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This item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2000-07-31
 Author: David  Howe. Inventor: Jeff  Kiska. Test Page. Missing description[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
David Howe wrote on 2002-03-30 UTCGood ★★★★
New commenting system created!

David Howe wrote on 2002-03-31 UTCGood ★★★★
Just testing with another comment. The new commenting system allows comments with or without <b>HTML</b> tags.<hr>--DH

This item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2002-03-28
 By Samuel H. Bell. Regulator Chess. Game on a 35 square board with a 7 square track on which a piece moves that determines how Knights and Bishops can move. (6x7, Cells: 42) [All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Anonymous wrote on 2002-04-01 UTCExcellent ★★★★★
excellent!

This item is a miscellaneous item
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2002-04-01
 Author: David  Howe. General Comments Page. Page for making general comments.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Peter Aronson wrote on 2002-04-01 UTCExcellent ★★★★★
Thanks for the space, David (my mind, <em>tidy</em>? -- now there's a strange concept!). <p>[I'd have said you had a beautiful mind, but that phrase was already taken. --DH]

gnohmon wrote on 2002-04-02 UTCExcellent ★★★★★
What about ratings abysmal, mediocre, and superb?

Keeping the discussion alive alive O, I always thot that cockles were a
type of dialectic seafood, suitable for the musselbound.

However, if in doubt, the question can be submitted to alt.usage.english, a
font of linguistic wisdom.

Submit without review is not necessary as long as it is made obvious that
submit can be found within review: we are accustomed to pesky and insecure
programs asking us 'are you sure, are you really reaaly sure, should I do
what you said or are you a jerk?

99 and 44/100ths, not 99.4; Ivory Soap (tm). It's your turn in the barrel,
as Safire recently apologized for saying -- the phrase is the punchline of
a *dirty* joke, you see.

Many adages and colloquialisms come from jokes or from Ad Age; and they are
ephemeral, for example who today would know what ad agency I one worked for
if I specify that it sounds like a suitcase falling down a flight of
stairs, as Marcel Duchamp once said. Oh, sorry, it was Fred Allen who said
it.

As comedians in the Borscht Belt once asked, 'Where's the beet?'

Back to topic, how can there be a Comdey Chess, in which every move is a
joke??

gnohmon wrote on 2002-04-02 UTCExcellent ★★★★★
Perhaps html mode does not work. I see no link about cockles. <P> It should be noted that those who use an invisible smiley must make arrangements to pay a null royalty to me. It was I who invented it, for use in afu. <P> I will type in a <A HREF=http://www.lynx.browser.org/>link</a> to test html-mode comments.

gnohmon wrote on 2002-04-02 UTCPoor ★
if a comment is submitted in html mode, its left margin is indented.
<P>
Non-html comments start at page left.
<P>
The above is true when viewing with lynx. Your mileage may vary if you
use
any of the inferior alternatives.
<P>

gnohmon wrote on 2002-04-02 UTCPoor ★
if a comment is submitted in non-html mode, things that appear to be html
tags are not printed. Are they interpreted? here's an hr:<HR>
<P>
The previous line appears blank but contained left-angle-bracket. P,
right-angle-bracket.
<P>
This is inconsistent behavior.

gnohmon wrote on 2002-04-02 UTCPoor ★
if a comment is submitted in non-html mode, things that appear to be html
tags are not printed. But the preview prints them!!!
<P>
The previous line appears blank but contained left-angle-bracket. P,
right-angle-bracket. In preview mode, I saw the html tag, but when viewing
comments I see a blank line.
<P>
This is inconsistent behavior.

gnohmon wrote on 2002-04-02 UTCExcellent ★★★★★
Most of the recent flood of commants/feebback was caused by my article on
''Chatter Chess'''', which has not yet been seen.
<P>
Imagine what may happen if chatter chess ever sees the light of day, will
the comment system be able to handle such volume?
<P>
These are important considerations....
<P>
<Blink>

This item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 1996-02-09
 Author: Hans L. Bodlaender. Inventor: Walter  Stead. Grid Chess. Always move to a different 2 by 2 square part of the board. (8x8, Cells: 64) [All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
gnohmon wrote on 2002-04-02 UTCPoor ★
The comment system says 'skip to comments' but there are no comments.

