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The Diamond Set

Introduction

 

 

 

A Lacework of Strands

A Book by Shaye-Alexander Ellis Nicholls of Merridonia

 

 

taken from

A Leap of Recreation™

also by the same author

 

and

 

with reference and thanks to

Tiger’s-eye Games

by Glenn Nicholls

 

 

© Copyright Shaye-Alexander Ellis Nicholls 2019

 

The moral right to the author’s work herein is asserted by himself, namely Shaye-Alexander Ellis Nicholls of Merridonia.

Merridonian copyright or Copyright of those of Merridonia is without limit, and those of Merridonia are those that have been accepted by the author and stated to be so accepted by the author.

Merridonian copyright requires acceptance by the author.

Trademarks herein are Merridonian trademarks of the author.

Merridonia is a private world by invitation of the author only.

 

With regard to A Lacework of Strands by the author – Shaye-Alexander Ellis Nicholls (SAE Nicholls), as with all parts of A Leap of Recreation and all and any additions to them there can only ever be the granting or the agreement of or for short-term temporary permissions and never long-term or permanent rights or agreements or contracts of any kind, and interpretation of all aspects herein and related to is the reserved right of the author.

The author has full valuation and revaluation rights in all matters relevant to his work and has the right to decide what matters are relevant to his work.

 

 

 

 

A Lacework of Strands takes place in

 

The Median-lands

of

Satellite-world

More often known as Merridonia

 

Where one’s days can be many and where Justice and Fairness have much Regard

 

 

 

 

 

Contents

 

 

General Introduction

General Notes

 

The Games

Blade

Revolver and Chamber

Flagship

 

Further thoughts

Listings

 

 

 

 

General Introduction

There are many what are called card games or paper games as some would classify those here but I would like to think they are something more than just this…..unlike almost all of the games of Steps along the way of Chess there is a definite element of luck involved in a single game of those that follow - but then, for some, this can make the game more enjoyable in some ways to those of Steps and there is little in the way of pieces moving on a board and so A Lacework of Strands can perhaps be thought of as companion and complementary games to Steps. The basic rules of Blade and Revolver are mostly fairly easy to learn and a round of play for them does not take too long whereas Flagship has more complex rules and a game could take up to several hours.

But whatever the differences between the two books of games they are both intended for playing enjoyment for those of all levels and not just experts.

 

Introductory Notes:

A Lacework of Strands can be referred to as Lace or Lacework.

Interpretation of game rules is the reserved right of the author (SAE Nicholls).

Background and representational aspects are noted or described as such or are obvious.

Were A Lacework of Strands to be in book form the presentation would be of a professional standard and not that of an MS Word document as it is here - unfortunately one is limited by such things, but A Lacework of Strands is very much a work in progress and subject to changes as the author sees fit, and the section on Further thoughts gives an indication of this.

 

 

 

 

General Notes

Referees of Flagship may offer the service of moving pieces (helpful if the board is very large), or assist with rules or the settings of clocks etc. and they can enforce the spirit of a game.

Points scored are called Satellite game points or Satellite nominal points to distinguish games in A Lacework of Strands from others, but this is for a future time when.....(currently as Background and Representation).....they will have an official certificate issued (with registration) that will be exchangeable with currency of Merridonia and with the exchange rate for Satellite nominal points initially set at 50% of that for Satellite game points; but the issuing of official certificates for Satellite game/nominal points must be authorised by myself (Shaye Nicholls) and it is not likely they will be so until the future and so for the present time points scored may likely carry no meaningful value - note that there is no right of exchange between Merridonian currency and other currencies.....But, for comparison purposes, how much would a Satellite game point be worth compared to a Western chess point of today (2019).....Well.....I have done a calculation that perhaps gives a very blunt average measure of around 150 GBP at today's values for a Western chess point and this is set out in Steps along the way of Chess.....(another Evergreen – the second, with A Lacework of Strands being the third, as parts of A Leap of Recreation™ are known; the first Evergreen is a story influenced by the JRR Tolkien books of the Silmarillion, the Hobbit and the Lord of the Rings, but this is a long way from completion - see Further thoughts - various, and there is also a short fourth one on Fishing that may become longer, and perhaps a fifth one, but this fifth one is a rather vague and far off possibility only).....To return to points valuation.....what then would be the (very blunt measure) average value of a typical official Satellite game point.....Well.....I would hope for something very much more than this but for this to happen the presentation of the Lacework games would have to be much more interesting and colourful than they are in their current various forms.

 

Setup

 

 

 

 

The Game of Blade

 

Introduction

The game of Blade is based on whist and contract bridge. Whilst there are simplifications in the bidding and scoring of the game to that of contract bridge, there is a new feature called the Balancing Point and this hopefully adds an elusive and interesting challenge to the game – this feature is explained later. Much of the game’s rules follow those of contract bridge and so Blade is explained mainly by comparison to this. Blade can be described as a Fulcrum game.

 

Background

In a future time it has been realized that even in (or particularly in) games of all kinds things should be what they purport to be or shown otherwise, and that rewards should be based on merit more than luck, and also that complexities require rhyme and reason; and so Blade has become popular indeed amongst games based on Whist or Bridge, where Bids are what they say they are and the Balancing-point must be kept in mind whilst Bidding, and where strong (lucky?) hands do not simply or easily lead to runaway scores.

 

Object

The broad object of the game of Blade is, like many Whist-based games, to win as many Tricks (Rounds) as possible and to make scores that build towards an overall winning score.

 

 

Rules:

 

Terminology has been changed as follows

Cards are known as Blades

Suits are known as Regions

Packs (of 52 Cards) are known as Sets (of 52 Blades)

Hands are known as Blade-hands

Trumps are known as Crests

The Contract is known as The Proclamation

Declarer is known as Proclaimer

Dummy is known as The Lookout

Tricks are known as Rounds

Under-tricks are known as Rounds-under

Over-tricks are known as Rounds-over

Passing during the Bidding is known as Declining

 

Regions (suits) have been changed as follows

Spades are known and symboled as Forests

Hearts are known and symboled as Lakes

Diamonds are known and symboled as (Snowcapped) Mountains

Clubs are known and symboled as (River) Waterfalls

No Trumps are known as no Crests

Note - The above is the ranking of Regions (suits) for Blade and in contrast to Contract Bridge no Crests (no Trumps) is lowest for bidding purposes.

 

The rank of the Blades within each Region have been changed as follows

King (picture)

Queen (picture)

Prince (picture)

Princess (picture)

Nine

Eight

Seven

Six

Five

Four

Three

Two

One

 

The Bidding

A Bid to win a certain number of Rounds means precisely what is said, and so a Bid of seven Lakes means that the Bidder has proclaimed to take seven Rounds with Lakes as Crests. There is no upper or lower limit on the number of Rounds that can be Bid i.e. from one to thirteen inclusive, or a player may decline to bid, though he can return to the bidding later. More is said in the general rules section about the ranking of Bids and so forth.

 

The Scoring

One Blade-mark is awarded to the Proclaimer’s partnership for winning the proclaimed number of rounds and in addition one Blade-mark is awarded for each round-over to the Proclaimer’s partnership. If the proclamation is not reached then one Blade-mark is awarded to the defending partnership for each round-under. Upon a Partnership reaching a minimum of six Blade-marks and leading by two or more Blade-marks, or failing this the first Partnership to reach fifteen Blade-marks, then a Holding (of Blade-marks) is made (won) and a new holding begun – any excess Blade-marks (over the minimum required to make the holding) are carried forward to the new holding except when the game is concluded. The game is concluded when a Partnership makes three holdings, and if their opponents have not made a holding a bonus holding is awarded. The game scores can vary between 4-0, 3-1 (2-0 if netted) and 3-2 (1-0 if netted) in holdings to the “Game-winning Partnership” as they are called.

The scoring in Satellite Game points for the Game-winning Partnership is one for each netted holding as explained above and so is four, two or one point(s) and is shared between them as they agree between themselves. The losing Partnership does not receive any points.

Note - The awarding of one Blade-mark for winning the Proclaimed number of Rounds is not one Blade-mark per Round won e.g. if the Proclamation is ten Lakes then the winning of ten Rounds by Proclaimer has one Blade-mark awarded, whilst the winning of eleven Rounds would here have two Blade-marks awarded – an additional one for the Round-over. Also in this example if only nine Rounds were won then the Defending partnership would be awarded one Blade-mark for the Round-under.

 

General Rules

Most remaining rules generally follow those of Contract Bridge, with one or two exceptions. The main remaining rules are listed below:

There are four players at a suitable Table in two Partnerships designated as North-South and East-West though names can also be used and North-South can mean Proclaimer is South.

The last player to Bid is Proclaimer and this Bid is the Proclamation.

Proclaimer’s Partner is called The Lookout (see variation below).

Proclaimer plays The Lookout’s Blade-hand (see variation below).

Defenders are the Partnership not holding the Proclamation.

The Bidding ends when three players have declined successively after a Bid.

Play of Blades is in a clockwise direction.

The lead on the first Round is by the Defender to Proclaimer’s left.

The Lookout must turn his/her Blades upright after the first Blade is played (see variation below).

Players must follow Region if able to do so.

A Round is won by the highest Crest played, or if no Crest is played, the highest Blade of the Region led- this would also apply to a no Crests Proclamation.

A Bid must be higher than the previous Bid.

Bids rank first according to the number Bid, and second according to the Region designated as Crests or no Crests. There is no doubling and so no re-doubling.

The Winner of a Round must lead to the following Round.

Partners may be determined by agreement or by a draw of Blades where number ranks high, followed by rank of Region.

Dealer is determined initially by a draw of Blades where number ranks high followed by rank of Region. The deal then passes to the player on the left of the current dealer thereafter. The Set must be shuffled/cut at all appropriate times. Also fresh and sealed Sets should be brought in at regular intervals.

The player to the left of dealer has the right of first Bid.

Bidding takes place in a clockwise direction.

Should all the players decline to Bid, they must proceed to the next deal.

Clocks are not usually used, though in tournament or match play players would be expected to state their Bid, decline to Bid or play their Blade etc. in no more than one or two minutes or so. Should a player persistently exceed this time, then it is in order for an opponent to insist that this guideline be followed (see Further thoughts - Various).

Two Sets of Blades should be used with a wildlife design on their backs. Designs are shown on both halves of the front and back of Blades.

The Set of Blades listed earlier is called the Royal design Set.

 

Game Variation

If all four players agree then Proclaimer’s partner does not turn his Blades upright and plays his own Blades. If this variation (called Four-handed Blade and the usual variation would be called Three-handed Blade) is chosen it must be played throughout the Match.

Bidding, scoring etc. is the same for Four-handed Blade as with the standard Three-handed game.

Players who prefer Four-handed Blade may form established partnerships and then games.....(or tournaments - sometimes called drives, these can of course also be played with Three-handed Blade. Tournaments are talked of in Further thoughts - Various).....can entirely consist of such partnerships, but if the game is simply called Blade this would be assumed to be Three-handed.

 

A Question of Balance

One of the purposes of the Scoring and Bidding systems was to bring in the idea of a Balancing-point in the Bidding. This can best be illustrated with an example of Blade where the Partnerships are called “NS” (North-South) and “EW” (East-West). We will assume all the players know that NS can take ten Rounds in Lakes and that EW can take six Rounds in Forests and that this is the most Rounds they can win. The Bidding could go as follows:

NS Bid 5 Lakes that gives 5 Rounds-over and 6 Blade-marks to NS

EW Bid 5 Forests that gives 1 Round-over and 2 Blade-marks to EW

NS Bid 6 Lakes that gives 4 Rounds-over and 5 Blade-marks to NS

EW Bid 6 Forests that Breaks-even and gives 1 Blade-mark to EW

NS Bid 7 Lakes that gives 3 Rounds-over and 4 Blade-marks to NS

EW Bid 7 Forests that goes 1 Round-under and gives 1 Blade-marks to NS

NS Bid 8 Lakes that gives 2 Rounds-over and 3 Blade-marks to NS

EW Bid 8 Forests that goes 2 Rounds-under and gives 2 Blade-marks to NS

NS Bid 9 Lakes that gives 1 Round-over and 2 Blade-marks to NS

We have reached the Balancing-point of eight and a half Rounds (the half is somewhat theoretical) where Blade-marks awarded have evened out. In some situations the Balancing-point will be the same number Bids, as would be the case were EW able to take five Rounds in Forests in the above example here. If the Bidding were to continue in the example, the following would apply:

EW Bid 9 Forests that goes 3 Rounds-under and gives 3 Blade-marks to NS

NS Bid 10 Lakes that Breaks-even and gives 1 Blade-mark to NS

EW Bid 10 Forests that goes 4 Rounds-under and gives 4 Blade-marks to NS

NS Bid 11 Lakes that goes 1 Round-under and gives 1 Blade-mark to EW

And so on.

