The Chess Variant Pages




Triss

Triss is a hexagonal chess variant for three players, invented by Hans Mikelson in 1985. Mikelson was at the moment of the invention unaware of the existence of other related hexagonal chess variants.

Rules

The game is played by three players on a board made of hexagons. The board layout is as follows:

Piece movement

Pawn

The pawn outlined in white has the following moves possible. The white circles represent legal moves. Because it is the first move the pawn may move either one or two hexes "forward." The black circles are locations where the pawn would be able to capture an opponents piece.

If a pawn reaches the row of hexes opposite the player it may be "queened." In the above diagram if any of the blue pawns reach the hexes outlined in green they may be "queened."

King

The hexes marked with white circles would be legal moves for this king.

Queen

The hexes marked with white circles represent legal moves for this queen.

Knight

The hexes marked with white circles represent legal moves for this knight.

Bishop

The hexes marked with white circles represent legal moves for this bishop.

Rook

The hexes marked with white circles represent legal moves for this rook.

Winning the game

While there are still three players in the game, the following rules are used:
  • A player that cannot make a legal move (exposing ones king to check is still illegal) passes his turn. If the stalemate is lifted, he can again play on a later turn.
  • A king may be taken. When the king of a player is taken, he is out of the game.
When there are two players, normal mate and stalemate rules are used. The pieces of the player that already is out of the game stay on the board as obstacles: these cannot be taken or moved.

Comments

I was not able to come up with a system for en passent or castling. This system was play tested somewhat without too many problems. The biggest difficulty is obtaining nine bishops. I made one set of pieces out of porcelain. I built a number of boards out of ceramic tiles. My first board was tagboard with paper hexes pasted on it. We passed a coin from player to player so that we could remember whose turn it was. We started calling it "Chip-Passer Chess." The queen begins on her color just as in regular chess. For this board yellow would go first, then red and finally blue. It's not too bad of a game if you can round up enough bishops to play.


Written by Hans Mikelson; edited by Hans Bodlaender.
WWW page created: May 15, 2001.