This game should not be described without mentioning U-Grid Chess, and
also
Betza's Pinwheel Chess (and Orbital Rotating Grid and so forth).

This item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2002-03-02
 By Ralph  Betza. Archoniclastic Chess. Pieces are augmented on squares of their color. (8x8, Cells: 64) [All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
PBA wrote on 2002-03-26 UTCExcellent ★★★★★
The world obviously needs more Augmented Chess variants! I wonder, though, if moving this to a 10x10 board where Camels/Long Knights (and maybe (3,3) leapers) are not out of place would allow a more natural selection of Augmenters. <p>PBA

This item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2002-02-04
 By Jared B. McComb. Danadazo. Game played on the 47 edges of a grid with rounded corners, borrowing elements from Tafl. (Cells: 47) [All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
PBA wrote on 2002-03-26 UTCExcellent ★★★★★
I do like the idea of playing on edges as opposed to points or cells. It really does give a different topology. <p>PBA

This item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2013-03-25
 Author: Edward  Jackman and Fergus  Duniho. Inventor: Vernon Rylands Parton. Alice Chess. Classic Variant where pieces switch between two boards whenever they move. (8x8x2, Cells: 128) (Recognized!)[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Daniel wrote on 2002-03-29 UTCGood ★★★★
Make your pages have a 'printer option!' That way I could take your data
home with me and actually use it!! Also, put a 'home' buttin at the
bottom
of each page, it would make site navigation easier... Thanks, Daniel

This item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2001-03-20
 Author: Hans L. Bodlaender. Chessgi. Drop the pieces you take from your opponent. (8x8, Cells: 64) [All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Chad wrote on 2002-04-02 UTCExcellent ★★★★★
You can play this game at <a href='http://www.goldtoken.com'>GoldToken.com</a>.

This item is a miscellaneous item
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2002-04-01
 Author: David  Howe. General Comments Page. Page for making general comments.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Tony Quintanilla wrote on 2002-04-02 UTCExcellent ★★★★★
David, Peter, great idea! This makes it easy to comment, is practical, timely, and should have a wide audience.

This item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2002-01-07
 By Peter  Aronson. Chaturanga 4-84. An Updating of Chaturanga for Four Players with modern pieces and an 84-square board. (10x10, Cells: 84) [All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Tony Quintanilla wrote on 2002-04-03 UTCExcellent ★★★★★
Very nice game. It is highly playable. Very enjoyable. The double teams
interact in a cooperative way. The board is interesting to play on,
especially with the center squares which change your piece types.
   Although the game harkens back to Chaturanga, even the 4-player version
of Chaturanga, and other 4-player games, there is a lot on ingenuity here.
The idea of changing piece type in the center adds some of the ancient
flavor too. The double team environment in-itself adds a new element in
many ways.
   The rules are simple to grasp. Traditional chess moves are used, along
with the ancient moves in the center. The center, of course, alludes to the
traditional struggle in chess to capture the center.
The game is very nice. By that I mean that it is graceful and evocative.
   Nice game. Try it!

This item is a miscellaneous item
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2002-04-01
 Author: David  Howe. General Comments Page. Page for making general comments.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
gnohmon wrote on 2002-04-03 UTCExcellent ★★★★★
If you think Ruddigore Chess seems playable, by all means test a bit more
and write it up! You're the inventor. I just blathered away with a crude
sketch of the rules and a crazy suggestion, you saw the possibilities and
found the specific rule-set that makes it work -- in other words, you do
all the hard work, it's your game.
<P>
You'll mention me, of course, but you know I would never have pursued the
idea further...

This item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2002-01-07
 By Peter  Aronson. Chaturanga 4-84. An Updating of Chaturanga for Four Players with modern pieces and an 84-square board. (10x10, Cells: 84) [All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
gnohmon wrote on 2002-04-03 UTCExcellent ★★★★★
I have no idea whether or not it's really playable, but judging purely by
the text, the number of ingredients in the recipes, and the quality and
amount of spices, I would have to guess that this is a very fine piece of
work.