As can be seen, both Partnerships would want to hold the Proclamation below the Balancing-point, but above the Balancing-point both Partnerships would want their opponents to hold the Proclamation. In the above example all the players were assumed to know the whole situation, but in a game of course this would have to be deduced from the Bidding, and the Balancing-point would be a matter of judgement and could change according to the Bidding. The Bidding could also be subjected to disruptive Bids and bluff and counter-bluff.

 

 

General Notes

 

A Sonic-boom

It is just possible (e.g. being 5-4 Blade-marks ahead in a Holding), after Playing a Blade-hand, for the current Holding to be made and for the carrying forward of excess Blade-marks to be sufficiently large (six) to then also immediately make a further Holding, but this would be very rare indeed. Such a happening is called a Sonic-boom. This could be considered as the equivalent of a Grand Slam in Contract Bridge and would require a Blade-hand of at least this sort of calibre, but has additional rarity and difficulty due partly to the Holding score situation needed to bring this about and also due partly to Balancing-point possibilities and complexities. A Sonic-boom would consist of seven Blade-marks awarded by a winning of all the Rounds, though either Partnership could hold the Proclamation.

Note that the key Bidding level for this is seven (the Blade type of seven that is, not the Contract Bridge type of seven).

To restate: A Sonic-boom means a Partnership makes the current and next Holding.

 

A Shock-wave

This is the same as a Sonic-boom except that a further Holding is not also immediately made (due to the current Holding score situation). As with a Sonic-boom seven Blade-marks would be awarded by winning all the Rounds and also as with a Sonic-boom either Partnership could hold the Proclamation.

The key Bidding level for this is seven.

A Shock-wave guarantees a Partnership makes the current Holding.

 

A Quake

This is similar to the above but only requires there to be awarded six Blade-marks by the winning of twelve (or all) of the Rounds and again either Partnership could hold the Proclamation. This could be considered the equivalent of a Small Slam in Contract Bridge.

The key Bidding levels for this are from six to eight.

A Quake guarantees a Partnership is at least ahead in the current Holding.

 

Further Blade-marks

It is possible for a Partnership to be awarded more than seven Blade-marks but this requires the unwitting “co-operation” of the losing Partnership and so is not considered in the above.

 

Crossing the Drawbridge

The manoeuvre known as Entry to Dummy in Contract Bridge is in Blade called Crossing the Drawbridge.

 

Duplicate playing format (see Further thoughts - Name changes etc.)

Much of the current playing of Contract bridge in tournaments etc. is played as 'Duplicate bridge' whereby hands are arranged so that partnership tables play the same cards as other partnership tables - this rather takes luck out of the game of course. Whilst this duplicate playing format can be arranged in the same way for three or four-handed Blade it is not currently an official playing format and no Satellite game or nominal points would, as yet, be scored if so played - this playing format is a distinct very likely future possibility though, particularly for high level tournaments, and could rather be taken as a near certain future probability but not yet quite so. To distinguish the variations of Blade as already described from duplicate variations the description would be random - the four variations would then be called:

Three-handed random Blade

Four-handed random Blade

Three-handed duplicate Blade

Four-handed duplicate Blade

 

If just called Blade the Three-handed random variation would be assumed.

 

 

 

Pieces

 

 

 

The Game of Revolver

 

Introduction

The card game of Revolver is based on the games of Poker and Brag. The rules broadly follow these games but there are differences as indeed there are in the considerably different variations of Poker, though Brag with hands of only three cards has a more usual playing format. Revolver has more in common with Draw Poker and Brag where hands are not seen until a showdown than with Stud Poker where cards are progressively seen, and Revolver has a new and sometimes dramatic feature not in Poker or Brag and that is an Auction for what is called the Community Bullet. Also featured in Revolver is a miniature Banking System centred around what is called the Central Reserve (see Further thoughts - Name changes etc.) and this runs as part of an integrated Business game called Chamber. The broad idea of Chamber came from the bank in the game of Monopoly that in turn derives from a game called The Landlord's Game that seemingly had a part of the board marked as a Bank and was invented by Elizabeth J. Magie.

It is not necessary to integrate Chamber when playing Revolver but of standard this is the case.

 

Background

In the future it is found that the type of game that Poker and Brag are can be represented and mostly replaced by Revolver as being the “Line of Best Fit” for this type of game and so give credence to the skill of players of this type of game by having a standard game. Revolver has hands of four cards and is seen as compact and measured whereas Poker has hands of five cards and Brag, as stated, has three, and Revolver’s new feature of the Community Bullet seems best fitted to four cards - five would have perhaps too little chance of an improvement to hands whereas three would perhaps too often do so and would lead to too much luck in the game.

 

Object

The basic object of Revolver is as with Poker and Brag and is to win “Pools” by having the highest ranking hand in a showdown or by being the only player left contesting a Pool or to be the only player left contesting an entire game. A further object of Revolver is, as with Poker and Brag, to maximise Margins.

 

Rules

Poker and Brag are mostly played for money (Currency) as stakes and there are many what are called house rules, but the following are the official rules of Revolver and Chamber and the Revolver stakes are tokens (that can take the form of what are often called chips or counters) called Bullet-marks and the Chamber Currency is also token (that can take the form of paper 'game money' similar to that used in the game of Monopoly) and usually called 'Sterlings' though it is of course possible to use actual money. The official game of Revolver uses token stakes and token currency – both throughout, and integrates Chamber.

 

Terminology has been changed as follows

Cards are known as Bullets

Suits are known as Territories

Packs (of 52 Cards) are known as Holsters (of 52 Bullets)

Hands are known as Gun-hands

Pools can be known as Bounties

 

Territories (suits) have been changed and rank as follows

Spades are known and symboled as Forests

Hearts are known and symboled as Lakes

Diamonds are known and symboled as (Rocky) Mountains

Clubs are known and symboled as (River) Waterfalls

 

The rank of the Bullets within each Territory have been changed as follows

Marshall (picture)

Sheriff (picture)

Deputy (picture)

Bailiff (picture)

Nine

Eight

Seven

Six

Five

Four

Three

Two

One

Note: the Marshall is always high only and the One is always low only, and so neither are like an Ace of a current pack that can sometimes be used as high or low. Also hands like Rivers - see below, cannot connect 'round the corner' of Marshalls and Ones.

 

 

The ranking of Gun-hands is as follows and has been reset as of 20th August 2018 and can be called the ‘Statistical’ ranking (but see Further thoughts – various, for an alternative ‘Traditional’ ranking)

Note - Equivalent (or nearest to) Poker hands are shown in brackets - there is no equivalent here to a Full house of Poker

 

The Foremost Bridge (All four Aces), that is to hold all four of the Marshalls.

A Primary River (Royal flush), that is to hold the top four Bullets of a Territory e.g. the Marshall, Sheriff, Deputy and Bailiff of Forests.

A Bridge (Four of a kind), that is to hold all four Bullets of a rank other than the Marshalls. For example four Nines would be called a Bridge of Nines.

A River (Straight flush), that is to hold four consecutive ranks of Bullet in the same Territory other than the top four ranks. For example the Seven, Eight, Nine and Bailiff of Waterfalls.

A Crossing (Three of a kind), that is to hold three Bullets of the same rank but where the fourth Bullet is of a different rank.

A Stream (Straight), that is to hold four consecutive ranks of Bullet, but not all in the same Territory.

Stepping-stones (Two pairs), that is to hold two different pairs of Bullets.

A Gathering (Flush), that is to hold four Bullets of the same Territory but that do not run consecutively.

A Match (Pair), that is to hold one pair of same ranked Bullets but two Bullets of different rank to the pair and to each other (see Further thoughts - Name changes etc.).

A Fling (High card), that is none of the above and is described by its highest Bullet as e.g. an Eight Fling.

 

Where Gun-hands are equal, then rank of number(s) and then rank of Territory is used to determine the highest Gun-hand. The standard ideas used in Poker apply also e.g. in two Gatherings the highest numbered Bullet is first used to determine a Winner, then the second highest if necessary, etc. until (if) Territory is needed to be used.

 

https://www.chessvariants.com/membergraphics/MSstepping-stones-of-chess/rv003.png

“Rarities” are collectable for the above four Gun-hands, if any appear, from each player at the Table and are twenty Bullet-marks for the Foremost Bridge, fifteen for a Primary River, ten for a Bridge and five for a River.

Note - “appear” means dealt and not after the Community Bullet has been used – see later.

 

 

Preliminaries (with Chamber integrated)

The players and the Reservist – see below, are seated at a suitable Table (usually specially made) for play that may last up to a full day.

Players are named as they so choose – the author’s would be the Reflex Kid.

The number of players at a Table to initially contest a game is from five to seven, and in addition there is a Reservist (manager) of the Table’s Central Reserve.

All players participating, or likely to do so, now receive the same amount of token Currency to be their (returnable) playing Currency issued from the Central Reserve but the amount depends on the likely number of games and is not sufficient to purchase the required (to commence each game with) 150 Bullet-marks for each game of more than one - e.g. for an expected three games there could be sufficient Currency received by players to purchase 300 Bullet-marks but not 450. This opening Currency balance for players and player numbers is displayed to the Table.

Each player now with his Currency purchases and is issued with 100 Bullet-marks from the Central Reserve.

There is also an unissued reserve of 50 Bullet-marks allocated for each player by the Central Reserve and this is also purchased by each player with his Currency.

The Central Reserve acts as the Table’s bank and contains a sufficient amount of Bullet-marks for the game(s) - sometimes some thousands worth and in various denomination amounts, and there is also a sufficient amount of token Currency in various denomination amounts. Prior to commencement of play all Bullet-marks and all token Currency are held by the Central Reserve, and also sufficient sealed holsters of bullets should be held by the Central Reserve. Also prior to commencement of play, opening balances of Bullet-marks and Currency held by the Central Reserve are displayed to the Table. More is said in the General Rules section and Chamber later.

 

Shown later is a Chamber simulation spreadsheet.

 

Also shown later are two designs of Tables that are called:

The Revolver Table - Symmetrical design and

The Revolver Table - Bullet design.

 

also included is a picture of the Ball-barrel puzzle as a basis for a Barrel – see below.

 

 

 

Order of Play:

The Order of play for what is called a Round consists of parts that are called “Shots”.

These Shots are explained one at a time below and more is said in General Rules later:

 

The First Shot: Enter-in or Out

The players, each in turn from first left of dealer, must each first “Place” five Bullet-marks to be dealt a Gun-hand. This fixed amount (called the “Entrance amount”) is placed in front of them and into their transparent “Barrel” or “Cylinder”.

A player may choose to miss out a particular Round and will then simply state “Withdraw” and not place this amount or receive a Gun-hand, also the deal will “skip” over him if it would have come to him and he is called a “Withdrawer for the Round”. Withdrawing is only allowed three times per player during the course of a game of Revolver - he may stay in his Seat.

A player may also choose to miss all the rest of the game and will simply state “Leave” and is called a “Leaver for the game” - he should leave the Table.

A player may also have to miss the rest of the game (explained later) and will simply state “Finish” and is called “Finished for the game” - he should leave the Table.

A player who has placed the Entrance amount is said "to have Entered-in for the Round" otherwise a player could be said (instead of or as well as the above descriptions) "not to have Entered-in for the Round"

Note: Leavers and Finishers are not barred from the Table’s next or further games.

 

The Second Shot: the Deal

Each player in the Round is dealt four Bullets. The dealer deals one Bullet at a time clockwise to each player in turn. After this, one more Bullet is dealt and placed in the centre of the Table and this is called the Community Bullet. All these Bullets are dealt face-down.

 

The Third Shot: Contest or Decline

The player left of the dealer, who is called First-draw, now has a choice of “Declining” or placing five Bullet-marks (a fixed amount and called the “Amount to contest”) in his barrel. If he declines he does not “Contest the Round” and is called a non-contestant for that Round and is said “not to have Contested for the Round” - but this is not the same as withdrawing as he will have already placed five Bullet-marks for a Gun-hand. If he places the amount to contest of five Bullet-marks he is then contesting and is called a contestant and is said “to have Contested for the Round”.

The player to the left of First-draw has the same choices as does First-draw i.e. to decline or to place the amount to contest of five Bullet-marks in his barrel, but in addition he can “Raise the Placement” by a further five Bullet-marks (only if First-draw has placed his five) and would then place ten Bullet-marks in his barrel.

The next player to the left has a similar three choices as the previous player i.e. to decline and so not contest the Round or; to place the higher of the amount to contest or the previous placement (if any) of Bullet-marks (up to possibly ten) or; to raise the previous placement (if any) by a further five Bullet-marks (up to possibly fifteen).

This process continues for each of the players and so the turn arrives back at the first contestant who will be the first player to the left of the dealer not to decline.

 

Note - Raises here must be the same amount as the amount to contest - five Bullet-marks.

