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Comments by Roberto Lavieri

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The Travelers. Missing description (9x9, Cells: 81) [All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Roberto Lavieri wrote on 2010-03-28 UTC
There is a nice implementation of this game and you can download it from this site, but you need to have zillions of games installed on your computer. the zrf plays very decently, I can even say it is moderately strong. The program implementation was not easy, Antoine Fourriere and Larry L. Smith helped me with parts of the code and after the first release I improved the game play of the program with some elaborated tricks. If you have ZOG, try The Travelers, it is a deep, refreshing and magic game. Perhaps it´s not exactly a Chess variant, but at least it´s very close to be.

Roberto Lavieri wrote on 2010-03-28 UTC
Yes, blockers are invisible (and only) for capturing purposes

Roberto Lavieri wrote on 2010-03-15 UTC
No, a Displacer can´t displace more than one piece a turn

[Subject Thread] [Add Response]
Roberto Lavieri wrote on 2008-07-09 UTC
Chessboxing
The basic idea in chessboxing is to combine the #1 thinking sport and the
#1 fighting sport into a hybrid that demands the most of its competitors –
both mentally and physically.

This is becoming a very popular chess variant aroud the world, but I must
admit it is a rare variant. In a chessboxing fight two opponents play
alternating rounds of chess and boxing. The contest starts with a round of
chess, followed by a boxing round, followed by another round of chess and
so on. 
A contest consists of 11 rounds, 6 rounds of chess, 5 rounds of boxing. A
round of chess takes 4 minutes. Each competitor has 12 minutes on the
chess timer.
A round of boxing takes 3 minutes. Between the rounds there is a 1 minute
pause, during which competitors change their gear. The contest is decided
by: checkmate (chess round), exceeding the time limit (chess round),
retirement of an opponent (chess or boxing round), KO (boxing round), or
referee decision (boxing round). If the chess game ends in a stalement,
the opponent with the higher score in boxing wins. If there is an equal
score, the opponent with the black pieces wins.
There are some iconic chessboxers in conventional chess world, and perhaps
a very good example is the multi-millionary businessman and politic Kirsan
Ilyumzhinov, best known as FIDE president and president of the republic of
kalmykia, in the Russian Federation.

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Roberto Lavieri wrote on 2008-03-29 UTC
Originally published in Science Express on 19 July 2007
Science 14 September 2007:
Vol. 317. no. 5844, pp. 1518 - 1522
DOI: 10.1126/science.1144079
 Prev | Table of Contents | Next  

Research Articles
Checkers Is Solved
Jonathan Schaeffer,* Neil Burch, Yngvi Björnsson, Akihiro Kishimoto,
Martin Müller, Robert Lake, Paul Lu, Steve Sutphen 

The game of checkers has roughly 500 billion billion possible positions (5
x 1020). The task of solving the game, determining the final result in a
game with no mistakes made by either player, is daunting. Since 1989,
almost continuously, dozens of computers have been working on solving
checkers, applying state-of-the-art artificial intelligence techniques to
the proving process. This paper announces that checkers is now solved:
Perfect play by both sides leads to a draw. This is the most challenging
popular game to be solved to date, roughly one million times as complex as
Connect Four. Artificial intelligence technology has been used to generate
strong heuristic-based game-playing programs, such as Deep Blue for chess.
Solving a game takes this to the next level by replacing the heuristics
with perfection. 

Department of Computing Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta
T6G 2E8, Canada. 

 Present address: Department of Computer Science, Reykjavik University,
Reykjavik, Kringlan 1, IS-103, Iceland. 

 Present address: Department of Media Architecture, Future University,
Hakodate, 116-2 Kamedanakano-cho Hakodate Hokkaido, 041-8655, Japan. 


* To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail:
[email protected]

The Travelers. Missing description (9x9, Cells: 81) [All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Roberto Lavieri wrote on 2008-01-17 UTC
Well, I´ve been out of scene for a few months, and it is possible I´m not going to be a very frequent visitor of TCVP for a while. Some serious health problems are the main factor (serious, really, but I´m still alive, and I hope so for a  long time). There are some other factors, including seeking what is going on now in my country, Venezuela. I have wrote a few e-mails (in response to others sent to me by to G.W.Duke), explaining some aspects of my health and also some aspects of Venezuela´s current proccess, and my point of view about it´s balance, the good and the bad things, from my optics (in figurative sense, my vision is far from good, as some of you know). 
I am going to come to this pages once in a while, friends, to see what is happening here. Greetings.

