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This item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2012-03-20
 Author: Jean-Louis  Cazaux and Hans L. Bodlaender. Inventor: Edgar Rice Burroughs. Jetan. Large variant from the book The Chessmen of Mars. (10x10, Cells: 100) [All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
H. G. Muller wrote on 2017-08-03 UTC

Hmm, the HTML <div> element with the floating format doesn't look such a good idea in a comment posting as it is in an actual article with a lot of text.

Also, when two diagrams are on the same web page, they interfere with each other. The Metamachy diagram is now not processed at all, and only its (reformatted) description is shown. And the Jetan diagram fails to display the pieces. When you click the 'View' links to see the postings in isolation, the diagram displays OK.

This will be hard to fix. Both the diagrams have the same id="diagram", which the JavaScript uses to acces the description and generate the result, but accessing an element by id only accesses the first one of that id. I don't know if it is even possible to ask it to do smething with the second element with the same id. If it is, it should be possible to at least have the script construct the static start image of all diagrams.

BTW, the bright square colors of the Jetan diagram make it rather difficult to recognize the highlighting of the piece moves, however. It is possible to add a specification  startShade=#...... to have an alternative for the darkShade that is used before the diagram is clicked. That way the diagram can be bright when seen as a static picture, but reverts to less dominant colors as soon as you start to display piece moves. No such alternative for the lightShade, however. Because I assumed it would always be pale enough by itself.