 

The Third Shot ricochet: Match or Decline

The first contestant must now choose to match the highest barrel (if necessary, as there may not have been any raises) by placing the necessary Bullet-marks in his barrel or he must decline and not further contest the Round and he will be said to “not to have Matched for the Round”. This continues for each of the players in turn to the left and so the remaining contestants will then have equal sized barrels and are said “to have Matched for the Round”. Note that contestants may not increase their barrels beyond the amount of the aforesaid highest barrel. 

 

The Fourth Shot: the Community Bullet (see Further thoughts - Name changes etc.)

The Community Bullet is now turned face upwards and the remaining contestants can bid in an Auction to replace any one of their Bullets (that will be discarded face down) with the Community Bullet. The first choice of whether to bid or not is by the first remaining contestant to the left of the dealer and the first bid must be between five and ten Bullet-marks inclusive. Each contestant in turn to the left may make a higher bid by between five and ten Bullet-marks inclusive or state “No Bid” (though he may return to the Bidding later until the Auction is over). The Auction is over when all contestants state no bid consecutively after the winning bidder and then this winning last (and highest) bidder has the Community Bullet. The amount that the winning bidder has bid must be placed in his barrel and this is not returnable unless he wins the Round. Unsuccessful bidders do not have their bids placed in their barrels.

Note - If the player holding the Community Bullet goes on to win the Round and the Community Bullet is the deciding factor in the win it is then known as “the Magic Bullet”.

Note - A player can obtain the Community Bullet and then discard it (but see next note) as he may have wished to stop another player(s) from obtaining it - this could be critical in some situations.

Note - A player obtaining the Community Bullet may also keep this together with his existing four Bullets and then if he participates in the Showdown - see below, he may select his four Bullet Gun-hand from his five Bullets -  this could be a preferred alternative.

Note - It is, I think, preferable for there to be a 'Community barrel' whereby the winning bidder in an auction places his bid in this. This separate barrel would be placed in the centre of the table and would be collected and emptied by the winner of the round and then put back (other barrels are placed in front of players). All barrels should be such that no confusion between them can arise.

Note - The Community Bullet is also mentioned in Further thoughts.

 

The Fifth Shot: Step-up or Decline

The next part (even if there are no bids in the Auction) of the Round is the same as the “Contest or Decline” part (and is here repeated) except that the placements are now double the amounts - the first remaining contestant to left of dealer (called First-draw) has a choice of declining and so not further contesting the Round or placing the fixed amount of ten Bullet-marks called “the Step-up amount” in his barrel.

The player to the left of First-draw has the same choices as does First-draw i.e. to decline or to place the Step-up amount of ten Bullet-marks in his barrel and so “to have Stepped-up for the Round”, but in addition he can raise the placement by a further ten Bullet-marks (if First-draw has placed his ten) and would then place twenty Bullet-marks in his barrel.

The next player to the left has a similar three choices as the previous player i.e. to decline and so “not to have Stepped-up for the Round” or; to place the higher of the Step-up amount or the previous placement of Bullet-marks, if any, (up to possibly twenty) or; to raise the previous placement (if any) by a further ten Bullet-marks (up to possibly thirty).

This process continues for each of the players and so the turn arrives back at the first contestant who will be the first player to the left of the dealer not to decline.

 

Note - Raises here must be the same amount as the Step-up amount - ten Bullet-marks.

 

The Fifth Shot ricochet: Re-match or Decline

The next part of the Round is the same as the “Match or Decline” part (and is here repeated) - the first contestant must now choose to match the highest barrel (if necessary, as there may not have been any raises) by placing the necessary Bullet-marks in his barrel or he must decline and so not further contest the Round and he is said to “not to have Re-matched for the Round”. This continues for each of the players in turn to the left and so the remaining contestants will then have equal sized barrels and are said “to have Re-matched for the Round”. Note that contestants may not increase their barrels beyond the amount of the aforesaid highest barrel.

Note - An amount placed in a barrel by a winning bidder during the Community Bullet Auction must not be counted for either the Fifth Shot or Fifth Shot ricochet parts of the Round.

 

The Sixth Shot: the Showdown

The next and final part of the Round is that the remaining contestants show their Gun-hands and the player with the highest ranking Gun-hand wins the Round and all the amounts in the barrels on the Table (the Round’s Pool or Bounty).

 

Play now proceeds to the next Round.

 

 

General Rules:

The Reservist has some degree of authority over players with regard to enforcing the rules etc. and is the first point of any dispute etc. Also the Reservist can generally supervise a game and perhaps take the dealing of Bullets upon themselves and so forth.

There are fifteen Rounds (maximum) played during a game of Revolver unless two or more players have tied (see below)

If at any time during a Round there is only one contestant left then he will have won the Round and wins all the amounts in the barrels on the Table and he need not show his Gun-hand

Once a player declines he can no longer contest the Round

Amounts placed in barrels are not returned to a player unless he wins the Round

Players do not have to show their Gun-hands unless there is a Showdown and a player can concede a Showdown without showing his Gun-hand

The Bullets rank by number of Rank first that is from one to Marshall (highest) and by Territory (suit) if the number is equal. For example the Seven of Forests ranks higher than the Seven of Lakes but the Seven of Lakes ranks higher than the Six of Forests

The winner of a game of Revolver is the last player left in the game or the player left in the game with the highest total of Bullet-marks at the end of fifteen Rounds. The total Bullet-marks of a player include any unissued reserve allocation of his plus interest (see below). If there are two or more players level on Bullet-marks then one more Round is played just with these players (Withdrawing is not allowed here) and the player then with the highest number of Bullet-marks (including his reserve allocation plus interest) is the winner. When the winner is being decided upon by a count of Bullet-marks then the count of total Bullet-marks must not include any excess Bullet-marks over 150 brought forward for any reason at the beginning of the game; an example would be where the previous winner at a Table has retained and brought forward his excess (see below)

At the end of a game all players return all their Bullet-marks including their reserve allocation with any interest (see below) in excess of 150 (if they have any) to the Central Reserve in exchange for Currency except that the winner can choose to retain all his Bullet-marks

At the end of a game only the winner of the game has the right to choose to stay at the Table if there is another game there and if he does stay he must bring forward all his Bullet-marks. If he does not stay at the Table he must return any excess Bullet-marks over 150 to the Central Reserve in exchange for Currency

For each new game all players must purchase any Bullet-marks necessary to reach and have an issue of 100 Bullet-marks and be allocated with 50 Bullet-marks as a reserve (some players may not need to purchase any Bullet-marks). Note the unit price of Bullet-marks issued and Bullet-marks allocated to reserve is the same

At the end of a game, if there are players waiting to play at the Table then they take up any empty seats first before the losing players can re-enter the new game

A game’s first dealer is decided by high Bullet and by cutting the Bullets or by drawing a Bullet - afterwards the deal moves round one clockwise after each Round of play

Clocks are not usually used in Revolver but players are not expected to delay beyond one or two minutes or so before deciding upon matters such as whether to decline or raise a placement or make a bid in the Auction etc. Players may mention persistently over-long use of time (see Further thoughts - Various)

Holsters of Bullets should be shuffled/cut at all appropriate times and there should be regular changes to fresh and sealed Holsters

The standard Holster with picture designs of Marshalls etc. is called the Revolver design Holster. Holsters of Bullets should have a wildlife design on their backs. Designs are shown on both halves of the front and back of Bullets

The first bid minimum of five Bullet-marks in the Auction for the Community Bullet is called the Community Bullet reserve amount

If a player runs out of sufficient Bullet-marks to continue during a game, but not before, he can request that his reserve (if unissued) of fifty Bullet-marks plus any interest (see below) is issued to him. He cannot take a lesser amount and the Reservist must issue the Bullet-marks and update the records that must show who has been issued their reserve and who has not yet been issued their reserve. This information must be displayed to the players

A player who runs out of Bullet-marks does not have to request his unissued reserve but would then of course have to decline if in process of a current Round

Players cannot transfer Bullet-marks into their reserve

If at any time a player runs out of Bullet-marks and has already had his reserve plus interest issued to him then he must state Finish and miss the rest of the game. He should leave the Table and whatever Bullet-marks are in his barrel will go to the winner of the current Round. He does not owe any Bullet-marks whatever the situation.....but see Further thoughts - Various for updated rules in these situations called the Fallback rules.

 

More specific details of the criteria for a player's reserve plus interest to be issued is as below:

 

A player can request his reserve plus interest be issued to him in order to meet (it must not be less than - except see the aforementioned Fallback rules in Further thoughts - Various) the minimum required stakes to:

Enter-in the round

Contest the round

Match for the round

Make a (successful but not failed) Auction bid

Step-up for the round

Re-match for the round

 

 

Chamber

(Also see Preliminaries earlier)

Although a Table initially consists of five to seven players plus a Reservist there may be more wishing to play at the Table and all these “Participants” (as they are called) will firstly decide upon who is the Reservist for the Table for the Day’s play (see Further thoughts - Various). This is decided upon by all those who wish to be the Reservist offering their Rates of Exchange with Currency for the purchasing and returning of Bullet-marks by players & the amount and level of simple Interest on players’ unissued reserves (a Table for these items follows). After a vote has determined who the Day’s Reservist will be for the Table, the initial five to seven players for the Table are then decided by High Bullet - by the Participants cutting the Bullets or drawing or being dealt a Bullet. The Reservist must manage and account for the Central Reserve for the Day’s play and he or she is not a player. A Reservist will often arrange and organise a day’s play (see Further thoughts - various).

Each time a player reaches the set Interest level for a Round (see the Table that follows) then his reserve, if unissued, is credited from the Central Reserve with from one up to five Bullet-marks inclusive as interest and the records must be updated to show this and displayed to the Table. Crediting of interest does not involve a Currency exchange. The interest amount and level is fixed for the Day and can form excesses/winnings.

Note that the Reservist receives any margin or bears any loss made by the Central Reserve.

Also note that each time there are issues/allocations from or returns to the Central Reserve of Bullet-marks there is an exchange of Currency - but in contrast also note that since players’ reserve allocations are purchased at the beginning of a game there is no Currency exchange when or if the reserve plus any interest is issued to the player during a game.

If a player runs out of Bullet-marks and has insufficient Currency to continue he can no longer participate in the Day’s play and is described as and could or should say “Finished for the Day”.

The token Currency (Sterlings) has a “Median” exchange rate with Bullet-marks of one to one.

At the conclusion of the Day’s last game at a Table all players including the game’s winner must return all their Bullet-marks to the Central Reserve for Currency and now the closing balance of Bullet-marks should be the same as the opening balance.

 

Scoring:

The final steps of the Day’s play for a Table is to declare for all Participants their closing Currency balances, their opening Currency balances and then the differences as being their Currency Margins (or Deficits) for the Day’s play. The Participant with the highest Margin is then called the “Overall Winner for the Day” who can of course be the Reservist. Note that the highest Margin is actual and not percentage. Finally all Currency is then returned to the Central Reserve and the closing balance should be the same as the opening balance.

Satellite game points are then scored as follows: three for the Overall Winner for the day, two for the player with the second highest margin with one for the player with the third highest margin and one Satellite nominal point is awarded for the player with the fourth highest margin - the Reservist can be any of these four. These points are not scored though if any of these has a deficit.

It is possible of course to play Revolver with just Bullet-marks and without Chamber integrated, but if Satellite game/nominal points are scored/awarded then Chamber must be integrated and the official game rules played - if the game is simply described as Revolver the integration of Chamber would be assumed.

 

Table of Reservist’s Rates, Levels & Amounts:

The following are what the Reservist may offer and they are all fixed for the Day’s Play once accepted and must all be displayed to players at the Table – token currency here is Sterlings:

 

Firstly for players purchasing Bullet-marks – The standard rate for the Reservist to charge for all players is the Median exchange rate of 1.00 Sterling for one Bullet-mark, but to cover his extra time and/or costs of arranging the central reserve etc. he may charge a small amount more but this must be authorised, or alternately he may choose to receive one Satellite nominal point instead - this award is additional and is not taken from the total of points scored/awarded for the day's play.

 

Secondly for players returning Bullet-marks – The Reservist may offer for all players one of three rates of Sterling for each returned Bullet-mark:

0.95 Sterlings for each Bullet-mark returned.

0.90 Sterlings for each Bullet-mark returned.

0.85 Sterlings for each Bullet-Mark returned.

 

Thirdly the Level that Simple interest is credited to players by the Reservist – The Reservist may offer one of three levels for all players whereupon players are credited with an amount of Bullet-marks provided their reserve is unissued:

When a player Contests for a Round.

When a player Matches for a Round.

When a player Re-matches for a Round.

 

Notes:

Matching for a Round ensures a player can participate in the Auction.

Re-matching for a Round ensures a player can participate in the Showdown.

 

Fourthly the Reservist may offer to all players one of five amounts of Interest to be credited to players each time they reach the required Level provided their reserve is unissued:

One Bullet-mark.

Two Bullet-marks.

Three Bullet-marks.

Four Bullet-marks.

Five Bullet-marks.

