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This item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2003-07-03
 Author: L. U. Kisljuk. Hiashatar This item is a game information page
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2003-07-03
 Author: L. U. Kisljuk.. Mongolian Great Chess played on a 10x10 board with a pair of Bodyguard pieces per side.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Ed wrote on 2012-03-28 UTC
@Mats: The sources I consulted are most probably still in copyright, but, even if not and if I still had access to them, maybe not in the public domain. I may find isolated examples of similar images, at least to illustrate what I mean. The other feature of the diagrams, the monochromatic board, requires no example. I doubt that the images of the initial shatar and hiashatar arrays from Okano's book that appear on the internet could be used without his permission. They differ, too, in this way, from the diagrams that I observed in shatar problem literature: WQ and P look like larger and smaller versions of sprinting spotted panthers, BQ and P like a large, lean lion (or dog) and similarly shaped young, also extended as if on the run. B looked, of course like a camel, darkened on one side, lighter for the other. N looked like a horse, and R like a cart. Both B and N were not depicted so as to suggest movement. All the pieces, apart from the pagoda/palace shaped piece that represented K, were presented in profile; White's pieces faced left, as I remember, and Black's faced right.