The Chess Variant Pages



Palace revolution

Palace Revolution is a submission to the 44 squares contest, sent by Pete Leyva. It has two newly added pieces called a Templar knight and the Squire pawn. The game is played on a grid of 44 squares. Rows 3&4 have six squares across, as well as 5&6. Rows 1, 2, 7, & 8 only have five squares across.

The piece set up is as follows: White rooks are set up on B1 & F1. White Templar knights are set up on C1 & E1. White king is set up on D1. White bishops are set up on G3 & G4. White Squire pawns are set up on B2, C2, D2, E2, & F2. Blk. rooks are set up on B8 & F8. Black Templar knights are set up on C8 & E8. Black king is set up on D8. Black bishops are set up on A5 & A6. Black Squire pawns are set up on B7, C7, D7 ,E7, & F7.

The movement of the pieces is as follows:

  • The king and rooks move and capture in the same way as the traditional Fide pieces.
  • The bishops move and capture the same as Fide pieces. The bishops' exceptions are that they are not allowed to come into play until an opposing piece has entered the same row as the bishop or the bishops are threaten by an opposing piece.
  • The Templar knight moves and captures the same as a Fide knight. The templar knight can also move and capture 1,2, and 3 spaces forward only, and can jump when doing so. This leaves his total threat in a design or form of a cross. (See the diagram below.)
  • The Squire pawn moves and captures like a traditional Fide pawn. The Squire pawn holds the power to transform himself into the piece he was protecting. Example: The Squire pawn is protecting a Templar knight and the Templar knight is captured by an opposing piece. The Squire pawn then immediately captures that opposing piece and becomes a Templar knight himself. This power doesn't apply to the king or fellow Squire pawns.

The objective still remains the same, to checkmate your opponents' king.

Written by Pete Leyva. Edited and html by Hans Bodlaender.


Webpage made: May 12, 2004.