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Charles Gilman[Subject Thread] [Add Response]
Christine Bagley-Jones wrote on 2021-02-26 UTC

Heya all, I see Charles Gilman hasn't logged in since 2016, is he still around, still with us. Thanks.


UPDATED! This item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2021-02-23
 By Nemo  Thorx. Pawn Blackhole Chess. (Updated!) Each side is split into two and grouped into corners. Pawns play towards the center.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Nemo Thorx wrote on 2021-02-26 UTC

clarified on the linked page that Adam came up with the core idea and I've refined it.

Adam and myself are appropriate as joint inventors


UPDATED! This item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2021-02-26
 By Jon  Soder. Sting. (Updated!) Missing description[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Fergus Duniho wrote on 2021-02-26 UTC

Noticing that your IMG tag was not closed off, I tried to close it off by adding ">, but when I checked the result, no changes had been made. It looks like the problem is that the PNG binary code you entered directly on the page exceeds the maximum size of the field used in the database. It is a TEXT field, and on looking it up, I learned that its maximum size is 64KB or 65,535 characters. So, it is too long to fit and got cut off. Upload your image as a separate file instead.


MLmightychess[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Fergus Duniho wrote on 2021-02-25 UTC

I am going to delete this page, because we already have a rules page on Mighty Chess, and this website is about other games besides Mighty Chess. If you want a link page to your website, make it about your website, not about one particular game on your website.


This item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 0000-00-00
 By Jessie  Powell. 7x7x7x7 Chesseract. 4-dimensional chess on a 7x7x7x7 Tesseract.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Fergus Duniho wrote on 2021-02-25 UTC

Since you deleted the content you had on this page, does that mean we should go ahead and delete this page?


This item is a miscellaneous item
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2018-08-13
New Submissions for Review. A listing of all submissions still awaiting editorial approval.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Fergus Duniho wrote on 2021-02-25 UTC

I added information on the last action to each submission listing. This will be either the latest comment or the latest revision, and it will give us an indication of which submissions require attention. When the last action was by the author, the last action text will appear green, and this will indicate that some attention is required from the editors. When the last action was not by the author, the last action text will appear red, and this will either mean that someone is working on it, or that we're waiting for some action by the author.


UPDATED! This item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2021-02-26
 By Jon  Soder. Sting. (Updated!) Missing description[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Fergus Duniho wrote on 2021-02-25 UTC

It looks like you posted the content of a PNG file directly to the page. That will not work. You should upload your PNG file to the directory for this page and link to it as a separate file.


UPDATED! This item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2021-02-25
 By Daniel  Zacharias. Knockoff Chess. (Updated!) Chess with pieces that push each other around and off the board.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Daniel Zacharias wrote on 2021-02-25 UTC

right


Fergus Duniho wrote on 2021-02-25 UTC

You mean they are divergent pieces that can push pieces only with their capturing move, not with their non-capturing move. Correct?


Daniel Zacharias wrote on 2021-02-25 UTC

I didn't express that well. I meant that pawns can only push a friendly piece using their normal capturing move. Is it clearer now?


Fergus Duniho wrote on 2021-02-25 UTC

If Pawns can use their capturing ability only to push friendly pieces, then what sense can be made of en passant capture?


UPDATED! This item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2021-02-25
 Author: calebmcc111. Inventor: Samay  Raina. Poison Pawn Chess. (Updated!) Capture the wrong pawn and you lose.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Fergus Duniho wrote on 2021-02-25 UTC

please clarify if you choose one of your pawns to be poisoned, or can you choose one of your opponent's instead?

The video answered this question. Although it's a long video, it covers the rules of the game in the first two minutes.


This item is a piececlopedia entry
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2001-04-06
 Author: Hans L. Bodlaender. Inventor: J. de A. Almay. Boyscout. Moves in a diagonal zigzagline.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Bn Em wrote on 2021-02-25 UTC

The remark was very much an assessment of my impression of Man and Beast rather than an actual suggestion as such.

True, he was rather fond of, sometimes gratuitously, proliferating names, though in his case it kind of makes sense considering they would often turn up in games together and it'd be a bit of a pain to have several kinds of very different ‘rook’ in a game. A matter of degree I suppose really (after all we don't go around calling things wazir‐/ferz‐/manriders (the reuse of those for shogi‐general extrapolations in M&B10 notwithstanding) — and ofc the large shogis are even more extreme, if not nearly as numerous).

Fwiw at least Boyscout is well‐enough established imo that ‘helical boyscout’ wouldn't generate much confusion — but helical bishop doesn't have any other obvious meaning so… they can be synonyms! (now all that's missing is a prefix combining helical and switchback…)


Fergus Duniho wrote on 2021-02-24 UTC

though I expect he'd have called them helical girl‐/boy‐/doublescouts rather than rooks/bishops/queens

He liked to give everything a unique name, which could create a barrier to remembering all the many pieces he named. I want to keep things simple, memorable, and generic, especially when it comes to names to use outside of any variant. I would just use the names of Crooked Rook, Bishop, and Queen for the pieces he gave scout names.


Bn Em wrote on 2021-02-24 UTC

Indeed, I updated my comment once I noticed they weren't the same after all. It seems like the kind of thing he'd've come up with a prefix word (like switchback) for, but I can't find one, and Helical does seem apt (though I expect he'd have called them helical girl‐/boy‐/doublescouts rather than rooks/bishops/queens)


Fergus Duniho wrote on 2021-02-24 UTC

Charles Gilman, rather predictably, is way ahead of us here. The helical Rook, Bishop, and Queen are in M&B09 as respectively Proselyte, Brueghel, and Halcyon.