 

 

 

A Chamber simulation spreadsheet, Tables & Ball-barrel puzzle

 

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This interesting puzzle consists of twenty three balls of six different colours (4 of 5 and 3 of 1) that can be revolved by two sections of the puzzle and moved up and down at three places; the picture shows the required solution to the puzzle (unfortunately the puzzle is a little tatty now), it is perhaps as hard as the better known puzzle of Rubik’s Cube is to solve or possibly harder - it took me longer to solve this Ball-barrel Puzzle than Rubik’s Cube and I have also invented a variation of Rubik’s Cube called the Runich Dice, also not easy to solve I found, and this, and Rubik’s Cube, are talked of in Steps along the way of Chess.

 

 

Rules

 

 

 

The Game of Flagship

 

Contents

Introduction

The Players and Sides

The Settings

Background

Object

Board before Deployment

Rules - First section, dealing with preliminaries

Rules - Second section, detailing naval items

Rules - Third section, dealing with the order of play

Rules - Fourth section, that describes reporting requirements

Rules - Fifth section, with sundry rules and other items

Examples and Painting of Modern Flagships

Example and Painting of a Giant Gun

Deployment Table

Information Table

 

 

Introduction

Flagship is a game that is based upon a game invented by Hubert Phillips called Naval War Game that is itself derived from the game usually called Battleships that is probably about a century old.

Naval War Game can be found in Hubert Phillips 1961 book More Indoor Games for two Players (though originated earlier) and I agree with him when he says here that it is a fascinating game, and with Flagship I have tried to bring in additional excitement and tension, mostly by the introduction of Flagships and these could, at least to some extent, be considered as the equivalent of a ‘Royal piece’ in Chess.

The rules are more complex than Blade or Revolver and a number of practice games may be required for Persons to familiarise themselves with the rules.

The Game can be considered or visualised with Ships etc. of different times from Sailing ships up to the great modern Battleships and examples are given at the end of these modern Battleships with approxiamate specifications; also an example is given of a giant Gun that is part of the game. In addition the game can also be visualised with more modern Aircraft and where the game is visualised as modern there are some changes to the rules and these are stated where applicable. There are also two deployment variations (restricted and free – though there are still some restrictions) for both these game variations and this is also stated where applicable and additionally set out in a deployment table at the end; and so there are four variations in all designated as:

Medieval, Restricted deployment variation

Medieval, Free deployment variation

Modern, Restricted deployment variation

Modern, Free deployment variation

 

What variation is played is decided by arrangement or by way of card or by rolls of dice or coin.

If the game is simply described as Flagship then this would be assumed to be the Modern, Free deployment variation.

 

 

The Players and Sides

The Northern Admiral, who commands

The Northern Fleet, and who may be assisted by

The Northern Captain

and

The Southern Admiral, who commands

The Southern Fleet, and who may be assisted by

The Southern Captain

 

The Settings

The Seas of Atlanta comprising:

North Atlanta

South Atlanta

The Great Divide

 

Background

Two great powers have been at conflict with each other for control of major trade routes for as long as anyone can remember and sporadic clashes have occurred at Sea but these have not been decisive. The Kingdoms (see Further thoughts - Name changes etc.) of the two adversaries are widely separated by the Seas of Atlanta and this has led to a situation whereby there have been no Battles of any note occurring on Land, but both powers have steadily built up their Navies and have now set forth and occupied their areas of the Seas to attempt to cripple or destroy the other’s fleet in order to gain control of these trade routes.

The Northern kingdom is called Aurora Kingdom

The Southern kingdom is called Waterfall Kingdom

 

Object

The object of the game is to score the higher number of Naval-marks and to sink the opposing Flagship - this wins the Battle (game).

 

 

The Board before deployment

 

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Notes on the Board:

The board comprises of two Seas each of 15 x 15 squares that are separated by the Great Divide – an archipelago. Admirals are not allowed, during deployment or play, to see each other’s board area (Sea) of North or South Atlanta and the Great Divide can be a screen to ensure this. Boards can be very large.

Squares are usually called Positions or mostly so as Sectors.

There are several ways to designate (locate) sectors, one (shown) is that files (Longitude) are designated A to O (west to east) and that ranks (Latitude, but excluding the Great Divide) are simply designated 01 to 30 (south to north). Longitude is stated first. The Great Divide is referred to by name but can in addition use Longitude designations.

Although it is possible for Ships to move between North and South Atlanta the route is not straightforward and would leave Ships too open to attack in the situation and so the Battle takes place with the Ships at anchor.

 

 

 

Rules - First section

This section sets out the preliminaries to a game.

Firstly what variation is to be played is decided along with who has first move and choice of sides (see Information Table).

 

Navies and their cost

At the commencement of the game each Admiral (player) has 100 Chests of Currency issued to them by their Kingdom’s treasury to spend on their respective Navies that consist of ships, aircraft, ordnance and personnel and each Admiral must spend at least 40 but no more than 60 of these Chests on ships. After/alongside this spending the Admirals deploy their Navies’ various items (pieces) to their respective seas and also to their land areas as the Admirals also form such land as they require on their seas. After deployment the Admirals will take turns in the use of their Navies.

The available items and their cost are as follows:

 

Land:

Land 3x3 – no cost

Land 2x2 – no cost

 

Ships:

Flagships + items – no cost but only one per side is allocated in Primary Phase

Battleships – 4 Chests each

Medieval - (Floating) Platforms – 4 Chests each

Modern - Aircraft carriers – 4 Chests each

Large ships – 3 Chests each

Medium ships – 2 Chests each

Small ships – 1 Chest each

Note that Platforms and Aircraft carriers are equivalents.

 

Personnel/Aircraft/Anti-aircraft Missiles:

Observers – no cost

Medieval - Eagles (Spotters) – 1 Chest each

Modern - Reconnaissance aircraft – 1 Chest each

Medieval - Bowmen with 1 arrow – 1 Chest each

Modern – Anti-aircraft Missiles – 1 Chest each

Note that Eagles and Reconnaissance aircraft are equivalents

Note that Bowmen and Anti-aircraft Missiles are equivalents

 

Ordnance/Bombers:

Medieval - Giant guns with 1 projectile – 10 Chests each – maximum of three per side allowed

Modern - Giant missiles – 10 Chests each – maximum of three per side allowed

Medieval - Large guns with 1 projectile – 3 Chests each

Modern – Bombers with 1 Heavy bomb – 3 Chests each

Standard guns with 2 projectiles – 1 Chest each

Underground guns with 3 projectiles – 2 Chests each

Armoured shielding 3x3 array of plates – 2 Chests each

Repeating guns–no cost but only one per side is allocated in Secondary Phase

 

Note that Giant guns and Giant missiles are equivalents as are Large guns and Bombers.

 

 

 

 

Rules - Second section

This rather lengthy section describes the deployment, use and capabilities of the items set out in the first section

 

 

Land:

Land may be entered (deployed, formed or placed) onto an Admiral’s sea at no cost and without limit as to the amount and placing except for the limits of the board itself and the deployment of ships. Land can be placed as blocks of 3x3 or 2x2 (shown below) and these blocks can adjoin one another or the edges and/or corners of the board. It is a requirement of all Admirals that they place some land blocks.

Land positions can be described as occupied or unoccupied. Sea positions can also be described as occupied or unoccupied but if unoccupied are often called empty sea.

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After deployment is finished Land may not be removed or moved, added to or subtracted from for the rest of the game.

 

 

Ships:

Ships may be deployed on any empty Sea positions but may not adjoin or overlap other Ships and even their corners may not touch. Ships may however adjoin Land positions including any corners and adjoin the edges and/or corners of the board and they may be positioned horizontally or vertically but not diagonally. The number each side deploys of each denomination of Ship depends on their spending, except that each side has and deploys one Flagship. The positions a Ship covers are often called their sections and sections can be described as occupied or unoccupied or as undamaged or damaged.

Ships, as will be seen, can be in three self-explanatory states and these are described as:

Afloat and undamaged.

Afloat but damaged.

Sunk.

The significance of these three states is explained later. Sunken Ships are taken off the board. Damaged Ships have their damaged sections distinguished by being coloured grey instead of their undamaged colours (described later). If a particular section of a Ship is damaged more than once during the course of a game this does not change anything from when the particular section was damaged just once – if, however, all the sections of a Ship are damaged then the Ship sinks.

Ships, other than a Flagship during the Primary engagement phase, may not be moved during either engagement phase (explained later) except to remove sunken Ships.

 

Flagships

Flagships, of that there is only one for each side, occupy five positions in a straight line that is stated as linear 5x1 (length x width). These Ships fly their side’s Naval Flag (fixed in their centres), though they are decorative only and have no cost. Flagships have no cost and also come (at no cost) with one Bowman/Anti-aircraft Missile situated in the centre section, also two Large Guns with projectiles are situated, one each, on the two sections next to the Bowman/Anti-aircraft Missile and two Standard Guns with projectiles are situated, one each, on the two end sections. In addition plates of Armoured Shielding are situated on each of the five sections of the Flagship. Nothing further than the above items may be deployed on a Flagship.

 

Moving a Flagship

In the Primary phase (explained later) this specific move is allowed to be made once during engagement. The move (often called changing the Flagship’s anchorage) is carried out by moving all five sections of the Flagship in unison one position either north, south, east, west, north-east, north-west, south-east or south-west i.e. eight possible moves. The resulting position must not infringe any rule such as those relating to Ships adjoining or touching, or plates of Armoured Shielding overlapping.

 

Battleships

Battleships occupy a linear 4x1 set of positions. Battleships may have Standard Guns singly deployed on one or more of their sections and, if free deployment, may have Bowman/Anti-aircraft Missiles so deployed, but nothing else may be deployed on them.

 

Floating platforms/Aircraft carriers

Floating platforms (can simply be called Platforms) and Aircraft carriers - these occupy a 2x2 set of positions and they may have Eagles (Spotters)/Reconnaissance aircraft singly deployed on one or more of their sections and, if free deployment, may have Bowman/Anti-aircraft Missiles so deployed and Aircraft carriers may have Bombers so deployed on them whether restricted or free deployment, but nothing else may be deployed on them.

 

Large Ships

Large ships occupy a linear 3x1 set of positions and, if free deployment, may have Bowman/Anti-aircraft Missiles or Standard guns singly deployed to one or more of their sections, they may not have anything else deployed on them.

 

Medium Ships

Medium ships occupy a linear 2x1 set of positions and, if free deployment, may have Bowman/Anti-aircraft Missiles or Standard guns singly deployed to one or more of their sections, they may not have anything else deployed on them.

 

Small Ships

Small ships occupy a linear 1x1 position and, if free deployment, may have a Bowman/Anti-aircraft Missile or a Standard gun deployed to their section, they may not have anything else deployed on them.

 

 

 

Personnel/Aircraft/Anti-aircraft Missiles:

 

Observers

Observers are, prior to the commencement of the game, situated on the Great Divide and they report on the happenings of the game, as described later. may also move personnel and other Navy items where required and count or assist in counting Naval-marks. There are several for each side and they also act as rescuers of any personnel including Eagles who need rescuing from the seas or land. do not actively and directly participate in the battle, however. must act with complete integrity when reporting etc.

Note that Observers are required for any meaningful Game or Tournaments or Matches or suchlike.

 

Eagles and Reconnaissance aircraft

Eagles are also called Spotters and these creatures act as reconnaissance - note that there is no difference between these and the modern equivalents of Reconnaissance aircraft. These can be deployed singly on an unoccupied position of Land or singly on an unoccupied position (section) of a Platform or an Aircraft carrier.

 

Note that the following regarding Eagles also applies to Reconnaissance aircraft

Each Eagle can only be used once during a game and if and when he is used the Eagle is dispatched to fly to a specified opposing position whereupon the exact and full dispositions of this position and all the adjacent eight positions are seen by the Eagle and reported to his Admiral via an Observer, unless he is shot down (see Bowmen/Anti-aircraft Missiles below).

At deployment an Eagle is described as an undispatched Eagle and his wings are closed to signify this. When (if) he is dispatched then his wings are open and he is now (briefly) described as a dispatched Eagle. If the Eagle/Aircraft is then shot down by an opposing Bowman/Anti-aircraft Missile he is described as a downed Eagle/Aircraft and (being rescued by allied Observers) he is then placed on (or around) the Great Divide together with the arrow/missile that he was shot down with and he plays no further part in the game. If the Eagle/Aircraft is not shot down then he reports his information to an allied Observer and lands on the Great Divide as a spent (tired and exhausted or out of fuel if an Aircraft) Eagle and his wings are now closed and he plays no further part in the game.

Eagles may not be moved during what is called the Primary engagement phase (explained later) of the game except as described above or described later.

 

Bowmen

If deployment is restricted these can only be deployed singly on an unoccupied position of land (but see Flagships), or if free deployment also singly deployed on any other ships on unoccupied sections. A Bowman has a long-range Bow with only one exceptionally long and accurate arrow in a quiver.

