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Jewel: A Linked-series of Games

Introduction

Jewel: (aka Keys in Time) is a series of games, some of which can be described as Convergence games. The games are structured as “Facets” which are basically levels and consist of: 1. Facet 1: Duel in the Castle – a Beginner’s game 2. Facet 2: Ambush in the Forest – a Mini game 3. Facet 3: Northern Light – a Treasure Hunt 4. Facet 4: Crystal of Doom 5. Facet 5: Star-Lords Also there is the series Tie-break game called Race © Copyright G. Nicholls 2015/16 Notes: Games can be played in three ways as follows: 1. As Stand-alone games. 2. As a Linked-series of games. 3. As a Tie-break game(s). The mechanics of playing the games are described as for Stand-alone games and then the changes or adjustments for a Linked-series of games or a Tie-break game are explained separately. Northern Light is the Tie-break game(s) for The Dragon Trilogy (See Games by Groupings). The Boards for each consecutive Facet are called as follows: Jewel: Key-board 1 Jewel: Key-board 2 Jewel: Key-board 3 and so on, but they may also have a descriptive name as stated below under the individual game. For times see the Chronology in Games by Groupings. Piece moves: The King's Lancer can move or capture one or two squares vertically or horizontally and he can jump. The Queen's Lancer can move or capture one or two squares diagonally and he can jump. A Cloaked Prince moves and captures with the combined powers of a Queen's Lancer and a Western Chess Knight. All other pieces move as their Western Chess equivalents as stated in the individual games. Keys in Time preface - Deadlock: The time is shortly after Stones of Fortune (If) The varied Conflicts and Battles of The Dragon Trilogy (see Games by Groupings) have, perhaps surprisingly, produced no clear victory or resolution and now various Conflicts involving many others will, it seems, repeat themselves yet again with another series of Conflicts collectively known as Jewel. This time however, there must be a victory for one side or the other..... And there is only a short time before Jewel will commence..... The Players (Sides): The Green TimeLord who plays the various Green Characters of the Facets. And The Red TimeLord who plays the various Red Characters of the Facets. There may be alternate names given to games, players, boards, settings or characters or choosing of sides, as stated below under the individual games depending on whether the game is played as a Stand-alone, a Linked-series or a Tie-break game(s). When Jewel or part thereof is played as a Linked-series or a Tie-break game(s) then Players (Individual or member of a Team) roll a standard dice or coin to see which TimeLord they will be and they stay as that same TimeLord throughout all Facets. Keys in Time prologue – The Turning of the Key: .....During the Battle in the Dark Realm, as within the Middle Kingdoms previously (see Games by Groupings - The Dragon Trilogy), there were set against each other talismanic objects of unique and rare power and the Stones of Fortune (which some call the TigerStones) were, for the first time, set against each other - Light versus Dark; and in addition the Sword Excalibur was set directly against the Golden Axe. This unprecedented Clash of Talismans of such power has led to a series of upheavals that are now beginning to make themselves known. Had The Dragon Trilogy been resolved then matters would possibly have quickly settled back to their quiet and mostly forgotten state; but the unresolved Battles have led to a permanent wrench (which will shortly come to be named The Great Rift but is currently and will as well also be called The Corridor through Time) in what was the relatively peaceful balance of age-long myths and legends, and that means ancient Conflicts will inevitably now arise.....yet again..... Playing the Games: Jewel Facet 1: Duel in the Castle – A Beginner’s game. Keys in Time 1 – The Forest awakes: The time of Duel in the Castle is early in The Era of Constraint. It was said that the Forest and nearly all its Inhabitants and Animals had slept for a hundred years or more, for nothing else could save the Princess from the Witch’s spell and the Princess was still asleep upstairs in a Castle in the Forest, and nothing that was still awake had entered the Forest during this time as there was an overwhelming feeling of decay and hopelessness. The legend grew that only if the Princess awoke again would the former life and vitality of the Forest return, but she could not, it was said, awaken of her own accord but would need the help of the Prince of the Forest to break the spell of the Witch and then she would awaken. The Prince however had himself fallen into a deep sleep and showed no sign of awakening. But eventually there were stirrings of new growth and with this came a feeling of spring and the expectancy perhaps of better things to come and so finally some of the Animals of the Forest began to become active followed by some of the Inhabitants and then by the Prince and finally by others. But many could not awake, including the Princess who could not break the Witch’s spell. The Prince learned of the whereabouts of the Princess and resolved to break the spell cast on her by the Witch and so bring the Princess and the Forest back to their full life and vitality. After overcoming many obstacles and expelling the Witch from the Forest the Prince finally entered the Castle where the Princess was being kept but who was still in a near coma-like sleep. Unexpectedly though, the Prince came across a Guard (a servant of the Witch) at the foot of the stairs leading up to the Princess’s room and the Guard was armed with a Sword and determined not to let anyone see the Princess. And so there was a Duel fought between the Prince (also armed with a Sword) and the armed Guard (see game below), but the Guard was it seems himself somewhat sleepy and soon made a beginner’s error in the Duel by rushing onto the stairs which allowed the Prince to disarm him and so to gain access to the stairs and to reach and help the Princess. And so it was that the Forest and all its Inhabitants and Animals came back to their full life and vitality and the Forest would grow and thrive and one day become known as The Forest Kingdom (see Dragon) and which would eventually extend all the way to the Ocean. Object: For Duel in the Castle the object is to “Hold the Key” (B2) and this wins the Duel (game). The Game is usually called just Duel and can be described as a Convergence game. Settings: For Duel in the Castle, there is a Castle which is in a Forest and the centre of the Castle is the Key Position (B2), which are stairs. The board can be called the “Castle board”. The Board & Characters: The Play: Of the two Characters, who move alternately, Red moves first, and both move as a King’s Lancer does (see various games e.g. TigerChess) and so they can jump across the B2 square (position) whereas this position would block (see Facet 3: Northern Light) the move of a sliding piece such as a Rook or Bishop of Western Chess. The object of the game is to “Hold the Key position” or simply to “Hold the Key” and this requires two objectives to be met: 1. A Character needs to have reached and occupied the Key Position which is the B2 position. 