Here is what he says about those pieces:

Crooked odd-move pieces alternate between destinations on two paths of Bent pieces. Names combine the start of the Straight piece and end of the Bent one, where possible alluding to the latter. Square-cell boards have the PROSELYTE, meaning someone changing religion, is a 90° Crooked Panda switching Anchorite paths and the BRUEGEL or BRUEGHEL, a 90° Crooked Bear switching Angel paths and named after a family of Dutch artists. For Proselyte+Bruegel - a Crooked Harlequin switching Gorgon paths, HALCYON as a synonym for kingfisher conveys a Kinglike combining of orthogonal and diagonal.

The Panda is the Slip Rook, which I called a Shifty Rook. A Crooked Panda would make criss-crossing Dabbabbah leaps across a diagonal axis. The Crooked Bear would make criss-crossing Alfil leaps across an orthogonal axis. In contrast to these, the Helical Rook makes a series of criss-crossing Wazir moves, and the Helical Bishop makes a series of criss-crossing Ferz moves. So, I don't think these are the same pieces.


Bn Em wrote on 2021-02-24 UTC

Charles Gilman, rather predictably, is way ahead of us here. The helical Rook, Bishop, and Queen are in M&B09 as respectively Proselyte, Brueghel, and Halcyon. The slip‐ pieces you described in your other comment are the non‐crooked forms of these, respectively the Panda, Bear, and Harlequin (in M&B06 — naturally ‐06 has names for the ski‐sliders too: Picket (after Tamerlane), Pocket, and Fagin)

Edit: just realised you said up to two steps between turns; that may well be new, albeit closely related to the M&B09 pieces


This item is an article on pieces
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2020-04-23
 By Ralph  Betza. Bent Riders. A discussion of pieces, like the Gryphon, that take a step then move as riders.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
H. G. Muller wrote on 2021-02-24 UTC

Ski-sliders are another example. The Ski-Bishop starts like Alfil, and then continues as Ferz-rider (= Bishop) in the same direction.


Greg Strong wrote on 2021-02-24 UTC

Yes, the Seeping Switchers army uses this idea. The rook you describe is called the Slip Rook there.


Fergus Duniho wrote on 2021-02-24 UTC

Last night I was thinking of bent riders that are not bent in the sense of changing direction. I suppose they are among the 25 possibilities Betza mentions, but I don't think he elaborated on them. One piece I was thinking of would initially move as a Wazir, then if it continues, continue as a Dabbabbah-Rider. Unlike the Dabbabbah-Rider, this would not be color-bound. Another one would initially move as a Ferz, then if it continues, continue as an Alfil-Rider. Unlike the Alfil-Rider, this would be able to reach every space of the same color instead of just half of them. I was thinking I might call these the Shifty Rook and the Shifty Bishop and their compound the Shifty Queen. Has anyone used these pieces before?


This item is a piececlopedia entry
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2001-04-06
 Author: Hans L. Bodlaender. Inventor: J. de A. Almay. Boyscout. Moves in a diagonal zigzagline.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Fergus Duniho wrote on 2021-02-24 UTC

It occurred to me last night that the movement pattern of this piece resembles a double helix, though it is not exactly that. This led me to think of pieces whose movement pattern actually does form a double helix. The diagonal form would go one space diagonally, then if it continued, turn 90 degrees and move up to two spaces in that direction, and if it continued, it would turn back to the other direction and move up to two spaces in that direction, and so on, alternating between the two diagonal directions that move it away from its origin along a particular orthogonal axis. Each movement path would be a single helix that keeps going back and forth across the same axis, and since a piece would normally have two helical paths around the same axis, this would be a double helix, as in the structure of DNA. Because it would need room on each side of its axis to complete its move, it would be weaker than the Crooked Bishop on the sides of the board. Has this already been invented? If not, Helical Bishop would be a fitting name.

There would also be a Helical Rook. This would move in an orthogonal direction, and if it continues, turn 90 degrees and move up to two spaces, then if it continues, turn back to the other direction and move up to two spaces, and so on, always criss-crossing the same diagonal axis in a helical manner. Like the Helical Bishop it would need room on each side to complete its move and so would be weaker on the sides than the Crooked Rook.

The Helical Queen, of course, would be a compound of these two pieces.


UPDATED! This item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2021-02-24
 By Patrik  Hedman. Generals' Chess. (Updated!) Missing description (9x9, Cells: 81) [All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
H. G. Muller wrote on 2021-02-24 UTC

Oh, sorry, I missed that.


This item is an unknown type!
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2003-01-05
 By Fergus  Duniho. Game Courier. PHP script for playing Chess variants online.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Jamison Painter wrote on 2021-02-24 UTC

Sorry about my first move. It was illegal. I didn't count right! We are playing where a piece has to move the full amount of alloted squares, although most pieces can do so in any direction or combination.


UPDATED! This item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2021-02-24
 By Patrik  Hedman. Generals' Chess. (Updated!) Missing description (9x9, Cells: 81) [All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Fergus Duniho wrote on 2021-02-24 UTC

The Blacksmith occurs in Chu Shogi as Horizontal Mover.

I found the Side Mover in Chu Shogi described as sRvW, but the Blacksmith in this game is a divergent pieces that moves like this only when not capturing. It captures as a Ferz.


Greg Strong wrote on 2021-02-23 UTC

There's also this guy:


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