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  • Hasami Shogi

    I think that this is the most famous shogi variant in Japan. Even those who don't know how to play shogi knows the rule of this variant, because the rules are simple. I don't know when and by whom it was invented. The word "Hasami" means "sandwiching".

    Rules

    We use a usual shogi board (i.e., an uncheckered board of size 9 by 9) and 18 pawns. White puts his 9 pawns on each of the 1st rank squares, and black puts his 9 pawns on each of the 9th rank squares. Black puts his pawns reversively for easily distinguishing white and black pieces, although the white and black pawns have same power. Usually the promoted pawns are printed in red characters, making distinction easy. The opening setup is as follows.

    White:
    Pawns a1, b1, c1, d1, e1, f1, g1, h1, i1.

    Black:
    Promoted Pawns a9, b9, c9, d9, e9, f9, g9, h9, i9.

    Movement of pieces

    All the pieces move as the same way as a rook. No rule of "nifu" applies like in normal shogi. (The "nifu" rule is that you can not put two unpromoted pawns at the same column.)

    Capturing

    You capture differently from normal shogi in this variant. When you sandwiches opponent's piece(s) by two of your own pieces, you can take the sandwitched piece(s). It is similar to Othello. In Othello, you reverse the sandwiched opponent's pieces, but you capture the pieces instead of reversing them in this variant. Note that in Hasami Shogi, you can sandwich horizontally and vertically, but NOT diagonally. This is different from Othello's sandwich. You can capture any number of the sandwiched pieces; from 1 to 7. When you move your piece such that your pieces are sandwiched by the opponent pieces, your sandwiched pieces are not taken away from the board.

    Winning

    When the opponent has only one piece, you win.

    Variants

    Hint

    Put your pieces straight along a diagonal line.

    Hasami Chess

    You can also play Hasami Chess by using a chess board and pieces like Hasami Shogi.

    Rules

    The rules are the same as Hasami Shogi with following exceptions or modifications;

    White:
    Pawn a1, b1, c1, d1, e1, f1, g1, h1.

    Black:
    Pawn a8, b8, c8, d8, e8, f8, g8, h8.


    Written by: Katsutoshi Seki, slightly edited by Hans Bodlaender.
    WWW page created: January 2, 1998. Last modified: October 13, 1998.
    ´╗┐

    Comments

    This item is a game information page,
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It is a 2 player game.
It was last modified on: 1998-10-13
 Author: Katsutoshi  Seki. Hasami Shogi. Popular Japanese game, playable with Shogi set. (9x9, Cells: 81)
    2010-05-07 Rich Hutnik Verified as Rich HutnikNoneI am curious about this. Is this game a chess variant? View
    2010-05-05 Daniil Frolov Verified as Daniil FrolovNoneThis game is similar to ancient-European board games (Petteia, Lantruculu, etc.). These games are more ancient than chess. Some people think that these European games are ancestors of chess. And i think, that it's probably true. But i did not hear before that these games went further than India... So, this game was invented indepently from Shogi, just played with Shogi equipment. However, i think, it's interesting to play this with drops, like Shogi. View
    2005-10-23 Roberto Lavieri Verified as Roberto LavieriGood

    Hasami Shogi is an interesting game, I don┤t know about the origins, but it is very different from Shogi, so the name could be any other not associated with Shogi.There are other similar games. I have read that Mak-yek is played in Siam (and Malaysia under the name Apit-sodok) with the same goal, on the same board, but the 16 stones of each player are placed on the first and third row. The moves are the same, but the capture is custodian and also by intervention. Intervention capture is the opposite of custodian. If a stone moves between two enemy stones, it captures both stones. I have not played these variants, but my intuition says to me that they can be much more violent than HS.

    View
    2005-10-22 tiger UnverifiedNoneinteresting. i play a version on brainking.com wherein each player starts with 18 stones and the object is to *either* reduce your opponent to one stone remaining on the board *or* to place five of your own pieces in a row.

    i guess different people play it differently. another site i've seen raises about nine different points on which no-one seems to agree about the rules of this game. :D

    View
    2004-12-13 Ms. Cheese UnverifiedGood

    Hasami Shogi is definately a great game. And it's not as stressful as chess (don't need to think many moves ahead).

    Oddly, the variant i play is different than the one you mention. I play one where the objective is to get 5 of my own pawns in a row (horizontal, vertical, or diagonal). Thus the objective is drastically changed from getting rid of your opponents pieces, to getting 5 in a row of your own.

    View
    Number of ratings: 3, Average rating: Good, Number of comments: 6

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    Credits

    Author: Katsutoshi Seki.

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    http://www.chessvariants.com/shogivariants.dir/hasami.html
    Last Modified: Sun, 01 Apr 2012 20:51:01 -0400
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    Last modified: Sunday, April 1, 2012