2. This Character must Hold the Key position for the next turn of his opponent. This means that his opponent must capture him immediately or lose the game. If he does capture him then he would then himself have reached and occupied the Key Position and would himself win the game - there being no opposing Character left to then capture him. An example of a win would be: 1. Red C1 to B1 Green A3 to C3 2. Red B1 to B2 and wins Red has reached and occupied the Key Position and Green cannot capture Red on his next turn and so Red Holds the Key Position whatever move Green were to make. Red then has won the game. Another example (see “The Forest awakes” above) of a win would be: 1. Red C1 to B1 Green A3 to A2 2. Red B1 to B2 Red has reached and occupied the Key Position but Green can now capture him Green on A2 captures (disarms) Red on B2 and wins Green has reached and occupied the Key Position and Red having been captured cannot of course capture Green. Green has then won the game by Holding the Key position. If a Character has captured his opposing Character but is not occupying the Key position then he may carry on moving until he does occupy the Key Position - otherwise Characters must move alternately. It is not possible to force anything more than a draw as follows: 1. Red has four possible starting moves but two lose quickly i.e. to move to A1 or C3. He would be captured here and if captured on A1 for example Green would then move to e.g. A2 and then to B2 and so win. 2. The other two possible moves come to similar outcomes – if e.g. Red moves to C2 then Green must move to B3 or lose the game and Red must now jump to A2 or he will lose the game. Green must now jump to B1 or he loses the game and now both Characters must jump backwards and forwards to the same two positions or they would lose. The game ends by threefold repetition of moves/position. Scores: For Duel in the Castle the score is one Game Point for a win and a half Game Point each for a draw – but only for the first time of a player’s playing; thereafter no Points, Chords or marks are awarded to the player when Duel is played as a Stand-alone game (but see Scores section in Ambush in the Forest). Clocks: For Duel in the Castle each player has five or ten minutes on a single countdown clock. Each move is time-lagged by five seconds. Notes: 1. Draws include threefold repetition of moves/position. 2. Players may simply be called the Green Player or the Red Player. Jewel Facet 2: Ambush in the Forest – A Mini game. Keys in Time 2 – A Tax too far: The time of Ambush in the Forest is many centuries before The Great Change. The one-time Noble, but now turned outlaw, prepared to loose the arrow of his longbow, but the target was not a person but a tree in the path of a hurrying armed troop of a King’s Sheriff and the rules of chivalry demanded that the Longbowman give fair warning of the intended attack he was about to begin. The shot, though distant, was an easy one for the Longbowman who was considered possibly the finest archer in the entire (Disputed) Realm and he had indeed won the inaugural all-Realm Archery Tournament held just a short time earlier. The causes of the attack about to take place had their origin some years previously when the most powerful King amongst the disputing Kings and Nobles of the Realm took up a cause in far distant lands but found the cost of his venture way beyond even his means to pay. This King, convinced of the necessity of his cause, decided to partly finance his coming expedition (which some are convinced led to the discovery of the Light and Dark Stones – see Overview in TigerQuest in Chess from Draughts etc.) by means of taxing those Inhabitants who were under his rule. This heavy tax was forced into being with little support from others of the Nobility and was hugely unpopular amongst those who had to pay for it as they found the tax a great burden and could scarcely raise the amounts needed to pay for it. The tax was levied and eventually collected but there were many who resented what they saw as an unjustified tax and some, including the Longbowman, decided they would rebel and take action to redress matters. Thus it was that when the collected taxes (of great value and now exchanged into gold coins) were being transferred to the King’s treasury, the Longbowman (who had received information of this transfer) and his supporters prepared to capture the chest of gold coins for re-distribution back to those who it had been (in the eyes of many) taken from unfairly. Object: For Ambush in the Forest the object is also to “Hold the Key” (C3) and this wins the Battle (game). The Game is usually called just Ambush and can be described as a Convergence game. Settings: For Ambush in the Forest there is a Clearing in a Forest and the centre of the Clearing is the Key Position (C3), which is a chest of gold coins derived from taxes. The board can be called the “Forest Clearing board”. The Board & Characters: The Play: Of the two sets of Characters, who move alternately, Green moves first, and the Longbowman and the King’s Sheriff (who can be called simply the Sheriff) both move and capture as the King’s Lancer of TigerChess and so they can jump across or onto the C3 square (the Key position) whereas this position blocks (see Facet 3: Northern Light) the move of a sliding piece such as a Rook or Bishop of Western Chess. The Sword-hands and the Guardsmen both move and capture as the Queen’s Lancer of TigerChess and so they could (this does not happen) also jump across the C3 position. The Staffmen and Tax Collectors both move and capture as the Knight of Western Chess and so are not impeded by the C3 position. The object of the game is to “Hold the Key position” or simply to “Hold the Key” and this requires two objectives to be met: 1. A Character needs to have reached and occupied the Key Position which is the C3 position. 2. The Character must Hold the Key position for the next turn of his opponent. This means that his opponent must capture him immediately or lose the game. If he does capture him then he would then himself have reached and occupied the Key Position and would himself win the game unless he is then likewise immediately captured and this condition continues until no capture is made. If a Character has captured his last opposing Character but is not occupying the Key Position then he (or any fellow Characters) may carry on moving until the Key Position is occupied (if possible- if not possible then the game is a draw), otherwise Characters must move alternatively. Scores: For Ambush in the Forest the score is two Game Points for a win and one Game Point each for a draw – but only for the first time of a player’s playing; thereafter no Points, Chords or marks are awarded to the player when Ambush is played as a Stand-alone game; but the game can, as can Duel, of course be played without scoring and it should be noted that all Tiger’s-Eye Games etc. can be awarded “Merit-prizes” which are awarded for outstanding Games etc. whether or not they have been awarded T-Eye Points, Chords or any marks. Merit-prizes can sometimes be very valuable. Clocks: For Ambush in the Forest each player has thirty minutes on a single countdown clock. Each move is time-lagged by five seconds. Notes: 1. Draws include threefold repetition of moves/position and also draws by insufficient material. 