The Chess Variant Pages




Quex

QUEX (Queks): King, Queen, Bishops, Knights, and Rooks move and capture the conventional way.

The PRINCE: The Prince starts between the Knight and the Rook. A move could be described thus; One square in any direction, then one square to the left or right. A move can either be along the diagonals, or, along the rank and files.

PAWNS

The Grand pawns are placed in front of the King and Queen. These move and capture as a King. But they can also be captured and promoted.

The Crux pawns start in front of the Rooks. Crux pawns move and capture one square along the rank and file that is forward, backward, or sideways

The Wyse pawns start in front of the Bishops. These move and capture one square diagonally.

The Trez pawns start in front of the Knights. These move and capture one square diagonally forward. They also move and capture one square directly forward

The Fote pawns start in front of the Prince. These only move one square directly forward. They only capture one square diagonally forward.


QUATTRO QUEX: The starting positions of this game are for four players, playing as teams of two. The rules and objective remain the same for doubles, only the array has changed.

The light King and Queen start on the light corner squares. The dark King and Queen start on dark corner squares.

The light King and Queen have a Bishop and Rook to the right, a Knight and Prince to the left. The dark King and Queen have a Knight and Prince to the right, a Bishop and Rook to the left.

The Grand pion starts diagonally in front of the King or Queen. The Crux, Wyse, Trez, & Fote Pawns are arrayed from right to left diagonally for the light pawns, from left to right for the dark pawns.

Trez pawns move in the same direction as the Fote pion, towards their opponent corner square.

Pawns are promoted on reaching one of the opponent’s corner squares.

Quattro: One player operates the 10 King’s pieces, the partner operates the 10 Queen’s pieces. Play starts with the light King, then the dark King, then light Queen, then dark Queen, and so on.

When the King is in check, either player may respond. If they do break the sequence though, either opponent may resume play. Play then continues in sequence from that player on.


Written by Stephen Larsen.
WWW page created: May 26, 2000.