Each Bowman can only be used once during a game and this occurs if and when an opposing Eagle is dispatched to his position or any of the adjacent eight positions to this. The Bowman can then shoot down the Eagle (with an arrow through the wing) and so the dispositions that the Eagle would or might have seen are not reported. The Bowman’s Admiral may, however, choose not to use the Bowman and so may allow the Eagle to return and report dispositions as described above (that would include the positioning of the Bowman). The Bowman is then still available for possible use on a later turn.

At deployment a Bowman is described as an armed Bowman and this is signified by his quiver containing his one arrow. When and if he has shot down an Eagle then he is described as an unarmed Bowman and this is signified by his quiver being empty – an unarmed Bowman retires from the Battle and moves to the Great Divide and plays no further part in the game.

Bowmen may not be moved during what is called the Primary engagement phase (explained later) of the game except to move them to the Great Divide as described above or described later.

 

Anti-aircraft Missiles

Deployment of these is the same as for Bowmen.

These missiles can only be used once in a game if and when an opposing Reconnaissance aircraft or a Bomber (note the difference to a Bowman) is dispatched to the missile’s position or any of the adjacent eight positions to this. The missile can then shoot down the aircraft and so the dispositions are not reported, as with Bowman, or the Bomber does no damage. As with Bowman however, the Admiral may choose not to use an Anti-aircraft Missile.

Anti-aircraft Missiles may not be moved during what is called the Primary engagement phase (explained later) of the game except to take them off the board when used or to move them to the Great Divide as described later.

 

 

 

Ordnance/Bombers:

The Guns fired in the course of the Battle are built to fire at very long ranges with accuracy. This requirement causes great stresses to the guns when being fired and so they can only fire one or a very few projectiles before becoming damaged and inoperable (apart from Repeating Guns).

After being deployed Ordnance items may not be moved during the game except when removing them from the board as described below.

There is some repetition in the following descriptions.

 

Giant guns/Giant missiles

These are the largest guns/missiles in the battle but they are not nuclear.

An Admiral may not purchase more than three of these guns/missiles and they can only be singly deployed to an unoccupied Land position. Each gun comes with one projectile.

The forces, stresses and resulting damage to the gun caused by firing such a huge projectile means that a Giant gun can only be used (fired) once in a game whereupon the projectile is fired to and lands upon a specified opposing position and devastates a 5x5 set of positions that the specified position is the centre of – the same occurs with a Giant missile. Armoured Shielding is completely ineffective as a protection against the projectile or missile. Details of what happens on these 25 devastated positions are that:

Against such huge projectiles/missiles plates of Armoured shielding (explained later) are of no protection to whoever or whatever occupies the positions and the plates are wrecked and are of no further use and unrepairable. Wrecked plates are, then, thrown into the sea (taken off the board).

Any undispatched Eagles are badly wounded and totally incapacitated as are any armed Bowmen and these Personnel are rescued by allied Observers and taken to the Great Divide. They are, then, placed on (or around) the Great Divide and described as badly wounded Personnel and they play no further part in the game. Reconnaissance aircraft and Anti-aircraft Missiles are rendered inoperable and are also placed on or around the Great Divide.

Any Ship’s sections are damaged and as already stated once all of a Ship’s sections are damaged the Ship sinks. Any Personnel or items of Ordnance occupying these sections suffer the same fate as those occupying land positions.

Giant guns/Giant missiles, Large guns/Bombers and Standard guns (but not Underground Guns), are severely damaged and unuseable and unrepairable as are any of their projectiles or bombs. These are cleared from the area and thrown into the sea (taken off the board).

At deployment a Giant gun is described an operable and this is signified by its nearby projectile. After firing its projectile (that is then removed from the board) the Gun is described as inoperable and is moved to the Great Divide for possible salvage and plays no further part in the game.

 

Large guns

Large guns are somewhat smaller than Giant guns and they and their projectiles are not specially made as are Giant guns. Large guns can only be singly deployed to an unoccupied land position (but see Flagships). Each Large gun comes with one projectile.

The forces, stresses and resulting damage to the gun caused by firing their large projectile means that a large Gun can only be used (fired) once in a game whereupon the projectile is fired to and lands upon a specified opposing position and damages a 3x3 set of positions of that the specified position is the centre. Armoured shielding is, however, effective as a protection against the projectile. Details of what happens on these 9 damaged positions are that:

Any positions that are protected by plates of Armoured shielding have no damage done to whoever or whatever occupies them, but these plates themselves are severely damaged and are of no further use and unrepairable. Damaged plates are, then, thrown into the Sea (taken off the board).

Any undispatched Eagles are wounded and totally incapacitated as are any armed Bowmen and these Personnel are rescued by allied Observers and taken to the Great Divide. They are, then, placed on (or around) the Great Divide and described as wounded Personnel and they play no further part in the game. Reconnaissance aircraft and Anti-aircraft Missiles are rendered inoperable and are also placed on or around the Great Divide.

Any Ship’s sections are damaged and as already stated once all of a Ship’s sections are damaged the Ship sinks. Any Personnel or items of Ordnance occupying these sections suffer the same fate as those occupying land positions.

Giant guns/Giant missiles, Large guns/Bombers and Standard guns (but not Underground Guns), are severely damaged and unuseable and unrepairable as are any of their projectiles or bombs. These are cleared from the area and thrown into the sea (taken off the board).

At deployment a Large gun is described as operable and this is signified by its nearby projectile. After firing its projectile (that is then removed from the board) the Gun is described as inoperable and is moved to the Great Divide for possible salvage and plays no further part in the game.

 

Bombers

Bombers are as Large guns except that:

They can also be singly deployed to an unoccupied Aircraft carrier section as well as that on land.

They can be shot down by an Anti-aircraft Missile as already described.

The bomb they carry is a heavy one and Armoured shielding is no defence and so the resulting damage is as that of a giant gun/Giant missile except that the devastated positions are 3x3 centred around where the bomber is dispatched to and not 5x5.

 

Standard Guns

Standard guns are considerably smaller than Large guns and they and their projectiles are widely made. Standard guns can be singly deployed to an unoccupied Land position or singly deployed to an unoccupied section on a Battleship (but see Flagships), or if free deployment, deployed so on large, medium or small Ships. Each Standard gun comes with two projectiles. A Standard gun can fire one or two projectiles on a turn as decided by the Admiral and if firing one projectile then the remaining projectile can be fired at a later turn.

The forces, stresses and resulting damage to the gun caused by firing their projectiles means that a Standard gun can only be used (fired) twice in a game whereupon the one or two projectiles are fired to and land upon one or two specified opposing positions and damage the specified one or two positions. Armoured shielding is, however, effective as a protection against the projectiles. Details of what happens on these damaged positions are that:

Any positions that are protected by plates of Armoured shielding have no damage done to whoever or whatever occupies them, but these plates themselves are severely damaged and are of no further use and unrepairable. Damaged plates are, then, thrown into the Sea (taken off the board).

Any unprotected undispatched Eagles are wounded and totally incapacitated as are any unprotected armed Bowmen and these Personnel are rescued by allied Observers and taken to the Great Divide. They are, then, placed on (or around) the Great Divide and described as wounded Personnel and they play no further part in the game.

Any unprotected Ship’s sections are damaged and as already stated once all of a Ship’s sections are damaged the Ship sinks. Any Personnel or items of Ordnance occupying these sections suffer the same fate as those occupying Land positions.

Any unprotected Giant guns/Giant missiles, Large guns/Bombers and Standard guns (but not Underground Guns), are severely damaged and unuseable and unrepairable as are any of their projectiles or bombs. These are cleared from the area and thrown into the sea (taken off the board).

At deployment a Standard gun is described as an operable Standard gun and this is signified by its nearby projectiles. After firing both of its projectiles (that are removed from the board as and when fired) the Standard gun is described as an inoperable Standard gun and is moved to the Great Divide for possible salvage and plays no further part in the game.

 

Underground Guns

These are of a similar size to Standard guns though they and their projectiles are not widely made and are somewhat rare. As their name suggests they are situated underground but are raised to the surface when firing; after firing they are retracted back to their underground position where they are safe from attack or damage by any Naval item, even Giant guns/Giant/missiles; they can, however, be detected and reported by dispatched Eagles whose sharp eyes can see the signs of Underground guns even if covered by Armoured shielding and they can also be detected by Reconnaissance aircraft as they have the equipment to do this.

Underground guns can only be singly deployed to an unoccupied Land position. Each Underground gun comes with three projectiles. An Underground gun can fire one, two or three projectiles on a turn as decided by the Admiral and if firing one or two projectiles then the remaining projectile or projectiles can be fired at a later turn(s).

The forces, stresses and resulting damage to the gun caused by firing their projectiles means that an Underground gun can only be used (fired) three times in a game whereupon the one, two or three projectiles are fired to and land upon one, two or three specified opposing positions and damage the specified one, two or three positions. Armoured shielding is, however, effective as a protection against the projectiles. Details of what happens on these damaged positions are that:

Any positions that are protected by plates of Armoured shielding have no damage done to whoever or whatever occupies them, but these plates themselves are severely damaged and are of no further use and unrepairable. Damaged plates are, then, thrown into the Sea (taken off the board).

Any unprotected undispatched Eagles are wounded and totally incapacitated as are any unprotected armed Bowmen and these Personnel are rescued by allied Observers and taken to the Great Divide. They are, then, placed on (or around) the Great Divide and described as wounded Personnel and they play no further part in the game.

Any unprotected Ship’s sections are damaged and as already stated once all of a Ship’s sections are damaged the Ship sinks. Any Personnel or items of Ordnance occupying these sections suffer the same fate as those occupying Land positions.

Any unprotected Giant guns/Giant missiles, Large guns/Bombers and Standard guns (but not Underground Guns), are severely damaged and unuseable and unrepairable as are any of their projectiles or bombs. These are cleared from the area and thrown into the sea (taken off the board).

At deployment an Underground gun is described as an operable Underground gun and this is signified by its nearby projectiles that are stored with the Gun. After firing all of its projectiles (that are removed from the board as and when fired) the Underground gun is described as an inoperable Underground gun and is moved to the Great Divide for possible salvage and plays no further part in the game.

 

Armoured Shielding

This consists of nine armoured plates that are in a 3x3 interlinked array. Armoured shielding can only be deployed to Land positions that may be occupied or unoccupied (but see Flagships). The position of deployment is the centre of the 3x3 position array and must be such that plates do not overlap with the plates of other Armoured shielding that have been deployed (or are situated on a Flagship) – their method of construction prevents this. It is allowed for the deployment position to be on the edge or corner of Land blocks and so plates can extend to cover Sea positions and therefore protect sections of Ships and their occupants (whether Personnel and/or Ordnance and also Aircraft). If the positioning of the array is such that nine positions are not covered (for example the edge of the board) then there is no compensation for this - this point would also apply to other situations e.g. the firing of a Giant missile or a Large Gun etc.

It is not allowed to deploy individual plates – they are made at an economical array size and they are impractical to break up and so the array as a whole must be deployed. Flagships however come already with a special array of 5x1 plates covering each of their five sections.

The use of Armoured shielding as protection is automatic and an Admiral does not have the option to defer their use to a later turn as he does with e.g. a Bowman.

The use of Armoured shielding does not constitute an Admiral’s turn of play.

As already described a plate of Armoured shielding can only be used for protection once and whoever or whatever was protected on the position or section is then not protected any more.

In many situations not all of the plates in an array are used, for example there may be several hits on plates in an array by an Underground gun or a Large gun but the remaining plates in the array that are not hit can still be used.

As already stated Armoured shielding cannot protect against the projectiles of a Giant gun, a Giant missile or a Heavy bomb. Also a dispatched Eagle or Reconnaissance aircraft can see and report what a plate protects as well as see and report the plate itself.

 

The following lists every item that a plate of Armoured shielding can protect once against:

A Large gun’s projectile.

A Standard gun’s projectile.

An Underground gun’s projectile.

 

The following lists every item that is protected from damage or wounding if a plate of Armoured shielding covers the position or Ship’s section they are occupying. Projectiles/bombs are also protected.

An Eagle/Reconnaissance aircraft

A Bowman/Anti-aircraft missile

Sections of Ships and their occupants, if there are any (Personnel or Ordnance, also Aircraft)

Giant guns/Giant missiles

Large guns/Bombers

Standard guns

Underground guns do not require the protection of Armoured shielding but if any are covered by plates then this is in order

 

Where an item can fire more than one projectile on an Admiral’s turn, e.g. a Standard gun, then if the first and second projectiles are directed to the same position (or section) and that position is covered by a plate of Armoured shielding, then the first projectile would be protected against but not the second, and any occupant of the position would then be damaged or wounded.

As can be seen, any position (Land or Sea) or Ship’s section can be described as protected or unprotected.

Plates of Armoured shielding are not classed as occupants of positions or Ship’s sections as are other items of Personnel or Ordnance or Aircraft.