2. Players may simply be called the Green Player or the Red Player. Jewel Facet 3: Northern Light- a Treasure Hunt. There are three distinct sections making up this game and their full names are: 1. Northern Light – a Treasure Hunt – 1st Hunt: DiamondQi 2. Northern Light – a Treasure Hunt – 2nd Hunt: DiamondQuest or Diamaranga 3. Northern Light – a Treasure Hunt – 3rd Hunt: DiamondChess The three sections are usually called DiamondQi, DiamondQuest and DiamondChess. Notes: Qi is pronounced as in the English word key. Each game section is dealt with in turn and DiamondQuest is only played if DiamondQi is a draw and DiamondChess is only played if DiamondQuest is a draw. Northern Light is the Tie-break game for The Dragon Trilogy. The same Player (TimeLord) plays the same Side (same colour Characters) for all three sections if they are played. Keys in Time 3 – A Jewel unearthed: The time of Northern Light is many centuries before The Dragon Trilogy. The Inhabitants of The Woodland Kingdom are at a crossroads and possibly in a crisis, for a Diamond Earthstone of great size and potency has been discovered in a remote northern part of the Kingdom. This stone has been named as “The Northern Light” and such stones are so rare as to be almost unknown and have attained near mythical status. The discovery of the stone has coincided with a time of a succession dispute within the Kingdom as the King, who has not named an heir, is very old and in failing health and there are two young Princesses who have succession claims to the Woodland throne and whoever succeeds with their claim will take possession of the Northern Light which in the meantime has been given over to the safekeeping of the Nobles of the Kingdom. After much debate it has been agreed that the succession dispute and possession of the Northern Light will be decided by means of one or more “Treasure Hunts” where the rules of the Hunts must be followed and it is forbidden to intentionally inflict injuries on opponents in the normal course of events. The Princesses and their supporters have been designated for the purposes of the Hunt(s) as Green (north) and Red (south) and are considerably different in temperament for whereas the Green Princess is fairly calm and careful in her actions, the Red Princess is (and is sometimes called) stormy and is impulsive and sometimes hasty in her actions. It is expected that the losing Princess will go into exile. DiamondQi: Object: For DiamondQi the Object is to “Win the Key” or “Win the Key position” (D4) which is the same as to “Hold the Key” but only a Princess can do so here whereas any Character can Hold the Key in Facet 2: Ambush for example. This wins the game. Settings: Northern Light (all three sections) takes place in (part of) the Woodland Kingdom (see Fortress of the Witch). The Key position (square) of D4 is the Northern Light itself (which also appears in Fortress of the Witch and Dragon). The board can be called the “Northern Light board” in all three sections. The Board & Characters: The Play: Of the two sets of Characters, who move alternately, who moves first is decided by the roll of a standard dice or coin. The Princesses move the same as the Western Chess Kings but the Princesses are not “Royal” as are the Kings of Western Chess and they are not vulnerable to Check or Checkmate and may occupy adjacent squares, but if they are captured then their side cannot win the game, but may still draw the game (see below). The Towers move like the Rooks of Western Chess, The Knights move like the Knights of Western Chess, the Nobles move like the Bishops of Western Chess and the Pikemen like the Pawns of Western Chess. All these pieces also capture in the same way as their Western Chess counterparts. The Pikemen can only move one square on their first move. The object of the game is to “Win the Key” or to “Win the Key position” and this requires two objectives to be met: 1. A Princess needs to have reached and occupied the Key position which is the D4 position and is the Diamond Earthstone known as the Northern Light. 2. The Princess must Hold the Key position for the immediate next turn of her opponent. This means that her opponent must capture her immediately or lose the game. If he does then capture her with a piece other than his own Princess he saves the game but does not win the game, but if he does then capture her with his own Princess then he will have won the game unless she is also then immediately captured. Notes: 1. If a Princess is captured the player does not lose the game and may still draw. 2. If both Princesses are captured then the game is a draw. 3. The D4 position acts as a block to pieces that slide - the Towers and Nobles. This means that such pieces cannot move past (directly over) the position, but they can move onto or capture onto the D4 position. Knights are unimpeded by the D4 position. 4. Occupying the Key Position with a piece other than a Princess has no special effect or significance. 5. Pikemen do not promote on their end rank but must stay on their end rank until and unless captured. 6. There is no castling type move. 7. Characters move alternatively (but see below). 8. If a side’s last Character has been captured then any opposing Character(s) may carry on moving until the Key Position is occupied by and won by their Princess (if possible, or the game is a draw) - otherwise Characters must move alternatively. 9. DiamondQi (but not DiamondQuest or DiamondChess) can be described as a Convergence game. 10. Draws include threefold repetition of moves/position and also insufficient material. Scores: For DiamondQi the score is one Game Point for a win and half a Game Point for each player for a draw. If DiamondQi has ended in a draw then the game moves to the 2nd Hunt of Northern Light which is DiamondQuest – If DiamondQi has ended in a win then the game of Northern Light has ended and the score is 1-0 to the winning Player: Clocks: For DiamondQi each player has sixty minutes on a single countdown clock. Note: If the game moves to DiamondQuest then a short interval is allowable of up to thirty minutes. DiamondQuest (aka Diamaranga): Object: For DiamondQuest the Object is to Encircle (Checkmate) the opposing Princess. This wins the Hunt (game). Princesses are now “Royal” and so are vulnerable to Check and Checkmate and therefore may not occupy adjacent squares. Settings: Northern Light (all three sections) takes place in (part of) the Woodland Kingdom. The Northern Light, having failed to be won, has been moved to safety by two Watchers, one from each side, and who now wins this prize will perhaps be determined by playing the 2nd Hunt of Northern light known as DiamondQuest. The Board & Characters: Notes: 1. The D4 position is now the same as any other and the board is now a straightforward 7x7 non-chequered Chessboard. 