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Comments by Erez Schatz

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Halloween Chess. Chess with 5 new, Halloween-themed pieces! (13x13, Cells: 169) [All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Erez Schatz wrote on 2008-11-03 UTC
Not to be confused with my own Vampire from AtTENdance Chess and Treeleaders Chess which is an almost, but not entirely, completely different piece.

Attendance Chess. 10 piece types that can move to 10 squares each, mostly. (10x10, Cells: 100) [All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Erez Schatz wrote on 2005-07-03 UTC
A learning curve is the amount of time and effort one has to invest in
order to 'get the grip' of a game. Mind you, we are not talking about
mastering it or becoming well adept, just how long until you can play the
game without having to screen the rules for every rule and missing attack
lines etc. A game with a high learning curve is a difficult game to learn
(like Chu-Shogi), while a shallow curve means it's a 'pick up and play'
kind of game (Smess comes to mind). 
Another thing to consider is 'who is your target audience'. Whether you
direct your variant to a target audience that is new to chess, or to
players who know chess, but are not familiar with variants, or to those
who are familiar with both. The expected learning curve changes
accordingly.

Erez Schatz wrote on 2005-07-02 UTC
You do have a point. I never did claim to be a mathematician, though.

Erez Schatz wrote on 2005-07-01 UTC
Thanks for your comments, it always helps to know what people who play my
games think.

The King has only 2 knight moves. This means that it has a potential of 10
squares it can reach (assuming it hadn't used any square move and is
located in the middle of an empty board). Once it executed both his knight
moves, he has only the usual 8 squares.

The Vampire can only move by leaping over exactly one piece (enemy or
friendly). It is the diagonal equivalent of the Cannon's capturing move,
only that the Vampire cannot capture by displacement, meaning it cannot
land on an occupied square.  It can capture a piece located in an
orthogonally adjacent square. Note that the Vampire doesn't need to move
in order to capture (it immediately threatens the four adjacent squares),
and it can also capture after making a move, but not vice versa (i.e. it
can move, capture, or move and capture, but not capture and move). The
Vampire is colour-bound to black, and while very threatening, it becomes
'crippled' quite easily by either blocking its way with 2 pieces, or
removing the piece from its way.
For other examples of the Vampire, or it's brother piece, feel free to
try any of my other variants.

When I design a game, I usually try not to create a very steep learning
curve, although you can say that none of my variants is 'newbie
friendly' and assume a certain degree of familiarity with Chess and Chess
Variants. I believe that for that type of player, this variant does not
have a high learning curve. It may not be a 'pick up and play' kind of
variant, but, to be honest, so are 90% of the variants in this site,
including Shataranj, not to mention the far eastern variants which have
quite a steep curve (especially Shogi). 

I personally really like small range pieces, and I find that utilizing
them on a large board makes for an interesting opening stages where the
players can strategically form their battle ranks begin the actual
skirmish. It's something I've always tried to implement with my
variants, you can see it in Med Chess, Infantry Chess, and Orthogonal
Chess44.

I believe more in 'pieces balance' rather than 'complementing'.
Meaning there should be an overall balance between the pieces, giving
every piece strengths and weaknesses, which in the overall doesn't allow
a certain piece to overwhelm the game. For instance, Chess' pieces are
complementing, but hardly balanced, while Shataranj's are balanced, but
not very complementing. I'm sorry to say that I did miss a spot here
regarding this issue, with the Vampire, which should've been an Assassin,
this will be fixed in the post tournament version of the game.

I think that once you try playing the game for several rounds, you might
change your initial opinion, or you'll have more criticism, either way,
It'll be my gain :). Thanks again for your info!

AtTENdance Chess ZIP file. Missing description[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Erez Schatz wrote on 2005-05-30 UTC
This zrf was the first I wrote, and while it contains all of the element of the game, I believe it misses on one point, and that's promoting, I've found no solid example to follow on this matter, if anyone has any idea on how to properly implement promotion according to the rules of the variant, I'll be much appreciative.

Oblong Chess 44 ZIP file. Missing description[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Erez Schatz wrote on 2005-05-30 UTC
Well, this is my first zrf implementation (Actually, my second, but it was finished before my first, so there). I would really appreciate any comments, ideas, improvements, etc., both to the game and to the script.

Attendance Chess. 10 piece types that can move to 10 squares each, mostly. (10x10, Cells: 100) [All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Erez Schatz wrote on 2005-05-06 UTC
It can promote to any other piece, bar the King and the Vampire, as long as the player already lost one piece of that type. Assuming the pawn reaches the last row, and there are still two rooks in the game, but one bishop, no Centurion, no Wizzar and one BattleMech, then the Pawn can promote to _any_ of those pieces.

Erez Schatz wrote on 2005-05-06 UTC
You may also notice that the game was posted at 05/05, which makes ten, at
the year 2005 or 2X5...

I also want to clarify the rules of promotion. 
'When a pawn reaches the 10th row, it immediately promotes to any piece
except the King or the Vampire.'
'only when the player already lost a piece of the type. A player can't
have more than 2 pieces of any type, and no more than one Centurion.'
Those two rules aren't exclusive, but apply to each other. A Pawn
reaching the last row must promote to any piece, as long as that piece has
been captured.

Contest to design a chess variant on 44 squares. Our annual N-squares chess variant design competition.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Erez Schatz wrote on 2004-12-17 UTC
I'll leave the disqualified issue alone then :)

I have to say that although the finalists and the winners very much
reflect my votes in the contest, I'm very disappointed that Inside-out
chess didn't get more votes and that Hole Chess wasn't named among the
winners. I found both games to be quite entertaining in playtesting. I
have also played Hole Chess a couple of times on the Game Courier since my
original votes and it is still quite enjoyable.

Erez Schatz wrote on 2004-12-12 UTC
Congratulations to the winners. This had been a fun competition.
Can you elaborate on who got disqualified? There was a bit of trouble with
the mail previously, and could be that there are those who sent their votes
but didn't get through.

Canyon Chess. Small variant with Marshalls and Archbishops and some new rules. (8x8, Cells: 44) [All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Erez Schatz wrote on 2004-10-21 UTC
I agree. Although it wasn't one of my favourite games, I wouldn't rush to
lable it 'poor'. I think the board and the pieces placement was quite
nice, my quirk with it is that there are too much power pieces located on
what is a very small and limited board. I agree it is a manner of taste, I
use very restricted pieces in my small board designs, but if one likes to
play a game of power, kill-or-be-killed, then this variant offers a nice
solution.

There does seem to be a problem with the image, though.

Contest to design a chess variant on 44 squares. Our annual N-squares chess variant design competition.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Erez Schatz wrote on 2004-10-08 UTC
So far I've not been able to send my votes to either [email protected], or [email protected], nor any other variation on the theme.

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