 

Repeating Guns

These are deployed and used only if there is a Secondary Phase (explained later) in the Battle and so they are described later.

 

The Great Divide

is off the board so far as the deployment, use and capabilities of the Naval items are concerned except for what is specifically described.

 

 

 

 

Rules - Third section

This section describes the order of play and what takes place during the game's phases

 

Order of Play:

The game has two phases, first of that is the Primary phase, and second of that is the Secondary phase. The Primary phase consists of a spending stage, a deployment stage and an engagement stage. The Secondary phase consists of a repair and re-deployment stage and an engagement stage. In the Primary phase the spending and deployment stages can overlap and/or run alongside each other. At the end of each phase there is a stage of counting of Naval-marks (explained later). The stages are then:

Primary phase – spending and deployment

Primary phase – engagement

First counting of Naval-marks

Secondary phase – repair and re-deployment

Secondary phase – engagement

Final counting of Naval-marks

 

The game may however end before a Secondary phase is reached (explained below). Scoring takes place when the Battle (game) ends. The following is carried out during the above stages:

 

Primary phase – spending and deployment

During this stage each Admiral decides how he will spend his 100 Chests of currency on the available Naval items and how he will deploy the Ships, Personnel and Ordnance and Aircraft that he purchases. Also he will decide where to place Land blocks and where to deploy his Flagship. The Admiral may be assisted during this stage by his Captain. During this stage it is not allowed for an Admiral or Captain to see their opponent’s board (Sea) or to obtain any information as to their opponent’s activities.

 

Primary phase – engagement

After both Admirals have completed their spending and deployment the game moves to the engagement stage and each Admiral will take alternate turns in the use of their Naval items. During this stage an Admiral is not allowed to be assisted by his Captain and neither an Admiral nor a Captain is allowed to see their opponent’s board (Sea) or to obtain any information other than what is properly reported.

On his turn, before an Admiral can take an action (listed below) himself, he must first take into account and put into place the effects (if any) on his own Navy of the action of his opponent’s immediately preceding turn.

 

The possible Primary phase - engagement actions that can be taken (none are compulsory) on a turn are:

To dispatch an undispatched Eagle/Reconnaissance aircraft to an opponent’s board (Sea). The Admiral must choose a specific Eagle/Reconnaissance aircraft.

To shoot down a dispatched opposing Eagle/Reconnaissance aircraft with an armed Bowman/Anti-aircraft Missile. The Bowman/Anti-aircraft Missile must be a specific one.

To fire an operable Giant gun or fire a Giant missile. The Admiral must choose a specific Giant gun/Giant missile.

To fire an operable Large gun. The Admiral must choose a specific Large gun.

To dispatch an undespatched Bomber to an opponent’s board (Sea). The Admiral must choose a specific Bomber.

To shoot down a dispatched opposing Bomber with an Anti aircraft missile. The Anti-aircraft Missile must be a specific one.

To fire an operable Standard gun. The Admiral must choose a specific Standard gun.

To fire an operable Underground gun. The Admiral must choose a specific Underground gun.

To move (change the anchorage of) the Flagship. This is allowed only once and only during the Primary phase - engagement.

Only one action can be taken on a turn. It is not compulsory to take an action at all on a turn and sometimes not possible to take an action as items start to become exhausted and where this happens an Admiral must state “No Action”. A turn can consist of up to three parts as follows:

Firstly as stated above the effects of the opposing Admiral’s immediately preceding action must be put into place

Secondly there must be reporting as is explained later

Thirdly the Admiral must then take his own action or state no action

Note that not all three of the above occur on every turn

 

The Primary phase – engagement stage ends as follows:

If all the Ships of one of the Navies are sunk then the phase, and the game, immediately ends and an Admiral must state all his Ships are sunk immediately this is so.

If there are four successive statements of “No Action” involving both Admirals then the phase ends.

 

First counting of Naval-marks

At the end of the Primary phase – engagement stage there is a first counting of Naval-marks where the following procedure is carried out for each Navy:

Ships that are afloat and undamaged are awarded one Naval-mark for each of their sections and so, for example, an undamaged Large ship is awarded three Naval-marks.

Ships that are afloat but damaged are also awarded one Naval-mark for each of their sections including the sections that are damaged. For example a Battleship may have three of the four sections damaged but would still remain afloat and would be awarded four Naval-marks.

Ships that have been sunk are not awarded any Naval-marks and have already been taken off the board.

The total number of Naval-marks awarded are added up for each Navy and the winning Admiral (player) is the one whose total is the higher and he has won the Battle (game) unless the Admiral with the lower number of Naval-marks still has his Flagship afloat, even if (and however much) damaged. In this situation the game moves to the Secondary phase and the Primary phase is described as inconclusive.

If the total number of Naval-marks awarded is the same for each Navy, regardless of whether either Flagship is afloat or not, then the game moves to the Secondary phase and the Primary phase is also described as inconclusive.

As can be seen, an Admiral whose Ships have all been sunk will have lost the Battle as he will have no Naval-marks or Flagship afloat whilst his opponent will have at least one Naval-mark and it is not a requirement to have one’s Flagship afloat in order to win the game.

During the counting, until and unless there is a winner, nothing of the counting is reported or stated except that if there is no winner the game will move to the Secondary phase. Admirals and Captains are still not allowed to see their opponent’s board or to obtain any information and a Captain is not allowed to assist his Admiral.

It is restated that it is not necessary to have one’s own Flagship afloat in order to win the Battle.

To sum up the requirements for a win at this stage are that an Admiral needs to have been awarded the higher number of Naval-marks and to have sunk his opposing Admiral’s Flagship, or of course to have sunk all his opposing Admiral’s Ships.

 

Secondary phase – repair and re-deployment

When and if the game moves to this stage Ships that are still afloat but damaged are fully repaired and no longer have any damaged sections. These repaired Ships together with Ships that are still afloat and undamaged are then re-deployed by their Admirals to their respective Seas. The following applies:

Land remains positioned the same as in the primary phase and as already stated may not be added to, removed or moved.

Sunken Ships remain sunk and so play no part in the Secondary phase.

All unused Bowman/Anti-aircraft Missiles (including any still on board any surviving Flagship), plates of Armoured shielding etc. are moved to the Great Divide (if not already there) and play no part in the Secondary phase.

Each Navy has one Repeating gun (explained below) allocated to them (at no cost) that is placed on any Land position and is then situated underground.

This second deployment or re-deployment of (the surviving) Ships follows the same rules of Ship deployment as already explained for the Primary phase deployment and when completed each Sea (board) will only have placed on it unoccupied and undamaged Ships and unoccupied Land except for one Repeating gun placed on a Land position from where it cannot be moved. There is no protection from Armoured shielding as this will have all been removed. Any Flagship now only differs from other Ships by its greater size and its (decorative only) Flag.

An Admiral may be assisted by his Captain during this stage.

During this stage it is not allowed for an Admiral or Captain to see their opponent’s board (Sea) or to obtain any information as to their opponent’s activities.

 

A Repeating Gun

is similar to an Underground Gun except that these Guns remain operable for very long and sustained use – sufficient for the remainder of the Battle (game). They are completely safe from damage by the projectiles of another Repeating gun and on each turn they fire three projectiles. Each of these projectiles can damage a Ship’s section and as already stated once all of a Ship’s sections are damaged the Ship sinks. These Guns are made with the utmost precision and are exceedingly rare. The projectiles are stored and fed into the gun from deep underground and do not appear on the board. There are sufficient projectiles for the remainder of the Battle (game).

 

 

Secondary phase – engagement

After both Admirals have completed their re- deployment the game moves to the Secondary engagement stage and each Admiral will take alternate turns in the firing of their Repeating guns to specified opposing positions. During this stage an Admiral is not allowed to be assisted by his Captain and neither an Admiral nor a Captain is allowed to see their opponent’s board (Sea) or to obtain any information other than what is properly reported.

A Secondary phase turn can consist of up to three parts and they are as follows:

Firstly putting into place the effects, as described above (if any) of the three projectiles that have been fired by his opponent on the opponent’s immediately preceding turn.

Reporting as required (explained below).

Firing his own gun’s three projectiles. The Admiral must state specific opposing destination positions for the three projectiles that are fired.

Note that not all three of the above occur on every turn

 

The Secondary phase – engagement stage, and the game, ends immediately when, but not before, all the Ships of one of the Navies are sunk.

As can be seen, the object during the Secondary phase - engagement is to sink all the opponent’s Ships before he sinks all of one’s own Ships.

 

 

Final counting of Naval-marks

At the end of the Secondary phase – engagement stage there is a Final counting of Naval-marks (so as to have a complete record) where the principles of awarding Naval-marks is the same as for the first counting and the Admiral with one or more Ships still afloat wins the Battle – the Admiral with all his Ships sunk will obviously have no Naval-marks. The Naval-marks awarded during the First counting are disregarded and not taken into account for the Final count.

 

 

 

 

Rules - Fourth section

This section sets out the various reporting requirements of the game.

 

There are requirements to state information at various stages of the game and the following lists when and what must be stated or disclosed. There is some leeway with the actual wording but the information stated must meet the substance of the requirements.

 

As already stated an Admiral must state that all his Ships are sunk immediately this happens.

When taking one of the actions listed earlier during the Primary engagement phase an Admiral must state the following:

When dispatching an (undispatched) Eagle/Reconnaissance aircraft an Admiral must state that he is dispatching an Eagle/Reconnaissance aircraft and to the specific position in his opponent’s board that the Eagle/Reconnaissance aircraft is being dispatched to. He does not have to state the position the Eagle/Reconnaissance aircraft is dispatched from.

When an Admiral shoots down an Eagle/Reconnaissance aircraft with an (armed) Bowman/Anti-aircraft Missile he must state that the Eagle/Reconnaissance aircraft has been shot down by a Bowman/Anti-aircraft missile. He does not have to state the position the Bowman/Anti-aircraft Missile is occupying.

When firing an (operable) Giant gun/Giant missile an Admiral must state that he is firing a Giant gun/Giant missile and to the specific position in his opponent’s board that the Gun’s projectile or the Giant missile is being fired to. He does not have to state the position the Giant gun is occupying or the Giant missile is fired from.

When dispatching an (undispatched) Bomber aircraft an Admiral must state that he is dispatching a Bomber and to the specific position in his opponent’s board that the Bomber is being dispatched to, this being where the Heavy bomb falls. He does not have to state the position the Bomber is dispatched from.

When firing an (operable) Large gun an Admiral must state that he is firing a Large gun and to the specific position in his opponent’s board that the Gun’s projectile is being fired to. He does not have to state the position the Large gun is occupying.

When firing an (operable) Standard gun an Admiral must state that he is firing a Standard gun and to the specific one or two positions in his opponent’s board that the Gun’s one or two projectiles are being fired to. He does not have to state the position the Standard gun is occupying.

When firing an (operable) Underground gun an Admiral must state that he is firing an Underground gun and to the specific one, two or three positions in his opponent’s board that the Gun’s one, two or three projectiles are being fired to. He does not have to state the position the Underground gun is occupying.

When moving a Flagship an Admiral must state that he is moving (or changing the anchorage of) his Flagship. He does not have to state either of the from or to positions.

 

During the Secondary engagement phase an Admiral must state the following for the action he takes:

When firing his Repeating gun an Admiral must state that he is firing his Repeating gun and to the specific three positions in his opponent’s board that the Gun’s three projectiles are being fired to. He does not have to state the position the Repeating gun is occupying.

 

Immediately following an action by his opponent (in either phase) an Admiral must put into place the effects (if any) of the action and he or an opposing Observer must report to the opposing Admiral as follows:

If an (operable) Gun’s projectile or projectiles have been fired or a Giant missile fired or a Heavy bomb dropped then the Admiral must put into effect the damage as described earlier (e.g. severely damaged Guns or plates of Armoured shielding must be removed from the board, Ship’s sections that are damaged must now be shown as grey in colour, sunken Ships must be removed from the board etc.). The Observer or Admiral then reports this damage (or states that there has been no damage or effects) and basically he must state exactly what has occurred but not the positions where. Specifically he must state the following (if any have occurred):

Note – In the Secondary phase, information regarding Personnel, Armoured shielding etc. will not be required as these are no longer on the board.

Note – Type of position can be Land, Sea or Ship’s section (damaged or undamaged), occupied or unoccupied, protected or unprotected (by Armoured shielding).

 

The number of plates of Armoured Shielding that have been wrecked or severely damaged. He does not have to state the positions that they covered or the type of positions.

The number and denomination of Guns/Giant missiles that have been severely damaged. He does not have to state the positions that they occupied or the type of positions.

The number of Bombers that have been severely damaged. He does not have to state the positions that they occupied or the type of positions.

The number of (undispatched) Eagles/Reconnaissance aircraft that have been wounded or badly wounded or severely damaged. He does not have to state the positions that they occupied or the type of positions.

The number of (armed) Bowmen/Anti-aircraft Missiles that have been wounded or badly wounded or severely damaged. He does not have to state the positions that they occupied or the type of positions.