2. Ornamental Watchers and the Northern Light can be placed alongside the board. The Play: Of the two sets of Characters, who move alternately, who moves first is the opposite of who moved first in DiamondQi. The Princesses move the same as the Western Chess Kings and this time the Princesses are “Royal” as are the Kings of Western Chess and as already stated they are vulnerable to Check or Checkmate. The Towers move like the Rooks of Western Chess, The Knights move like the Knights of Western Chess, the Nobles move like the Bishops of Western Chess and the Pikemen like the Pawns of Western Chess. All these pieces also capture in the same way as their Western Chess counterparts. The Pikemen can only move one square on their first move. As already stated the object of the game is to Encircle (Checkmate) the opposing Princess. Notes: 1. Pikemen can and must promote on their end rank to either an Aristocrat (same powers as a Tower), a Noble or a Knight. 2. There is castling and this is called Towering and the normal rules of Western Chess castling apply – The Princess moves two squares laterally and the Tower moves two squares laterally the opposite way to stand next to her. 3. Characters move alternatively. 4. Draws include threefold repetition of moves/position and Stalemate. 5. DiamondQuest is also known as Diamaranga. Scores: For DiamondQuest the score is one Game Point for a win but there are no Points awarded for a draw. If DiamondQuest has ended in a draw then the game moves to the 3rd Hunt of Northern Light which is DiamondChess – If DiamondQuest has ended in a win then the game of Northern Light has ended and the score is 1 ½ - ½ to the winning Player as both Players keep their half point from DiamondQi. Clocks: For DiamondQuest each player has thirty minutes on a single countdown clock plus any unused time on his clock from DiamondQi. Unlike DiamondQi, DiamondQuest has a five second time-lagging for each move. DiamondChess: Object: For DiamondChess the Object is to Encircle (Checkmate) the opposing Princess. This wins the Hunt (game). Princesses are “Royal” as in DiamondQuest. Settings: Northern Light (all three sections) takes place in (part of) the Woodland Kingdom. The Northern Light, having failed to be won on either the first or second Hunt, remains in safety by the two Watchers, and who now wins this prize will perhaps be determined by playing the 3rd Hunt of Northern light known as DiamondChess. The Board & Characters: Notes: 1. The board is the same 7x7 Chessboard used for DiamondQuest. 2. Ornamental Watchers and the Northern Light can be placed alongside the board. The Play: Of the two sets of Characters, who move alternately, who moves first is decided by the roll of a standard dice or coin. All the rules of play are identical to DiamondQuest except that the Pikemen also have an optional initial two square (position) move the same as does the Pawn of Western Chess or the Pikeman of TigerChess etc. The en-passant capture rules now apply. As already stated the object of the game is to Encircle (Checkmate) the opposing Princess. Scores: For DiamondChess the score is one Game Point for a win but there are no Points awarded for a draw. If DiamondChess has ended in a win then the game of Northern Light has ended and the score is 1 ½ - ½ Game Points to the winning Player as both Players keep their half point from DiamondQi. If DiamondChess has ended in a draw then the game of Northern Light has ended in a draw and the score is ½ - ½ as only the half Game Point for DiamondQi will be awarded to the Players. If the game ends in a win then the winning Princess will gain her prize of the Northern Light and will succeed in her claim to the throne. If the game ends in a draw then the Northern Light will remain under the safe-keeping of the two Watchers and Nobles until such time as the succession dispute is resolved or possibly another Hunt is arranged. Draws include threefold repetition of moves/position and Stalemate. Clocks: For DiamondChess each player has thirty minutes on a single countdown clock plus any unused time on his clock from DiamondQuest. DiamondChess has a five second time-lagging for each move. Note: In order to distinguish between the Pikemen of each of the three Hunts they are described as follows: 1. 1st Hunt Pikemen are described as (initiate) Pikemen. 2. 2nd Hunt Pikemen are described as (trainee) Pikemen. 3. 3rd Hunt Pikemen are described as (inducted) Pikemen. When played as the Tie-break game for The Dragon Trilogy: Northern Light is the Tie-break game for The Dragon Trilogy. When played as this Tie-break game the points scored for the individual game(s) are as above but are Nominal Points. The winner of the game(s) scores the usual four Game Points as the overall win bonus for The Dragon Trilogy except if “The Deciding Hunt” is played (see below). The following apply: 1. The Players are called the Green TimeLord who plays the Green Characters and the Red TimeLord who plays the Red Characters. 2. The Players keep the same Sides/Characters if DiamondQuest and DiamondChess are played. 3. As with the stand-alone game, DiamondQuest and DiamondChess are only played if draws occur. 4. Who moves first for each game is as described above in the stand-alone game. 5. Choice of sides is decided by roll of standard dice or coin. However, either Player (whether an Individual or a member of a Team) may insist that he plays the same North or South Side that he or his Team played in Dragon and Stones of Fortune, e.g. The Forest OverLord/Light Stone Master would then be (if an Individual) The Green TimeLord playing The Green Characters. This rule would also apply were there a connected game of Fortress of the Witch. 6. Clock times and interval time are the same as stated above for the stand-alone game(s). 7. If a win occurs in any of the three games then the winning player is awarded the win bonus of four Game Points. 8. If there are draws in all the three games then a second game of DiamondChess is played with the Players keeping the same Sides and the same Player who moved first in the first game of DiamondChess also moves first in the second such game and also the time controls are the same as the first such game with any unused time added on from the first game of DiamondChess. The winner (if one) of this game wins the Trilogy and is awarded an extra one Nominal Point but is only awarded a win bonus of three Game Points however, and if this game ends in a draw then the Player who moved second is awarded an extra half a Nominal Point and wins the Trilogy but is only awarded one Game Point as a win bonus. This game is called “The Deciding Hunt”. 9. The winning Princess will gain her prize of the Northern Light and will succeed in her claim to the throne. Jewel: General Notes to Facets 1 to 3 1. There can be suitable video/visual/audio effects to the games. 