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Pocket pieces TT C 30.4.2002 - awards


I received from tourney director Hans Bodlaender only 3 problems. This was very disappointing number, we expected much more entries. I awarded two of them, but I decided not to award the first prize. Both prized problems show some idea specific to the pocket pieces, nevertheless they aren't so complicated as I would like.

2nd Prize: No. 2, Manfred Rittirsch & Franz Pachl, Germany
Black needs exactly 9 moves to reach the position, while white needs 7, it means he has to loose 2 moves. From an interplay between White and Black it is clear, that these tempo moves must be done on 1st and 8th move. Hence there are 2 possibilities - temping by knight or by pocket bishop that is subsequently captured. Knight temping is impossible due to blocked a3, c3 and the presence of bK at g5. It turns out in 1st move white puts pocket bishop on the board and the bishop sacrifices himself on 8th move. Very good reasoning under given fairy condition.

3rd Prize: No. 3, Göran Forslund, Sweden
Author's explanation: a6, f1, e4, d5, e6, f5 and g7 are the only squares from which a nightrider can't reach e5 in (at most) two moves. The first six are already occupied. All white has to do is to put a piece on g7, and black can not put the white nightrider anywhere without facing mate in one...
I can't add too much. Again the idea is based on special pocket pieces property, this time slightly complicated by the fact that both sides have the opposite-side pockets.

This award is now final. It remained open until the end of October 2002. As no reports were received by then, the awards are final. The problems have not been tested by computer. Thanks to authors and to Hans.

Juraj Lörinc, International judge of FIDE for fairy chess, Bratislava, 16.6.2002.
Manfred Rittirsch & Franz Pachl, Germany
2nd Prize Pocket pieces TT C 30.4.2002

1.pBg3! pBc3 2.bxc3 e6 3.Ba3 Bxa3 4.Qc1 Ke7 5.Qb2 Kf6 6.Qb4 Kg5 7.Qf8 Qe7 8.Bd6 Qxd6 9.Qe7+ Sf6.

Black needs exactly 9 moves to reach the position, while white needs 7, it means he has to loose 2 moves. From an interplay between White and Black it is clear, that these tempo moves must be done on 1st and 8th move. Hence there are 2 possibilities - temping by knight or by pocket bishop that is subsequently captured. Knight temping is impossible due to blocked a3, c3 and the presence of bK at g5. It turns out in 1st move white puts pocket bishop on the board and the bishop sacrifices himself on 8th move. Very good reasoning under given fairy condition.









Proof game in 9,0 moves (15+16)
Pocket bishops


Göran Forslund, Sweden
3rd Prize Pocket pieces TT C 30.4.2002

1.pGf3? threat 2.Ge3#, 1...Gxd5!

1.pGg4? threat 2.Gg5#, 1...Gxe6!

1.pGd4? threat 2.Sef4#, 1...Gd6!

1.pGf6? threat 2.Sdf4#, 1...Gd6!

1.pGc3/pGc5/pGc7/pGe3/pGe7/pGg5?
but 1...pNg7!

1.pGg7 zugzwang!
1...Gaf6 2.Sdf4#
1...Gff6 2.Sdf4#
1...Gd4 2.Sef4#
1...pNxy 2.(depends on xy, but always at least one mate)#

Author's explanation: a6, f1, e4, d5, e6, f5 and g7 are the only squares from which a nightrider can't reach e5 in (at most) two moves. The first six are already occupied. All white has to do is to put a piece on g7, and black can not put the white nightrider anywhere without facing mate in one...

I can't add too much. Again the idea is based on special pocket pieces property, this time slightly complicated by the fact that both sides have the opposite-side pockets.









#2 (7+7)
White pocket: bG, Black pocket: wN
1+0 nightrider, 1+2 grasshopper


Comments to Juraj Lörinc.

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Written by Juraj Lorinc; minor changes by Hans Bodlaender.
WWW page created: July 10, 2002. Last modified: January 9, 2003.