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One dimensional Chess Variants. A page detailing some one dimensional chess variants.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
(zzo38) A. Black wrote on 2010-08-26 UTC
That is an idea. Make a variant mapping 2D to 1D but remove and ignore the separators. And then change other rules if needed, including board setup, if that would improve the game.

Daniil Frolov wrote on 2010-08-26 UTC
'knight must
jump over at least one separator when moving' - it's not only separator limitation of FIDE chess on 1D board. Knight must jump over exactly 1 sparator to leap 10 squares and over exactly 2 to leap 17 squares. Bishop is (9) and (7) rider, but with each of it's leaps it must jump over exactly 1 separator. Rook can't cross separators when moves as rook, but it can move freely as (8) rider.
And here are rules for new game: what if separators are ignored?! :D

George Duke wrote on 2010-07-21 UTC
In the comment Black points out 2-D maps to 1-D, 3-D to 2-D, by  separators,
 http://www.chessvariants.org/index/displaycomment.php?commentid=25177.

Charles Gilman wrote on 2010-03-04 UTC
Now that I've had more time, I've found it. It's EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEX! Chess.

Charles Gilman wrote on 2010-03-04 UTC
This was done once, although offhand I can remember neither the name nor the inventor.

(zzo38) A. Black wrote on 2010-03-04 UTC
Of course, another one dimensional chess is simply the mapping from the 2D board of FIDE chess to a 1D board. You need to add separators and a rule that a knight must jump over at least one separator when moving.

George Duke wrote on 2010-03-03 UTC
One-dimensionals are here, or linked, or in comment.

George Duke wrote on 2009-03-04 UTCExcellent ★★★★★
Also 1-D are Mono-dimensional Chess by Luiz Carlos Campos, who developed Ramayana to be continued, and String Chess by Aaron Hall.

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