2. All the participating Characters and background Characters of the games are of the male gender except for females as follows: a) The Princess and the Witch in Duel. b) The Princesses in Northern Light. c) The Watchers in Northern Light. The Towers in Northern Light are constructions. 3. If required there are the following abbreviations for the Characters of Jewel: The Prince in Duel: JLD -GNPR The Armed Guard in Duel: JLD-RDAR The Longbowman in Ambush: JLA-GNLO A Sword-hand in Ambush: JLA-GNSW A Staffman in Ambush: JLA-GNST The King’s Sheriff in Ambush: JLA-RDKI A Guardsman in Ambush: JLA-RDGU A Tax Collector in Ambush: JLA-RDTA The Green Princess in Northern Light: JLN-GNPS A Green Noble in Northern Light: JLN-GNNO A Green Knight in Northern Light: JLN-GNKN A Green Tower in Northern Light: JLN-GNTO A Green Aristocrat in Northern Light: JLN-GNAR A Green (initiate) Pikeman in Northern Light: JLN-GNIN A Green (trainee) Pikeman in Northern Light: JLN-GNTN A Green (inducted) Pikeman in Northern Light: JLN-GNID The Red Princess in Northern Light: JLN-RDPS A Red Noble in Northern Light: JLN-RDNO A Red Knight in Northern Light: JLN-RDKN A Red Tower in Northern Light: JLN-RDTO A Red Aristocrat in Northern Light: JLN-RDAR A Red (initiate) Pikeman in Northern Light: JLN-RDIN A Red (trainee) Pikeman in Northern Light: JLN-RDTN A Red (inducted) Pikeman in Northern Light: JLN-RDID

Setup

Jewel – further Facets: Facets 1, 2 and 3 of Jewel have all had Key Positions as the centre of the object of winning the games. There are two further variations on this theme considered here which bring the number of Facets to 5 and a conclusion to Jewel: 1. “Securing the Key” or “Securing the Key position” is the same as Holding the Key inasmuch as a piece (any piece) must first occupy the Key Position but whereas in Holding the Key the opponent must then immediately capture the occupying piece or lose the game, here the opponent need only to attack (or he can capture on) the Key Position (square) with one (or more) of his pieces to save the game but he needs to maintain (on his turn) an attack on the Key Position as long as there is an opposing piece occupying the Position or he loses the game. 2.“Capturing the Key” or “Capturing the Key Position” is the same as Securing the Key above but in this case only one (or perhaps more) specified piece must occupy the Key Position (square) in order to win the game instead of any piece as in Securing the Key – the other rules regarding attacking the Key position are otherwise the same as above in Securing the Key. Notes: 1. A game – Facet 4: Crystal of Doom, utilising Securing the Key follows. 2. A game – Facet 5: Star-Lords, utilising Capturing the Key follows. 3. These two games would also for the most part be called Convergence games. Jewel Facet 4: Crystal of Doom Crystal of Doom is the fourth game in the Jewel Series and has the winning object as Securing the Key. The game can be described as a complex convergence game. The Players and Sides: The Green TimeLord who plays The Green Characters and The Red TimeLord who plays The Red Characters The Settings: For Crystal of Doom there is Foliage which surrounds a Crypt at the centre of which there is The Crystal of Doom. The above are situated in The Cloaked Kingdom.   The Board & Characters: Notes on Board: 1. The difference in the boards is cosmetic only. 2. The Board can be two sided with the Plain settings on one side and the Patterned settings on the other. 3. The Board (Key-board 4) is called the “Crystal board” (Plain or Patterned). 4. The E5 Position is the “Key Position” and is the Crystal itself. There can be an ornamental object situated on this position. Overview: The time is shortly after Stones of Fortune Keys in Time 4 – Tales from the Crypt: One of the effects of The Great Rift is to give visibility and awareness to that which previously was indistinct or hard to see. Amongst that which has now become much more visible and clear is the Kingdom known as The Cloaked Kingdom and The Crystal of Doom within this Kingdom. The Crystal of Doom lies at the centre of a crypt and although the crypt has nobody in it there are many writings about previous adventures concerning the Cloaked Kingdom. Amongst the writings is the story of the time long ago when a tyrant magician ruled over the Cloaked Kingdom and this tyrant, in order to make himself invulnerable, placed his heart at the top of a seemingly impregnable tower and so the magician believed he could not be harmed and would rule forever. Eventually however a sailor from far off arrived who scaled the tower and there faced the magician and defeated him and so ended his rule. Also written about is an even earlier time when a band of sailors from a far off land arrived in the Cloaked Kingdom having defeated many monsters including a bronze giant and a many-headed creature and in so doing these sailors won one of the greatest prizes of the Kingdom and took it back to their homeland. The discovery of the Crystal of Doom has polarised those of the Cloaked Kingdom. Those of the Green Characters believe that this legendary gemstone will always bring harm and disaster upon those using it. Those of the Red Characters believe that with understanding the Crystal can be used to beneficial effect. Both sides now seek to secure possession of this gemstone. The Green Characters will, if they secure possession, take the gemstone to the Emerald Kingdom (see TigerChess) who have the means to crush it and so destroy it. The Red Characters will, if they secure possession, seek to use it. Both sides have arrived at the Crypt and will now battle to secure possession of the Crystal. Object: The object of the Game is to “Secure the Key” or “Secure the Key Position” as has already been described. This wins the Battle (Game).   Moves & capturing powers of the Characters: A Cloaked Prince: He has the combined moving and capturing powers of the standard Western Chess Knight plus the Queen’s Lancer of TigerChess. An Adjacent: He has the moving and capturing powers of a non-royal Western Chess King. He does not have to evade check or anything suchlike. An Attacker: He has the moving and capturing powers of the standard Western Chess Bishop. A Leaper: He has the moving and capturing powers of the standard Western Chess Knight. A Roller: He has the moving and capturing powers of the standard Western Chess Rook. An Advancer: He has the moving and capturing powers of the standard Western Chess Pawn including the initial optional two square move and so the en passant rules apply. Upon reaching their end rank however, Advancers do not promote but must stay where they are until and unless captured. Note: The E5 position acts as a block to pieces that slide – the Attackers and Rollers. This means that such pieces cannot move past (directly over) the position, but they can move onto or capture onto the E5 position. Cloaked Princes and Leapers are unimpeded by the E5 position.   