Game Courier Tournament #3. Vote for which games should be in the third Game Courier tournament.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Roberto Lavieri wrote on 2006-09-05 UTCExcellent ★★★★★
I´m afraid I can´t play the Tournament, I can´t be a regular player in the next months. Sorry.

[Subject Thread] [Add Response]
Roberto Lavieri wrote on 2006-09-05 UTC
George, I have deleted the LOG of the game we are playing. Sorry. I´ll
explain you by mail.

ChessVA computer program
. Missing description[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Roberto Lavieri wrote on 2006-08-29 UTCExcellent ★★★★★
Admirable

FischerRandomnew[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Roberto Lavieri wrote on 2006-08-26 UTC
I think there is enough worldwide interest in Chess 960, and not only at very high levels, so a well organized World Championship should be a possible idea, it is only the need of intrepid sponsors and federative initiatives, and I believe there are also good possibilities for it. Pretty horizon for this variant.

Roberto Lavieri wrote on 2006-08-16 UTC
Man-machine Chess960 exhibition: Svidler played yesterday against the computer world champion Spike, and the result was a draw. Radjabov was beated by Shredder.

Roberto Lavieri wrote on 2006-08-16 UTC
It seems to be correct, Svidler-Aronian goes on 17th., today have been played other programmed games of the classic. I´m not sure how legitimate is this Chess960 world championship, but, officially, nobody has expressed a different opinion, and the presence od Svidler as defending champion is a good indicative.

Roberto Lavieri wrote on 2006-08-15 UTC
Mainz, Germany: In a few minutes, the world chess 960 championship will
begin. Also, three other world championships:
1.-Clerical Medical Chess960 World Championship
Peter Svidler of Russia faces Levon Aronian of Armenia in an eight-game
Chess960 (Fischer Random Chess)
2.-Grenkeleasing Rapid World Champioship
World's number two (and rapid chess specialist) Vishy Anand, against
19-year-old Teimour Radjabov of Azerbaijan, number 11 in the world
rankings, in a rapid chess match over eight games.
Aronian vs Svidler in their Chess960 match in Mainz two years ago
3.-Clerical Medical Chess960 World Championship for women, seniors and
juniors
These are eight-game Chess960 (Fischer Random) matches between Elisabeth
Pähtz and Alexandra Kosteniuk (Women); Vastimil Hort and Lajos Portisch
(Seniors) and Pentala Harikrishna and Arkadij Naiditsch (Juniors). Format:
eight rounds

Shako. Cannons and elephants are added in variant on 10 by 10 board. (10x10, Cells: 100) [All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Roberto Lavieri wrote on 2006-08-14 UTCGood ★★★★
I think this games is (perhaps more than FIDE-Chess) very sensitive to openings. You can be quickly in clear disadvantage after some weak opening moves. Some care is needed...

Cannons of Chesstonia ZIP file. Cannons launch a Pawn, Wazir, Ferz and Stone to increase strategical and tactical play.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Roberto Lavieri wrote on 2006-08-05 UTCExcellent ★★★★★
Very good implementation by Antoine. Nice.

Rococo. A clear, aggressive Ultima variant on a 10x10 ring board. (10x10, Cells: 100) (Recognized!)[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Roberto Lavieri wrote on 2006-07-23 UTC
I also consider 'NO' for question number 4, although I differ to you in other answers, as you see. Authors have to clarify.

Roberto Lavieri wrote on 2006-07-23 UTC
Well, I am not an author, but I think the answers are:
1.- No.
2.- No.
3.- Yes.

Ultima. Game where each type of piece has a different capturing ability. (8x8, Cells: 64) (Recognized!)[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Roberto Lavieri wrote on 2006-07-22 UTCExcellent ★★★★★
That's a good idea. We need a new Page, what about 'Ultima Tips'-?. A good theoretical developement may need tons of material; some of us are moderately experienced players, but I�m sure we are not big authorities,and a theory developed by us may be biased, somewhat primitive and far from exhaustive and water-proof. I can do something about it time to time, I suppose that other experienced players here can do something too: Matthew, Antoine, some others and, generally, everybody who visit TCVP can give us something interesting...

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Roberto Lavieri wrote on 2006-07-20 UTC
The last post was mine.

