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  • Piececlopedia: Chameleon

    Historical notes

    The chameleon was invented by Robert Abbott for his game Ultima . The rules for Ultima were first published in 1962.

    See also another piece also called Chameleon.

    Movement

    The chameleon moves as a chess queen, but does not capture this way, and can never move to an occupied square. When a chameleon captures, it does so by capturing in the manner of piece it is capturing. Chameleons can not capture other chameleons. (In Ultima, a chameleon can not capture an immobilizer, but can immobilize it.)

    Movement diagram

    In the diagram below, the chameleon (represented by the symbol for the bishop, since the game Ultima uses a chess bishop to represent the chameleon) can move to any of the circles marked with a black circle. It can also capture the rook or the bishop.









    Remarks

    A piece can never attack the chameleon without being attacked back, but conversely, the chameleon can never attack another piece without being attacked back also. A king can never move next to an enemy chameleon.

    Note from David Howe: The diagram does not seem right. The black rook is a coordinator, which the white chameleon cannot coordinate with its king. The black bishop is another chameleon, which the white chameleon cannot capture. Ah, now I get it -- they're ortho-chess pieces. Should be using Ultima pieces, otherwise the diagram is misleading.


    This is an item in the Piececlopedia: an overview of different (fairy) chess pieces.
    Written by Benjamin C Good.
    WWW page created: September 14, 1998.
    Modified: D. Howe on March 5, 2000: Chameleon is represented by a bishop, not a knight.
    

    Comments

    This item is a piececlopedia entry,
It belongs to categories: Orthodox chess, 
It was last modified on: 2000-03-05
 Author: Ben  Good. Inventor: Robert  Abbott. Chameleon (1). Take a piece in the way that piece is taking.
    2015-07-20 John Lawson Verified as John LawsonNone

    Any piece that is immobilzed can self-destruct, including the Immobilizer.

    View
    2015-07-17 Guest UnverifiedNone

    If a Chameleon is adjacent to an Immobilizer, does it clone the Immobilizer's ability to self-destruct?

    View
    2010-03-19 NoneThere are many pieces, called 'chameleon', not only two... View
    2008-06-01 Jianying Ji Verified as Jianying JiNone

    please refer to this page for more info on similar pieces. I have found it useful, you might too. http://www.chessvariants.org/piececlopedia.dir/mimics.html

    Unfortunately a mimic that captures as attacker's move is not there, so we need new terminology, we can call it a conter-reflecting mimic

    View
    2008-06-01 Charles Gilman UnverifiedNoneIs there a name for a piece that captures an enemy using the enemy's noncapturing move? Such a piece would avoid the Chameleon's 'How do they capture each other?' problem. View

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    Credits

    Author: Ben Good. Inventor: Robert Abbott.

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    http://www.chessvariants.com/piececlopedia.dir/chameleon.html
    Last Modified: Sun, 01 Apr 2012 20:51:00 -0400
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    Last modified: Sunday, April 1, 2012