieces on its way'. In this link, get the piece that starts at 20 32 out on the board and look at the forward-diagonal moves: it may move four spaces into the opponents start row, jumping over three pieces- or one, or two, jumping over one, or three, jumping over two.

Fergus Duniho wrote on 2010-02-16 UTC

The biggest Chess variant I know of is David Howe's Mega Chess. At the end, he briefly describes some variants of it that may be even bigger, but the descriptions aren't detailed enough for me to understand them.


Flowerman wrote on 2010-02-16 UTC
What is the biggest variant of shogi?! And what is the biggest variant of chess at all?

¹ù wrote on 2010-02-10 UTC
you typed the promoted the 'flying goose' as DRAGON KING(!)

playshogi wrote on 2009-01-31 UTC
Where can you buy the book 'sekai no shogi'?

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