The number and denomination of Ships that have been sunk. He does not have to state the positions that these Ships occupied or the type of positions, or how much damage, if any, they had previously sustained or how many new “hits” occurred.

The number of undamaged sections now damaged on Ships that are still afloat and what the Ships’ denominations are. This must be stated for each individual Ship that has had damage inflicted on it. The Observer or Admiral does not have to state the positions that these sections occupied or the type of positions, or whether the sections were occupied or unoccupied, or how much damage, if any, their Ships had previously sustained or now have.

 

If an undispatched Eagle/Reconnaissance aircraft has been dispatched and has not been shot down then the Admiral or an Observer allied to the Eagle/Reconnaissance aircraft must report to the Eagle’s/Reconnaissance aircraft’s Admiral the full and exact dispositions on the stated destination position and on the eight adjacent positions. Specifically he must state the following for each of the nine positions:

The designation (location) of the position and whether Land, Sea, or a damaged or undamaged Ship’s section and the denomination of Ship - he does not have to state the particular section of the Ship the section is (e.g. centre section of the Flagship or end section of a Battleship).

Whether or not the position is occupied and if so exactly who or what is the occupant. The description of the occupant must be full e.g. a Gun described as Large or Standard etc. and, if relevant, the number of projectiles still unfired.

Whether or not the position is protected by a plate of Armoured shielding. He does not have to state the position in its array the plate is.

 

 

 

 

Rules - Fifth section

This section contains scoring and various other rules

 

Scoring:

Although the number of Naval-marks awarded to each Admiral is crucial in deciding who the winner of the game is, the actual Game Points scored by the winner do not depend on how many Naval-marks are awarded to the winner or the margin of the win.

The winning Admiral scores as follows:

For a Primary phase win the Satellite Game Points score is 4-0 to the winning Admiral.

For a Secondary phase win the Satellite Game Points score is 2-0 to the winning Admiral.

Any Game points shared in by a winning Captain is a matter for agreement between him and his Admiral.

 

Observers:

The following is a list of all that Observers may do during the game:

An allied Observer may relay to the opposing Admiral statements on actions taken by his own Admiral.

An allied Observer may relay and report to his Admiral the full and exact dispositions seen by their dispatched Eagles/Reconnaissance aircraft.

An allied Observer may put into place the effects and damage (if any) resulting from the immediately preceding turn of the opposing Admiral. An opposing Observer may then report the effects and damage (or state there were none) to his own Admiral.

An allied Observer may rescue any badly wounded or wounded Personnel from Sea, Land or Ships including downed Eagles and move them to the Great Divide.

An allied Observer may move any Personnel to the Great Divide where required as described.

An allied Observer may remove sunken Ships from the board or remove Ordnance or Aircraft. from the board (or move to the Great Divide) where required as described.

Observers may assist in the countings of Naval-marks.

Observers may fully record a game and if not, any Arbiter or Referee may do so.

 

General rules & notes:

Boards can be very large and Ships and other items should be realistic and are 3D. There can be suitable audio effects, for example the sounds of Guns firing.

All wounded and badly wounded Personnel including downed Eagles make a full recovery.

Aircraft are manned and these Personnel also make a full recovery if wounded or badly wounded.

If preferred Giant guns instead of Giant missiles can also be used for the Modern variations as there is no practical difference between them and the Guns can be visualised in different ways for the variations.

 

Clocks are called Composite Countdown clocks and an example of their working is:

Primary phase – spending and deployment. A single clock will have say 90 minutes entered on it that will count down to zero and if an Admiral has not then completed his spending and deployment he will be allowed no more of such, though he does not lose the game on time . Any unused time on this clock is not carried forward.

Primary phase – engagement. Both Admirals now have a clock each and have say 90 minutes entered on each of them. These clocks will count down and if a clock reaches zero then that Admiral can take no further actions himself for this stage, though he does not lose the game on time.

First counting of Naval-marks. This should be completed within a reasonable time without the need to use a clock. It is allowed though to re-set the single clock with say 30 minutes entered on it as this counting should not be rushed. Any unused time on this clock is not carried forward.

Secondary phase – repair and re-deployment. The single clock is re-set with say 30 minutes entered on it that will count down to zero and if an Admiral has not then completed his re- deployment he will be allowed no more of such, though he does not lose the game on time . Any unused time on this clock is not carried forward.

Secondary phase – engagement. The individual clocks of each Admiral have say 30 minutes entered on each of them plus any unused time from the Primary phase – engagement stage. These clocks will count down and if a clock reaches zero then that Admiral can take no further actions and loses the game on time.

Final counting of Naval-marks. This should be completed within a short time without the need to use a clock. It is allowed though to re-set the single clock with say 15 minutes entered on it as there should be no rush to complete this.

Suitable amounts of time lagging should be set where appropriate to allow for such things as physical movements when removing sunken Ships from the board etc.

Note that Independent single countdown clocks as described in Steps along the Way of Chess are set for any meaningful game of Flagship.

 

Other rules and notes

It is allowed for each Admiral to have an additional board to plot such information as he properly obtains concerning his opponent’s dispositions.

Before a game commences Admirals must roll a standard dice or coin to decide who takes the first turn in Primary engagement, or they can decide this by way of card. The winner of this takes the first turn and it is not allowed for this Admiral to state “No action” on his first turn. If there is a Secondary phase then the Admiral who moved second in Primary engagement takes the first turn in Secondary engagement.

There is nothing to prevent an Admiral from repeatedly firing to the same position(s) inadvertently.

Note that an appointed Captain is Captain of the relevant Flagship and is master of this, his own Ship, and although the decision to change the anchorage of a Flagship is that of an Admiral, the actual move itself.....(or not, if the Captain so decides – in this case another action is taken or no action is taken as decided by the Admiral).....is decided by the Captain and not the Admiral; this is if a Captain has been appointed (there usually should be); the Admiral states the fact of any change of the Flagship’s anchorage though.

It is not necessary to appoint a Captain or to request his assistance if there is one, however, as stated it is preferable to have a Captain appointed. Should a Captain at any stage see the opposing board or obtain information he should not have, then he should not assist or consult any more with his Admiral.

The deployment and purchase table at the end summarises what can and cannot be purchased under each variation and where they can or cannot be deployed and the unit cost is also given.

 

 

 

Notes

 

 

Examples of modern Flagships

The following three Seaships are designated as being of Emerald class (Highest) and of Flagship calibre (Highest)

Note that the following specifications are approximate only (see Further thoughts - various), and that all weights and measures are Imperial.

 

 

The Seaship FS Voelf/2

There is only one such Seaship and he is numbered EMFLBK/MK2-01.01

Standard displacement 60,000 (revised 80,000) tons

Full load displacement 70,000 (revised 95,000) tons

(revised and new - Full load displacement with optional reserve supplies 100,000 tons)

All shafts propulsion – Diesel motors, for extended cruising range (revised as outer geared turbines & inner diesel motors)

Maindeck (revised as thick Maindeck) and upperdeck armour

Thick waterline armour belt

Main armament of 16 (revised 18) inch guns

Shell weight 2,000 (revised 3,000) lbs

Sea cruise missile tubes 21 (revised 27) inch

Dual range/speed sea cruise missiles with gyroscope

Aircraft with catapult(s)

Radar capability

Maximum speed of 30 (revised 34) knots

Length 900 (revised 1,000) feet

Width 120 (revised 140) feet

Draught 36 (revised 38) feet

 

 

The Seaship FS Taeger/2

There is only one such Seaship and he is numbered EMFLTI/MK2-01.01

Standard displacement 85,000 (revised 120,000) tons

Full load displacement 100,000 (revised 140,000) tons

(revised and new - Full load displacement with optional reserve supplies 150,000 tons)

Outer shafts propulsion – Geared turbines, for sporadic use as boosters

Inner shafts propulsion – Diesel motors, for extended cruising range

Thick main deck armour

Also upperdeck armour

Thick waterline armour belt

Main armament of 18 (revised 20) inch Guns

Shell weight 3,000 (revised 4,000) lbs

Submerged sea cruise missile tubes 21 (revised 27) inch

Dual range/speed sea cruise missiles with gyroscope

Aircraft with catapult(s)

Radar capability

Maximum speed of 32 knots

Length 1,000 (revised 1,100) feet

Width 140 (revised 170) feet

Draught 38 (revised 42) feet

 

 

The Seaship FS Baer/2

There is only one such Seaship and he is numbered EMFLSC/MK2-01.01

Standard displacement 130,000 (revised 170,000) tons

Full load displacement 150,000 (revised 200,000) tons

(revised and new - Full load displacement with optional reserve supplies 220,000 tons)

Outer shafts propulsion – Diesel motors for extended cruising range

Inner shafts propulsion – Geared turbines for sporadic use as boosters

Thick main deck armour

Also upperdeck armour

Thick waterline armour belt

Main armament of 20 (revised 22) inch Guns

Shell weight 4,000 (revised 5,000) lbs

Submerged sea cruise missile tubes 21 (revised 27) inch

Dual range/speed sea cruise missiles with gyroscope

Aircraft with catapult(s)

Radar capability

Maximum speed of 30 knots

Length 1,100 (revised 1,200) feet

Width 170 (revised 210) feet

Draught 42 (revised 48) feet

 

 

A Summary Table is given below but see Further thoughts - various, regarding revised figures, and below for an additional table of these

 

https://www.chessvariants.com/membergraphics/MSstepping-stones-of-chess/fl111.jpg

Note that the Propulsion specifications are as stated, though they all differ

 

 

 

And a Summary Table is given below with initial revised figures

 

 

 

Note that the Propulsion specifications are as stated, though they differ

 

 

Note 1

Unique identifiers are a set of letters and numbers etc. whereby:

Firstly a description that applies to whatever is to be identified is given and in the above this is a Seaship

Secondly a delineator is given after this is finished and in the above this is –

Thirdly a set of letters etc. are given that are unique within the description firstly given and in the above are EMFLBK/MK2 and EMFLTI/MK2 and EMFLSC/MK2 and these can carry a meaning as these in fact do so as EM stands for Emerald class and then FL stands for Flagship calibre and / followed by MK2 denotes these Seaships are the mark two or second and improved versions of the first versions of these Seaships; much of this improvement being the use of a material called XT-7 or a material(s) based on this and this increases the effectiveness of these Seaships’ armour to a considerable and significant degree (and is much thicker in parts – see Note 2), also anti aircraft defences and their guidance systems are greatly improved

Fourthly a delineator is given after this is finished and in the above this is –

Fifthly the ordinal number of the relevant series of whatever is to be identified is given and in the above is 01

Sixthly the ordinal number is delineated when finished and in the above this is.

Seventhly the number of such that are otherwise identical to that that is to be identified is given and in the above is 01

Note that spaces are not allowed and that case sensitivity applies.

 

Note 2

Although the thickness of armour is much increased (mostly by a foot) by the use of improved materials - see Note 1, these materials do not increase weight since they are lighter than those of the MK1s, but they are much stronger overall in the requirements of the Ships’ protection.

 

Note 3

No personnel have so far been appointed for any of these Ships and there will be no appointments whatsoever without the most exhaustive of examinations.

 

 

A Painting of an Emerald class and Flagship calibre Seaship (flag not shown)

 

https://www.chessvariants.com/membergraphics/MSstepping-stones-of-chess/f005.png

 

 

 

 

An example of a Giant Gun

Weight 1,500 tons

Powered by Sub-marine Diesel engines

Hull front Armour 10 inches

Main Armament – Rifled 30 inches Gun x 1

Barrel movement by elevation

High explosive and Armour piercing Shells

Shell weight = 7 tons

Speed 10 mph

Overall length 140 feet

Width 25 feet

Height 60 feet

 

 

A Painting of a Giant Gun (in fixed position)

 

https://www.chessvariants.com/membergraphics/MSstepping-stones-of-chess/f006.png

 

 

 

Note also that for these Seaships and Giant guns there will be built, it is hoped, at the most pains-taking efforts, one-twentieth scale remote controlled models, and that these models will be visually accurate in every respect, and that many of the constituent parts will indeed function as does the actual Seaship itself, and some very advanced technology with regard to the Ships’ aircraft, it is hoped, will enable their realistic flight. At some stage there will be, hopefully, a commercial manufacture of smaller models.

 

 

 

https://www.chessvariants.com/membergraphics/MSstepping-stones-of-chess/f007.jpg

 

 

 

Information Table

 

https://www.chessvariants.com/membergraphics/MSstepping-stones-of-chess/f002.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

Further thoughts

 

Introduction

Games and things are not necessarily fixed in terms of rules, names or appearances and so forth - there can be improvements or corrections or new variations and many other things major and minor, and practical playing experience could suggest changes.....the following lists some current thoughts along these lines but they are possibilities only and not definite in any way and this section could be updated and change at any time as could any other items:

 

Name changes etc.

In Blade the format name of Duplicate could be changed to Corresponding.