Moderate Progressive Chess. A player may make one more move than his opponent just made. (8x8, Cells: 64) [All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Roberto Lavieri wrote on 2006-07-18 UTCExcellent ★★★★★
Well, I have tried this game briefly. I have to say it seems better than you can figure at first view. I may be influenced because I always rate good or excellent other progresive variants, but I feel this variant more nice to play.

House of Mirrors Chess. Mirrors and reflective pieces add interesting twists to strategy by making pieces appear in 2 or 3 places at the same time. (8x8, Cells: 87) [All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Roberto Lavieri wrote on 2006-07-18 UTCGood ★★★★
Very interesting!. Being me, I would put more mirrors, but it is fine as is now,

Shogi. Missing description (9x9, Cells: 81) (Recognized!)[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Roberto Lavieri wrote on 2006-07-08 UTC
Yes, Mr. Habu is the best Shogi player right now, and he plays Chess 'as hobby'; he has said he has not time to study Chess theory more than the basic things, and he practices Chess very eventually. But he has obtained in the last Tournament his second 'Chess International Master norm'. One more and he is going to be IM, an IM that only plays the game once in a while, without dedication to it. Remarkable, but, undoubtedly, his Shogi experience helps a lot.

The Final Fight Chess ZIP file. Missing description[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Roberto Lavieri wrote on 2006-07-05 UTC
Seeing the description, I was not able to have a clear idea about the pieces and other details in this game.

Italian Progressive Chess. White moves once, black two times, white three times, etc. Check is only allowed at last move of series. (8x8, Cells: 64) [All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Roberto Lavieri wrote on 2006-07-04 UTCGood ★★★★
This game is a classic. It is very difficult to master, due the extreme deepness regardless you can finish a game in very few moves. On purpose of other Italian things, (caugh, caugh), see the sports news.

[Subject Thread] [Add Response]
Roberto Lavieri wrote on 2006-07-03 UTC
The new FIDE Chess ratings. Anand lost almost 30 points, and Topalov rating
grow to 2813!. The boy Magnus Carlsen is now 31th. I mentioned him a few
years ago, when nobody knew about him.

1  Topalov, Veselin  g  BUL  2813  14  1975 
 2  Anand, Viswanathan  g  IND  2779  26  1969 
 3  Aronian, Levon  g  ARM  2761  21  1982 
 4  Kramnik, Vladimir  g  RUS  2743  9  1975 
 5  Svidler, Peter  g  RUS  2742  28  1976 
 6  Leko, Peter  g  HUN  2738  0  1979 
 7  Ivanchuk, Vassily  g  UKR  2734  39  1969 
 8  Adams, Michael  g  ENG  2732  25  1971 
 9  Morozevich, Alexander  g  RUS  2731  18  1977 
 10  Gelfand, Boris  g  ISR  2729  20  1968 
 11  Radjabov, Teimour  g  AZE  2728  20  1987 
 12  Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar  g  AZE  2722  27  1985 
 13  Ponomariov, Ruslan  g  UKR  2721  29  1983 
 14  Navara, David  g  CZE  2719  36  1985 
 15  Shirov, Alexei  g  ESP  2716  43  1972 
 16  Akopian, Vladimir  g  ARM  2713  21  1971 
 17  Polgar, Judit  g  HUN  2710  1  1976 
 18  Grischuk, Alexander  g  RUS  2709  28  1983 
 19  Bacrot, Etienne  g  FRA  2707  32  1983 
 20  Kamsky, Gata  g  USA  2697  29  1974 
 21  Nisipeanu, Liviu-Dieter  g  ROM  2696  36  1976 
 22  Malakhov, Vladimir  g  RUS  2690  23  1980 
 23  Georgiev, Kiril  g  BUL  2685  30  1965 
 24  Bareev, Evgeny  g  RUS  2683  26  1966 
 25  Harikrishna, P.  g  IND  2682  24  1986 
 26  Karjakin, Sergey  g  UKR  2679  22  1990 
 27  Najer, Evgeniy  g  RUS  2677  20  1977 
 28  Short, Nigel D.  g  ENG  2676  11  1965 
 29  Sasikiran, Krishnan  g  IND  2675  31  1981 
 30  Van Wely, Loek  g  NED  2675  38  1972 
 31  Carlsen, Magnus  g  NOR  2675  27  1990

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