Applause.

This item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2008-12-18
 Author: Hans L. Bodlaender and Fergus  Duniho. Chinese Chess. Links and rules for Xiangqi (Chinese Chess). (9x10, Cells: 90) (Recognized!)[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
willem wrote on 2002-04-03 UTCGood ★★★★

This item is a miscellaneous item
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2002-04-01
 Author: David  Howe. General Comments Page. Page for making general comments.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
gnohmon wrote on 2002-04-05 UTCExcellent ★★★★★
The comment system allows you to see the whole discussion on one page,
instead of needing to access (and then page down past all the garbage) a
new page for each message.

This is a huge advantage, and I expect that people will abandon the yahoo
thingy and flock to the chessvariants.com comment pages.

This item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2002-04-05
 By Ralph  Betza. Chatter Chess. Variant based on the idea of line chatter where rider pieces can switch to other friendly pieces' lines of movement. (8x8, Cells: 64) [All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Peter Aronson wrote on 2002-04-05 UTCExcellent ★★★★★
You know, I can't see any reason (aside from restraint) why stepping pieces couldn't take advantage of chatter even if they can't create it (sort of like a low-power line mixed in with higher-power lines). Then, if a stepper could move to a square containing a rider's line, it could ride away on it! In that case, castling and Pawn-double-step could definitely generate chatter lines (and we'd have to distinguish between capturing and non-capturing chatter lines). Of course, chasing down a King supported by a Bishop could be rather difficult . . . <p> The above would probably result in a fairly crazy game, but it would also come closer to working with different armies. <p> And for the list of possibly unplayable games, I'd like to add <u><a href='../d.betza/chessvar/confu01.html'>Confusion 1b</a> Chatter Chess</u>.

gnohmon wrote on 2002-04-06 UTCExcellent ★★★★★
People should know that the excellent diagram that makes it so easy to
visualize the chatter moves was added by the editor, not the author.

The editor gets an 'excellent' rating for this page.

This item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 1999-05-08
Omega Chess. Rules for commercial chess variant on board with 104 squares. (12x12, Cells: 104) (Recognized!)[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
David Short wrote on 2002-04-06 UTCExcellent ★★★★★
I would like to announce that I am going to be running an Omegachess
tournament by email on Richard's Play By Email server at
http://www.gamerz.net/pbmserv
In order to play in the tournament you must have a PBM userid.
Check out http://www.gamerz.net/tutorial.html and
http://www.gamerz.net/commands.html 
if you are new and want to sign up for a free userid and password
on the server. You do not have to have ever played Omegachess before
on the server to compete in this tournament. If you would like to play
in the event please email me your PBM userid to [email protected]
I have not yet decided exactly how I am going to structure the Omega
tournament. It will probably be a round robin tournament, with between
4 to 8 games in the first round, and a certain number of players 
advancing to a second and final round.

I would also like to announce that I am also going to run a chess
tournament on PBM too. This is traditional orthodox chess!
This tournament is open to the first 25 players who email me to enter.
I will be creating five 5-man sections. Each player will play a total
of 4 games, 2 as white and 2 as black, one game against each of the
other players in the tournament. The 5 section winners will then
advance to a final 5-man section for the championship of the tournament.
In the event of a tie for first place in a section the first tiebreaker
is head-to-head result. In the event of a draw or a 3-way tie where
A beat B, B beat C and C beat A, all tied players advance to the finals
and a larger final section will be created. Again, to compete in this
tournament you must have a PBM userid. You may enter both tournaments
if you like. When emailing me please make sure to specify which
tournament you are entering. Thanks again and good luck!!

This item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2000-06-23
 Author: Hans L. Bodlaender. Rules of Chess. This is how modern chess was originally referred to in the late 15th century. (8x8, Cells: 64) (Recognized!)[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Jere wrote on 2002-04-06 UTCExcellent ★★★★★
I had not played chess in 40 years. It was a great refresher; covered all the rules in a straight-forward manner. Nice job.

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