In Revolver the Central Reserve could be called the Treasury or the Bank.

In Revolver the name of the Reservist could be the Treasurer or the Bursar.

In Revolver the hand name of Match may be changed - perhaps to a Pair.

In Revolver the name of the Fourth Shot, being the Community Bullet, could be the Auction if preferred.

The names of the Kingdoms in Flagship may be changed.

The words/phrase 'The Diamond Set™' or 'The Diamond Set' (not necessarily as a trademark and 'A' can replace 'The' here) may be used in some way (diamonds are, as is well known, one of the suits of a current standard pack of cards) and they are reserved for use by the Author.

 

Various

In Revolver the Statistical ranking of the Gun-hands shown below is based on the frequency of them appearing and without replacement of any Bullet. Some of the frequencies differ little or very little and a re-calculation may be required to ensure they are correct. A listing of the frequencies (as possible hands) for all of the hands is as follows:

Foremost Bridge - 1 

Primary River - 4 

Bridge - 12 

River - 36 

Crossing - 2496 

Stream - 2520 

Stepping-stones - 2808 

Gathering - 2820 

Match - 82368 

Fling - 177660 

Total  - 270725

The above listing does not however take into account the possibilities and probabilities (chances) of improvement to a hand by a player obtaining the Community Bullet and a knowledge of these chances could be of considerable benefit to a player.....also it should, I think, be said that whereas the probability of being dealt a rank of hand is known and that the cost to be dealt a hand is known, and in addition the chances of various and/or overall improvements to a hand by means of the Community Bullet can be determined and known, the cost of improvements is not so readily determined as a player must, after paying to reach there, win the Auction if he is to improve his hand (or perhaps to prevent others from doing so), and the costs of this vary as reaching and then bidding in the Auction does not have a fixed limit and unless he has more stakes (Bullet-marks) available than other players he cannot guarantee winning, though he may still do so depending on the bidding and, if he does win, he then has less stakes available to continue the round with. Also since winning Auction bids are only returned if the bidder wins the round, the cost of improvement means the holder of an improved hand has effectively placed stakes that are higher than other players - see rules on 'Shots'.

As an example: a player dealt two Marshalls may consider he has a reasonable chance of winning the round and so may pay to continue to the Auction where he may decide to bid strongly, if necessary, to improve his own hand - if this is possible as it depends on his exact Bullets and what the Community Bullet is, or he may decide to bid strongly, if necessary, to prevent any others from improving their hand (other players may also be bidding to prevent improvements by their opponents as well as to improve their own hands, or they could be bluffing); then a) if he cannot stay with the Auction bidding but wins the round then he would win the amount bid by the winner in the Auction in addition to other stakes placed - perhaps a bonus round or b) if he wins the Auction and goes on to win the round then his Auction costs are returned and he also wins other stakes placed or c) if he cannot stay with the Auction bidding and loses the round he will lose his stakes placed or d) if he wins the Auction but loses the round he loses his Auction bid as well as his stakes placed - perhaps a costly round. The assumption has been made that the player has sufficient stakes to continue to the Showdown.

It should be added that the Auction gives scope for bluffing, and bluffing is considered an essential part of Poker type games.

 

An alternative ranking of hands is shown below that is more in line with that of ranking of Poker hands (but not entirely) and so can be called the Traditional ranking – the frequencies are shown and also Poker (or nearest to) equivalents are shown in brackets

 

Foremost Bridge - 1 (All four Aces)

Primary River - 4 (Royal Flush)

Bridge - 12 (Four of a kind)

River - 36 (Straight Flush)

Gathering - 2820 (Flush)

Stream - 2520 (Straight)

Crossing - 2496 (Three of a kind)

Stepping-stones - 2808 (Two pairs)

Match - 82368 (Pair)

Fling - 177660 (High card)

 

The inconsistency here between the frequency and ranking of some hands is perhaps not too much and so this alternative might be be considered as acceptable by some, but I think this must await considered opinion and this ranking is not official until and unless authorised by myself to be so - were it to become so then whether the Statistical or Traditional ranking of hands applied to a game would have to be made known and preferably displayed to players.

 

 

 

Revolver Fallback rules

 

Introduction

In Revolver it is, I think, generally preferable to allow for rules of the type often called in Poker as ‘All in’ and details of these are readily available. When applied to Revolver the rules are as follows and are called the ‘Fallback’ rules and provided they work satisfactorily they are official rules:

The stages of a round are shown below to help with clarity of the rules and two points may be worth mentioning first

Firstly if a player, having had his reserve plus interest issued to him, does not have sufficient stakes (Bullet-marks) to Enter-in for a round, currently five Bullet-marks, then he must Finish for the game (and should leave the table), and

Secondly the Auction and the eligibility of a player to win the Community barrel under these rules are talked of separately.

 

First shot: Enter-in or out

Second shot: the Deal

Third shot: Contest or decline

Third shot ricochet: Match or decline

Fourth shot: the Auction

Fifth shot: Step-up or decline

Fifth shot ricochet: Re-match or decline

Sixth shot: the Showdown

 

Basic rules

The basic situation is that if a player does not have sufficient stakes to continue a round with and has already had his reserve plus interest issued to him (also see General notes and further rules) then he can state Fallback whereby the following takes place

The player, having stated Fallback, places any remaining stakes he has (if any) and he will stay in the round – the placement will be less than the minimum necessary to continue (or the rules are not allowed to then be initiated) and so a raise or a partial raise does not occur at this point and partial raises are not allowed in any case

The placement amount by any player immediately following the Fallback discounts this placement and it could be thought of as being skipped over

If the player does not subsequently win the round he will lose the stakes he has placed on the table and, having none left, he must Finish for the game (and should leave the table) – he will not owe any stakes

If the player subsequently wins the round he collects according to what he placed and so he cannot collect more from any other player than the total amount he himself has placed, but he also cannot collect more from any other player than the total amount they themselves have placed, and this could be less than himself, for example where a player has declined to continue earlier in the round. In these situations other remaining players with remaining stakes will have a secondary winner (as distinct from the primary winner) of them decided amongst themselves, and these stakes can be called the secondary pool or bounty (as distinct from the primary pool or bounty)

These basic rules are where there is only one Fallback player and are discounting the Auction and the Community bullet and barrel - these now follow

 

The Auction and the Community barrel

The Auction – if a player does not have sufficient stakes to make a bid during the Auction he must state No bid; he cannot initiate the Fallback rules during the Auction

The Community barrel - under these rules the (Fallback) player is eligible to win the Community barrel as follows.....

.....If he has won the Auction himself and so paid for the Community bullet, or

.....If, in the Step-up or decline stage, he has placed a minimum of the Step-up amount, currently ten Bullet-marks, or

.....If he has placed at least the same amount in total as the player who won the Auction (discounting the amount paid for winning the Auction)

 

Auction notes

If the player wins the round but is not eligible to win the Community barrel then this is won by the secondary winner – but see below where there is more than one Fallback player

It is possible that an Auction does not take place if all players use these rules or decline before the Auction would take place - also see next note

In connection with the previous note, a player is only eligible to bid in an Auction if he has placed the required stakes to Match for the round and so paid to reach the Auction (this can be called the Part Auction eligibility rule) - Optional rule (this can be called the Full Auction eligibility rule) here he must also stand to lose all his placed stakes at this point in the round (prior to any possible Auction bid) meaning at least one other player has Matched for the round (even were this player later to decline - this would be his choice and he would not have to do so if any player had initiated the Fallback rules before the Auction, also see General notes and further rules) - players must be made aware of what Auction eligibility rule is in effect, and in time it may be that one of the rules becomes standard or that having the option remains as standard.

If a situation occurred where no player could lay proper claim to winning the Community barrel then this would be returned to the winner of the Auction – this is a general rule

 

Where there is more than one Fallback player

Where more than one player initiates these rules matters become somewhat more complex, but the principles are much the same and the following applies

Where the winner is a player who has not initiated the rules then he simply collects all the stakes placed and there should be no problem here

Where the winner is a player who has initiated the rules then amongst the remaining players with remaining stakes there may be another player (or more) who initiated the rules but has placed more than the winner, and in this case if he is the secondary winner he can only collect no more from each remaining player than the amount he now has remaining, or less if any remaining player has less than himself.....this process would continue in like manner (if necessary until there is only one remaining player with stakes) until all the stakes are distributed and these further winners could be called the (first) subsidiary winner, the second subsidiary winner and so on with the bounties called likewise.....the Community barrel is won by the first eligible winner during this process

 

General notes and further rules

Although I have checked through the rules a number of times it would take practical playing experience to ‘iron out’ any mistakes or difficulties, and they may need changing or modifying in the light of this

Players may likely arrange their Barrels and Bullet-marks to facilitate these situations when they occur with regard to the bounties

The issuing of a player’s reserve plus interest is, in the first instance, to be applied to at least meeting the minimum stakes required at hand and this can include a successful Auction bid, but any surplus balance after this is available for possible later use in the round in initiating the Fallback rules.  Also see next note

In connection with the previous note an Optional rule (this can be called the Reserve fallback rule) can be applied where a situation arises that would require a player to place more than all his stakes including if his (unissued) reserve plus interest were issued in order to continue in the round, and so he would have to decline. This situation, perhaps rare, could arise for example if, after the Auction, five players were to raise the stakes after the first player Stepped-up for the round, here there would be sixty Bullet-marks required if any seventh player were to continue and if he could not meet this amount even including his reserve plus interest then under this rule he could request his reserve plus interest be issued and place this together with any other stakes he has remaining (if any) and initiate the Fallback rules (he can state Reserve fallback - note he would still have less than sixty Bullet-marks placed). This rule may become standard, and players must be made aware if this rule is in effect by informing them that the Reserve fallback rule is in effect or is not in effect. It should perhaps be added that with six players or less at a table such a situation may not arise.

Under these rules it is possible that the Showdown is reached before the Re-match or decline stage or earlier, including before the Auction is reached – see Auction notes

The Reservist (named the Treasurer or the Bursar if preferred) and any Referee or Arbiter should be familiar with situations arising under the Fallback rules

 

 

 

In Revolver a Reservist (or Treasurer or Bursar if so called) may organise a day's play themself, but to do this the person would need to be authorised to do so and would need to have proven good experience.

In Revolver the rules on a player choosing to be a Leaver for the game (see the First shot in Revolver) may well be revised with a view to imposing restrictions for this.

Overall maximum and minimum numbers for Revolver may be set.

The assumption in Flagship that if the game is simply described as Flagship then this means the variation is the Modern, Free deployment variation may be changed to the Modern, Restricted deployment variation or possibly one of the Medieval variations - extensive playing of the game would be required to determine the optimum, and so assumed, variation.

In Flagship the specifications for the mark two modern Flagships will need to be revised upwards and some approximate initial revisions are shown in brackets and in an additional summary table - these revisions will be firmed up at some stage. The additional figures shown and called 'Full load displacement with optional reserve supplies' may be more usually called 'Reserve load displacement' for short.....Giant guns will also have revised figures as the size has significantly increased and initial revisions will be shown at some stage.

Though the rules for Blade and Revolver state that clocks are not usually used this may well be changed so that any referee of these games or the reservist in Revolver can decide when to issue a time countdown warning, and here an hourglass could be displayed with an appropriate amount of time on it. Hourglasses are talked of in Steps along the way of Chess in timing of games and a picture of one is shown there.

The story based on the JRR Tolkien books has some puzzles etc. in it and game players sometimes find these things interesting, and the book gives a simple listing of these in the section called 'Ends'.

 

 

Tournament play:

Tournaments are basically where a number of players enter such to play a series of a specific game or variation thereof and at the end of the tournament there are placings according to the results of the entrants.

The playing of tournaments (or drives) in Blade would likely have their own scoring system with likely only the highest placed entrants (perhaps only the top three or four) receiving points over and above those already scored as described, but these additional points (probably to be called Tournament bonus points) could be of a relatively large amount depending on the number and strength of entrants and the number of games played - such tournaments would often last for at least a day. The format and details or a template for these tournaments may, at some point, be written as a separate heading.

 

 

 

 

Listings in order:

 

Base Games

Whist and Contract Bridge

Brag and Poker

Monopoly

Battleships and Naval War Game

 

Lacework Games

Three-handed Blade

Four-handed Blade

Blade - Duplicate playing format

Revolver

Chamber

The Ball-barrel Puzzle

Flagship - Medieval, Restricted deployment variation

Flagship - Medieval, Free deployment variation

Flagship - Modern, Restricted deployment variation

Flagship - Modern, Free deployment variation

 

Further thoughts

Name changes etc.

Various including:

   Revolver Fallback rules

   Reference to other puzzles etc.

   Tournament play

 

 

 

Shaye-Alexander Ellis Nicholls of Rhun, Merridonia

Monday, 8th July 2019

 

E&OE

 

Book finishes



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Web page created: 2016-12-04. Web page last updated: 2016-12-04