General rules & notes: 1. The game can also be called simply Crystal. 2. Scores are 4-0 Chords for a win and 2-2 Chords for each Player for a draw. These scores are both for when the game is played as a stand-alone game or as part of the Jewel Series. 3. Draws include threefold repetition of moves/position. Also lack of material. 4. Clocks are TigerClocks – double countdown, and standard times are 120 minutes engagement time for each Player and reserve time is 60 seconds per engagement time move for each Player. 5. There can be suitable video/visual/audio effects to the game. 6. Players move alternatively. However if a Character has captured his last opposing Character but is not occupying the Key Position then he (or any fellow Characters) may carry on moving until the Key Position is occupied. (if possible, if not possible then the game is a draw). 7. For a stand-alone game 1st move is decided by roll of dice or coin. 8. If required there are the following abbreviations: The Green Cloaked Prince: JLC-GCP A Green Adjacent: JLC-GAJ A Green Attacker: JLC-GAK A Green Leaper: JLC-GLP A Green Roller: JLC-GRL A Green Advancer: JLC-GAV The Red Cloaked Prince: JLC-RCP A Red Adjacent: JLC-RAJ A Red Attacker: JLC-RAK A Red Leaper: JLC-RLP A Red Roller: JLC-RRL A Red Advancer: JLC-RAV   Jewel Facet 5: Star-Lords Star-Lords is the fifth and last game in the Jewel Series and has the winning object as Capturing the Key. The game can be described as a complex convergence game. The Players and Sides: The Green TimeLord who plays The Green Characters or Green Expedition and The Red TimeLord who plays The Red Characters or Red Expedition The Settings: For Star-Lords there is Jungle which surrounds Caverns at the centre of which there is The Treasure of the World which is sometimes called The Lost Treasure. The above are situated in The Lost World. The Board & Characters: Notes: 1. The Board (Key-board 5) is called the “Treasure board”. 2. The F6 Position is the “Key Position” and is the Treasure itself. There can be ornamental objects situated on this position. Overview: The time is a few years after Crystal of Doom Keys in Time 5 – The Treasure of the World: The Treasure of the World has been more myth than reality since centuries before The Great Change. The Great Rift has however finally led to the discovery of this treasure which in monetary value exceeds all other treasures of New-Earth combined. Despite attempts to keep the discovery secret news has slowly spread and two rival expeditions from overseas have arrived at the site of the treasure and now confront each other ready to battle for possession of the treasure. The two expeditions have different plans for the use of the treasure should they take possession and it is this that has brought them into conflict. The Green expedition will use the treasure to fund a public trust for education and welfare etc. purposes whereas the Red expedition will use the treasure for private business purposes. There are amongst the treasure a few items of power (such as the Golden Axe – see TigerQuest in Chess from Draughts etc.) but these are seen by the Green expedition as dangerous and they will destroy them or put them beyond use; the Red expedition however, may seek to risk their use. Object: The object of the Game is to “Capture the Key” or “Capture the Key Position” as has already been described. This wins the Battle (Game). The Key Position (F6) must be occupied by an Expedition Leader in order to win. Moves & capturing powers of the Characters: An Expedition Leader: He has the moving and capturing powers of a non-royal Western Chess King. He does not have to evade check or anything suchlike. An Expedition Captain: He has the moving and capturing powers of the standard Western Chess Rook. An Expedition Navigator: He has the moving and capturing powers of the standard Western Chess Bishop. An Expedition Escort (armed): He has the moving and capturing powers of the standard Western Chess Knight. An Expedition Orderly: He has the moving and capturing powers of the standard Western Chess Pawn but not the initial optional two square move and so the en passant rules do not apply. Upon reaching their end rank (11th rank) however, Orderlies do not promote but must stay where they are until and unless captured. Note: The F6 position acts as a block to pieces that slide – the Captains and Navigators. This means that such pieces cannot move past (directly over) the position, but they can move onto or capture onto the F6 position. Escorts are unimpeded by the F6 position. General rules & notes: 1. The game can also be called simply Treasure. 2. Occupying the Key Position with a piece other than a Leader has no special effect or significance. 3. Scores are 5-0 Chords for a win and 2-2 Chords for each Player for a draw. These scores are both for when the game is played as a stand-alone game or as part of the Jewel Series. 4. Draws include threefold repetition of moves/position. Also lack of material is a draw. Where a side has both Leaders captured then a win is not possible for that side though a draw may be. If all Leaders are captured then the game is a draw. 5. Clocks are TigerClocks – double countdown, and standard times are 120 minutes engagement time for each Player and reserve time is 60 seconds per engagement time move for each Player. 6. There can be suitable video/visual/audio effects to the game. 7. For a stand-alone game 1st move is decided by roll of dice or coin. 8. Characters move alternatively (but see below). 9. If a side’s last Character has been captured then any opposing Character(s) may carry on moving until the Key Position is occupied by and won by one of their Leaders (if possible, or the game is a draw) - otherwise Characters must move alternatively. 10. If required there are the following abbreviations: A Green Expedition Leader: GexpL A Green Expedition Captain: GexpC A Green Expedition Navigator: GexpN A Green Expedition Escort (armed): GexpE A Green Expedition Orderly: GexpO A Red Expedition Leader: RexpL A Red Expedition Captain: RexpC A Red Expedition Navigator: RexpN A Red Expedition Escort (armed): RexpE A Red Expedition Orderly: RexpO   Jewel as a Linked-series: Jewel (or Keys in Time) is played primarily as a Linked-series of games called “The Jewel Series”. The series is scored by what are called “Tiger’s-eye Chords”. Chords have an officially exchangeable value with Tiger’s-eye Game Points but their value can vary though one T-eye Chord is not permitted to exceed 80% of one Tiger’s-eye Game Point or to fall below 20% of one T-eye Game Point. The Games must be played in the order shown below and the Chords scored for each Game are also shown below. In addition are shown the Alternate bonuses for winning each game and more is explained about this further on below: Jewel Series Tie-breaking: If the Jewel Series ends with both players scoring the same number of Chords and so is a draw then the following applies: The Tie-break Game is called Race (there are also entertainment only variations). Overview: The time is immediately after Star-Lords (If) The