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This item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2018-10-28
 By Fergus  Duniho. Wormhole Chess. When a piece leaves a square, it `folds' together. (8x8, Cells: 64) [All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
erik wrote on 2018-10-28 UTC

Thanks for the clarification about Pawn promotion.


Fergus Duniho wrote on 2018-10-28 UTC

As I've programmed the game for Zillions-of-Games, promotion is possible only when a Pawn reaches the last rank by capturing a piece.


erik wrote on 2018-10-28 UTCExcellent ★★★★★

I don't find any information about Pawn promotion in Wormhole Chess. Do Pawns promote on the last square they can reach, whatever the rank (for example if there are no squares anymore vertically in front of the Pawn, beyond the wormhole, nor diagonally where an opponent's piece could land)? Or do they only on the last rank, meaning that if a Pawn can't reach the 8th rank anymore, because of the disappearing of squares, he can't promote anymore?

This comment gives me the opportunity to rate this game as 'excellent'. Really great concept and gameplay. It would be great to have a larger variant of Wormhole Chess, 10x10 or even 12x12.


Kevin Pacey wrote on 2018-03-01 UTCExcellent ★★★★★

Another cool concept for a variant from Fergus.


Julian wrote on 2015-05-16 UTCExcellent ★★★★★
I wish that there was a "Leaper Chess" with this board layout and pieces, but without the wormholes. That could be interesting.

David Paulowich wrote on 2008-09-20 UTC

The previous comment raises an interesting point, and I have copied it into this thread.


kuyan judith wrote on 2008-04-05 UTC
A game where it matters in what order the components of leaping moves happen, without having any lameness to the leapers.

Fergus Duniho wrote on 2007-02-21 UTC
The Champion generally has greater mobility, but the Lion has greater capturing power, and in some situations, especially as the board shrinks, this can give it greater mobility too. So I would say that the Lion is more powerful than the Champion.

Andy wrote on 2007-02-21 UTCExcellent ★★★★★
Wormhole Chess is great variant -- simple concept yields deep new strategy. Much much better game than most games posted here now that are exercises in using as many awkward different pieces on as many awkward different boards as possible. I rate murray lion slightly stronger than champion, wizard, which are about equal and slightly stronger than knight.

Andy Maxson wrote on 2007-02-21 UTCGood ★★★★
What I meant was isn't your rook substitute as strong as your queen substitute?

Fergus Duniho wrote on 2007-02-21 UTC
If the game had Queens and Rooks, which it does not, the Queens would be stronger than the Rooks, because they could move diagonally in addition to moving as Rooks.

Andy Maxson wrote on 2007-02-21 UTCAverage ★★★
This game looks interesting but isnt the queen as strong as the rooks?

Joe Joyce wrote on 2006-03-18 UTCExcellent ★★★★★
Nice idea very nicely done. Fine piece choices. Have to rate it excellent.

Fergus Duniho wrote on 2006-03-14 UTC
You're right. The King can move to c3. I don't know how I missed this. I have now updated the example.

Chuck wrote on 2006-03-14 UTC
I'm still not following you. The white king sits on e1. If it moves in the direction of d2 (which is a void), without changing direction, it ends up on c3, right? The king doesn't have to change it's initial direction--it moves to the upper left from the start, and ends up on c3 without changing direction. c3 is not under attack from a black piece, unless I'm missing something, so it's not checkmate as far as I can tell.

Jeremy Good wrote on 2006-02-27 UTCExcellent ★★★★★
Chuck, pieces can't change their initial direction when in voids. They must land on the opposite side in the same direction as they entered the voids and that is why the white king can't move to c3. Wormhole Chess is an ingenious game, but the most difficult thing is forcing yourself to think of pieces as only taking one specific route to an end square. For example, one has to think of the knight as always travelling one orthogonal plus one diagonal.

Chuck wrote on 2002-06-28 UTC
Is the position in the diagram shown really checkmate? Can't the white king escape the check with Kc3, or am I missing something?

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