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This item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2002-06-20
 By Peter  Aronson. White Elephant Chess. Four variants pitting the white Elephant army against black with the normal FIDE array. (8x8, Cells: 64) [All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Christine Bagley-Jones wrote on 2012-01-28 UTCExcellent ★★★★★
never noticed this game before, 4 very nice pieces, congrats.

David Paulowich wrote on 2005-02-24 UTCExcellent ★★★★★

Dr. Peter Nicolaus writes in BURMESE TRADITIONAL CHESS:

'The Myin moves as the modern knight. The Sin moves one square at a time either diagonally or forward. It seems that Myin and Sin are of equal value. Nevertheless Burmese players appear somewhat reluctant to exchange a Myin against a Sin.'

Roger Hare writes on his Chu Shogi page: 'The old texts say that a kinsho and osho against a bare osho wins.' I assume this means that a King and Silver General can force a 'stalemate position' and then capture the enemy King after it moves. In White Elephant Chess it would seem that a lone Black King on the first rank can achieve a stalemate draw against these two pieces. [EDIT] Kinsho = Gold General in Shogi. I suspect that it is not possible to force stalemate with King and Ginsho = Silver General against a lone King.


Charles Gilman wrote on 2003-03-21 UTCGood ★★★★
Your point on avoiding colourbinding is a good one. Presumably even a full bishop would be made significantly more powerful by adding a single forward orthogonal move.

gnohmon wrote on 2002-06-23 UTCExcellent ★★★★★
You have everything but pink elephants! (And is there not a Drunken
Elephant in one of the Oriental variants?)

I like the way you start with the simple theme of the five-limbed elephant
and extend on the idea to develop bunches and bunches of new pieces and
armies.

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