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The Four 'Modern' Chess Principles

Introduction

First seen in Gabriel Vicente Maura's 1968 creation Modern Chess, the four 'modern' chess principles now have generalized definitions that are available to be used in other chess variants.

The "modern" chess principles are:

"Modern" variants

The existing variants (with board size) that use the 'Modern' chess principles are:

"Modern" Principles

  • The option of having both Bishops start up on squares of the same color.

    Simple, just as stated. Bishops may be both placed on the dark, or light, squares at the begining of the game. They may (but do not have to) be on opposite colored squares in the starting position.



    Gabriel Vicente Maura's 1968 Modern Chess starting position. Both Bishops start on the dark squares.

  • Reverse Symmetry

    Reverse symmetric starting positions have a unique feature: both White and Black players get the same view of the board, of both their own pieces as well as for the enemy army.

    ....

    Look at this sample Modern Random Chess starting position, from both White or Black's point of view the see the exact same setup of their pieces, and of their opponent's pieces.

    More examples of Reverse Symmetry:

    Modern Capablanca Random Chess (10x8):



    International Contemporary Random Chess (10x10):



  • Symmetric Castling to either side

    For 9x9 variants castling is like the Orthodox Chess long castling (O-O-O), but to both sides of the board; while for 8x8 and 10x8 variants castling is like the Orthodox Chess short castling (O-O), but to both sides of the board.

    • This table shows where the King and Rook end up and the notation for each type of castling in a 9x9 board:

      White castles a-sidec-castlingO-O-OcKc1, Rd1
      White castles i-sideg-castlingO-O-OgKg1, Rf1
      Black castles a-sidec-castlingO-O-OcKc9, Rd9
      Black castles i-sideg-castlingO-O-OgKg9, Rf9


    • This table shows where the King and Rook end up and the notation for each type of castling in a 8x8 board:

      White castles a-sideb-castlingO-ObKb1, Rc1
      White castles h-sideg-castlingO-OgKg1, Rf1
      Black castles a-sideb-castlingO-ObKb8, Rc8
      Black castles h-sideg-castlingO-OgKg8, Rf8


      .... ....

      Look at the sample Contemporary Random Chess starting position on the left. Both players are able to castle on their first move. The middle diagram shows the board after 1. O-Og (g-castling), and the diagram on the right shows the position after 1... O-Ob (b-castling) from Black's point of view.

    • This table shows where the King and Rook end up and the notation for each type of castling in a 10x8 board:

      White castles a-sideb-castlingO-ObKb1, Rc1
      White castles j-sidei-castlingO-OiKi1, Rh1
      Black castles a-sideb-castlingO-ObKb8, Rc8
      Black castles j-sidei-castlingO-OiKi8, Rh8


  • The Bishop Adjustment Rule


    The Rule that gives a player the option to convert a game where the Bishops start in the same color squares, into a game with Bishops in opposite color squares.

Notes

Compiled by:

José Manuel Carrillo-Muñiz, from Puerto Rico
May 2008


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By Jose Carrillo.
Web page created: 2008-05-17. Web page last updated: 2008-05-17