The Chess Variant Pages
Custom Search





Pentaplane V

(c) 1997 George Marino

Introduction

George Marino, creator of Pentaplane and Timeline sent me this description of his game, Pentaplane, on September 8, 1997. It should be noted that Pentaplane is mentioned in David Pritchard's Encyclopedia of Chess Variants. --DH The Encyclopedia of Chess Variants mentions that Pentaplane is a proprietary game of Horizon games, invented by George Marino in 1986. --HB

Assembly

Notice that the shelves are of two types - ones with dotted corner squares and ones with plain corner squares. The shelves should alternate so that the top, middle, and bottom have dotted corner squares.

Movement

Rook Direction
There are six rook directions - forward, backward, left, right, straight up, and straight down. A rook cannot move diagonally. In figure 1, Rook R can get to any of the Xed squares by a one space rook move.
Bishop Direction
Bishops in chess move diagonally Each bishop remains on squares of the same color throughout the game. In PENTAPLANE, there are squares of two different "colors." Half the squares are dotted and half the squares are plane. Bishops move so that they remain on squares of the same "color." Thus, a bishop can move to any diagonally adjacent square in the same plane, or can move up and down diagonally as a department store escalator - just as long as it remains on squares of the same color. In figure 2, Bishop B can get to any of the Xed squares by a one space bishop move.
Cube Diagonal Direction
This is the direction from one cube to another when the cubes only touch at one point. A piece ( C in figure 3 ) moving one space in this direction will move to a different colored square. Cubers, promoted pawns (true queens) and kings can move in this direction.

The Pieces

King
The king can move one square in any of the three directions described above.
Rook
In one turn, the rook can move any number of squares in one of the rook directions. The squares through which it moves must be vacant. If the rook ends its move on a square occupied by an enemy piece, the enemy piece is captured.
Missile Rook (or Fortress)
In one turn, a missile rook can move or fire a missile but not both. If it moves it is restricted to one square per turn. If it move into a square occupied by an enemy piece, the enemy piece is captured. If a missile-rook fires a missile instead of moving, the missile continues to move in the direction it was fired until it hits something. The piece hit by the missile is captured. If the missile hits a bomb, friendly or enemy, the bomb explodes. You may fire a missile to detonate one of your own bombs. A missile rook can only fire a missile in the rook direction.
Bishop
In one turn, the bishop may move any number of squares in one of the bishop directions. The squares through which it moves must be vacant. If the bishop ends its move on a square occupied by an enemy piece, the enemy piece is captured.
Missile-Bishop (or Citadel)
Same as the missile-rook, except that it moves and fires in the bishop direction.
Cuber
In one turn, the cuber may move any number of squares in one of the cuber directions. The squares through which it moves must be vacant. If the cuber ends its move on a square occupied by an enemy piece, the enemy piece is captured.
Missile-Cuber (or Satellite)
Same as other missile pieces, except that it moves and fires in the cuber direction.
Knight
In one turn a knight moves two squares in any rook direction followed by a one square rook move in a direction perpendicular to the first part of its move. Two possible knight moves are pictured in figure 4A. In figure 4, knight N may move to any of the Xed squares regardless of any pieces in-between. Only the final square of a knight move needs to be empty or occupied by an enemy piece, in which case the enemy piece is captured.

Bomb
A bomb moves only one square per turn in the rook direction. But when it captures an enemy piece, or is captured by an enemy piece, or is struck by a missile, the bomb explodes, and all pieces - friendly and enemy alike - that occupy the 3 X 3 X 3 cube surrounding the bomb are all removed from the board. The bomb destroys itself and ignites any other bomb in the area. In figure 5, Bomb A destroys all pieces in the Xed squares, itself included.
Pawn
A pawn can move exactly one square in any rook direction (including sideways and backwards.) A pawn can capture by moving exactly one square in any bishop direction (including slant sideways and slant backwards). A pawn cannot move in the bishop direction except when capturing. The pawn cannot move in the rook direction when capturing. When a pawn reaches any square of the starting row of enemy pieces (the K or Xs in figure 6 - not the pawns) it promotes. The pawn promotes into a True Queen.
True Queen
A true queen can move in any of the three directions a king can move, but can move as many spaces in that direction as she wants.
Kamikaze-Queen
The kamikaze queen can move or capture as a rook or bishop. When it captures a piece, however, it destroys itself as well.

Object Of The Game

Capture (shoot or explode) the opponent's king.

Starting the Game

Each player sets up his king and pawns as in figure 6. Other pieces will be added to the Xed squares later.

Next: Player A selects any two (the same or different) pieces (except a pawn , promoted pawn, or another king) for himself and also gives copies of these two pieces to player B. Next player B selects two pieces and gives player A copies of these pieces. Now player A places his pieces (now four in number) on his starting squares (The Xed squares in figure 6.) Player B now places his pieces either the same way - or mirror image - in his starting squares. Player A makes the first move and the game begins.

Notes

Original player designed pieces may be added to the list of pieces to choose from. The game is intended to evolve and grow.

And: A computer version of Pentaplane will soon be available. Write to Geo Games for details.

Finally: Now that you have conquered the third dimension, conquer the fourth dimension. Geo Game's TIMELINE is a four-dimensional strategy game in which time-traveling chess pieces alter the present by changing the past. You can uncapture a piece. TIMELINE is available from:

                 GEO GAMES 
                 24 Tupelo
                 Naperville, IL 60540

The price of Timeline is $20 including shipping and handling.


Written by George Marino. Edited by David Howe.
WWW page created: September 15, 1997.