millennia-long Jewel Series has ended level and the Leaders of the Green and Red Expeditions in Star-Lords have challenged each other and agreed that the Series will be decided by a race between the Leaders around the Caverns surrounding the Treasure of The World. The winning TimeLord will then win the Jewel Series. The Players and Sides: The Players are as for all the Jewel Series i.e. The Green TimeLord and The Red TimeLord. Each TimeLord plays their same colour Expedition Leaders. The Sides each consist of the two Expedition Leaders from Star-Lords. The game can (but usually is not, as it is assumed) be described as Two-handed Race. The Settings and Board: The Settings and Board are as for Star-Lords. There is also a standard six sided dice and a cup for rolling it. Initial deployment is that the two Green Expedition Leaders are placed on square K11 and the two Red Expedition Leaders are placed on square A1. There can be a number of video, visual or audio effects to Race. The entertainment only variations in some instances can have very spectacular effects. These variations (often suited to Role-playing) are described later in TigerPad and are listed below: • Four-handed Race. Usually played on a board – popular in the RiverField Kingdom. • Lightning x2 (x2 indicates the number of players & the game can also be called Two-handed). Usually played on a board. • Lightning x4. Usually played on a board but sometimes in a Life-size environment. • Laser (or Lasers) x2. Usually played in a Life-size environment. • Laser (or Lasers) x4. Usually played in a Life-size environment – popular in New-Camelot. Note: There are no gender designations for any personnel partaking in any of the Race variations listed above. Object: The object of the game of Race and all its variations is to move (clockwise) round the perimeter of the board with both Expedition Leaders and for them both to return back to their starting (deployment) square before both of the opposing Expedition Leaders do so. This wins the race (game). The Play, Moves & Setting-back powers of the Expedition Leaders: A player on his turn must first roll the dice and move round the perimeter of the board according to the uppermost number shown on the dice. The actual move is a clockwise advance of squares by either of the player’s Expedition Leaders by the number shown on the uppermost side of the dice, or by the Expedition Leader not having returned to his starting square if one has already returned there. Both a player’s Expedition Leaders can occupy the same square and whilst so cannot be Set-back - see below. If, after having moved, a forwards (taken as - from A1 northwards, from All eastwards, from K11 southwards, from K1 westwards) then clockwise diagonal from the square an Expedition Leader has landed on reaches across to another side of the board to an opposing single Expedition Leader then the opposing Expedition Leader must return (be Set-back) to his starting square and he must begin his journey round the board’s perimeter again; this Set-back does not apply if both opposing Expedition Leaders occupy the relevant square that is reached across to. The F6 position (F6 is usually called a position not a square) however acts as a block to a diagonal. For example if an Expedition Leader lands on A10 then an opposing Expedition Leader on B11 would be Set-back to his starting square; if an Expedition Leader lands on A11 then the F6 position blocks and prevents any Set-back on K1; if an Expedition Leader lands on B11 then an opposing Expedition Leader on K2 would be Set-back; if an Expedition Leader lands on G9 then an opposing Expedition Leader on I7 is Set-back and so on provided only one Expedition Leader occupies the relevant square – this is called Diagonal Setting-back. Also a Set-back occurs, called Forward Setting-back, when an Expedition leader lands on a square occupied by a single opposing Expedition Leader and this Expedition Leader is then Set-back; if however both a player’s Expedition leaders occupy a square then neither can be Set-back and the opposing Expedition Leader cannot land on this square and must make another move, if possible, or pass the move. It can be seen that what is called a Double Setting-back can occur by a Forward Setting-back occurring that also simultaneously gives rise to a Diagonal Setting-back. It is not compulsory to play a move to make a Set-back or the greatest number of Set-backs unless there is no other move available. Note: A Leader who is singly on a square is called an Unsecured Leader whilst two Leaders on a square are called Secured Leaders. Note: Setting-back occurs as and when the attacking Leader lands on the relevant square. For an Expedition leader to reach their starting square having moved round the board’s perimeter it is not necessary to throw the exact number on the dice to land on the square but the minimum to reach the square or more must be thrown. The finishing Expedition Leader is then placed off the board next to this square. General Rules for Race 1. Squares are usually called squares and not positions as in some games. This also applies to all the Jewel Series games except for the Key positions. 2. The game of Race can also be played as a Stand-alone game. 3. Players move alternately. 4. For Tie-breaking who moves first is the reverse of who moved first in Star-Lords. For a Stand-alone game first move is decided by roll of dice or coin. 5. Clocks are TigerSwing clocks – double time control with a Reserve balance of 30 minutes and a Swing Balance of 30 seconds. The move limit is 50 moves for each side and there is time lagging of 10 seconds per move except for Laser where time lagging must suit the circunstances. Basic TigerSwing Clocks are explained in Stones of Fortune - also see “Clocks” in TigerPad. Passed moves are counted for move limits. 6. Movement round the board is in a clockwise direction for all Expedition Leaders. 7. After the move limit is reached the game continues however, but there is no more Setting-back at all and no restrictions whatsoever on any Expedition Leader(s) of one or of both sides occupying the same square; also the player who started the game moving second and will have just moved now has the move again, after which players move alternately. The game’s object is still the same i.e. the winner is still the player who has moved both his Expedition Leaders back to their commencing square before his opponent does so. It should be noted that the board’s 40 square perimeter does not include squares such as B3 or H9 etc. The game can be described after finishing as: Race – completed by 50 or Race - completed after 50. These rules apply to all Race variations and where the variation is Four-handed after the move limit is reached the player with the move will be the player who moved last to start the game. Scoring: 8. For a Stand-alone game the winning player scores one Chord. 9. For the Tie-break game for the Jewel Series the winning player scores one Note (a type of Mark) and wins the Series and is awarded the Win Bonus of five Chords (but not if he has opted for the Alternate bonuses – see Further Notes on The Jewel Series). Setting-back on Prominent squares: 10. If an Expedition Leader lands on for example B4, then he can Diagonally set-back on what are called a set of Prominent squares that in this example are F8, G9, H10 & I11 and F8 is also called a Foremost square. Note that B4 is itself part of the set of Prominent squares consisting of A3, B4, C5, & D6 (also a Foremost square). The Leader landing on B4 can Diagonally Set-back an opposing Unsecured Leader on any of the Prominent squares F8, G9, H10 or I11, but if there are two (or possibly more in Four-handed) opposing Unsecured Leaders on this set of Prominent squares then only the Relatively foremost Leader can be Set-back. Relatively foremost means the nearer/nearest Leader to the attacking Leader along what are called the Diagonal attack squares and in this example a Leader on F8 would be the nearest possible. Note that a further move by the Leader on B4 that stays on the same set of Prominent squares (here C5 or D6) gives another opportunity to possibly Diagonally Set-back again on F8, G9, H10 or I11. Blocking of Setting-back on Prominent squares: 11. As already stated the F6 position acts as a block to any Diagonal Setting-back that would run through F6. Blocks to Diagonal Setting-back can also occur temporarily with regard to Prominent squares and if we use the example above of a Leader landing on the B4 position then he can only Diagonally Set-back on F8, G9, H10 or I11 if all the diagonal squares in between are completely unoccupied e.g. if there is an opposing Unsecured Leader on G9 then C5, D6 and F8 (E7 does not form part of the board’s perimeter) must not have any Leaders on at all (opposing or fellow) if he is to be Set-back though if F8 is also occupied by an opposing Unsecured Leader then this Leader could be Set-back in this instance – any Leader(s) of either side on C5 or D6 would block and prevent Setting-back to the Prominent squares of F8, G9 etc. Note that the Leader on B4 could not Diagonally Set-back on C5 or D6 as an opposing Unsecured Leader on either of these squares would need to be Forwardly Set-back.   Further Notes on The Jewel Series: 1. Game names on the Keys in Time Table are the preferred names when these games are played as The Jewel Series. 2. The specified piece advantage as the Alternate bonus for winning Northern light means that the opposing player in Crystal of Doom starts the game an Adjacent down. The choice of which Adjacent is made by the Player who is the Adjacent down. 3. The details of the (once during the game)Take back of one move as the Alternate bonus (for winning Crystal of Doom) during Star-Lords means that the Player with the bonus may, before completing a move, take back his previous move and his opponents last move and replay his previous move. Clocks are not altered however. 4. To become The Sky-Prince a Player must first opt for the Alternate bonuses (see below) and then win the Game of Star-Lords and also win the series overall (see below). 5. As with other Sets (see Games by Groupings) there is an overall win reward of an additional five Tiger’s-eye Chords. This overall reward is also called the overall win bonus or just win bonus. This win bonus is awarded to the overall winner of the series if he has not opted for Alternate bonuses (see below). 6. Situations can arise where neither player wins a bonus. 7. The overall winner of the series is determined by total Chords scored for and total Chords scored against. 8. Instead of the possible win bonus of five Chords, a Player may opt to be awarded the Alternate bonuses for winning Games and the bonuses for each of these Games is shown above. 9. Each Player must state what bonus(es) he opts for before commencing the series. It is not allowed to partially mix bonuses. .   Order of Play for The Jewel Series: 1. Duel in the Castle 2. Ambush in the Forest 3. a) Northern Light 1st Hunt – DiamondQi. b) Northern Light 2nd Hunt – DiamondQuest (aka Diamaranga). Only played if required (see Notes). c)Northern Light 3rd Hunt – DiamondChess. Only played if required (see Notes). 4. Crystal of Doom. 5. Star-Lords: 6. Race, for Tie-breaking, if required (see Notes). Notes: 1. Northern light 2nd Hunt is only played if the 1st Hunt is a draw. 2. Northern Light 3rd Hunt is only played if the 2nd Hunt is a draw. 3. Race is only played if The Jewel Series overall is a draw.   Other: Like The TigerGuard (see TigerSquares) and The Emerald Lord (see TigerChess), The Sky-Prince wins moving and capturing powers which are, were he to appear on a board in the future, the movement powers of the Elder Winged Serpent but only the capturing powers of the Younger Winged Serpent (see Dragon). These are somewhat similar to those of the Storm Dragon before her being injured (also see Dragon) which were the movement powers of the Elder Winged Serpent but the capturing powers of the Ice Dragon. If there is a team(s) playing Jewel then any Sky-Prince is the player who played and won the game of Star-Lords. Playing The Jewel Series is (Generally) the only time with Tiger’s-eye Games that scores of official value may be awarded for play against a computer (which must be suitably programmed and should have a good number of suitable and varied visual and audio effects),. The playing strength of the computer must be set as somewhat stronger than the usual playing strength of the person playing (if possible, or the series is not likely to be authorised). These types of series must be officially authorised. Computers may be used for any Tiger’s-eye Game where (generally) no scores of official value are awarded including The Jewel Series. It is not of course necessary to play The Jewel Series against a computer. The Players are called The Green TimeLord who plays the North sides throughout the series and The Red TimeLord who plays the South sides throughout the series. The Jewel Series can simply be called Jewel or can be called Keys in Time or simply Keys. Players may be individuals or Teams of up to three individuals. It should be noted that throughout Tiger's-Eye Games teams mean different people of a group of people playing the different games and not several people consulting during an individual game. Crystal of Doom and Star-Lords can be played as Stand-alone games and then their scores are the same as when played in The Jewel Series i.e. four T-eye Chords for winning Crystal of Doom and five T-eye Chords for winning Star-Lords. The overall win bonus and Alternate bonuses no longer apply and are not awarded of course. When playing Crystal of Doom either player can insist on using the Patterned settings board, otherwise the Plain settings board is used. When played in Tiger’s-eye Opera (see same named page) the Patterned settings board must be used. Star-Lords can also be called “The Treasure of the World” or “The Lost Treasure” as well as simply “Treasure”.


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By Glenn Nicholls.
Web page created: 2015-07-07. Web page last updated: 2015-07-07